Books

Mr. Lemoncello author has soft spot for Bowling Green & its library

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Maria Simon first reaction when she found her name in “Mr. Lemoncello’s Library Olympics” was to call out to her husband. The next was to order a cake. Cake after all is the celebratory food of choice at Mr. Lemoncello’s amazing library. “I just about jumped off my chair,” said Simon, children’s librarian at the Wood County Public Library. The author, Chris Grabenstein, didn’t only name the reference librarian at the fictional Alexandriaville Public Library after Simon, he buried another reference to Bowling Green in the book. The GPS coordinates for Blue Jay Extended Stay Motel where the book’s young heroes find a vital clue are those of the Wood County District Public Library. That makes it a stop for those who do geocaching. A few people have already visited the library because of that. Simon said she didn’t realize that connection until after she contacted the author to thank him for using her name. “He enjoys making his books interactive.” Grabenstein has been known to drop references to places he’s been and people he’s met, as well as other books.  One of the challenges the heroes of the book face is a contest to see who can eat pizza and read at the same time, and then pass a comprehension test. The winning team read Isaac Bashevis Singer’s “Shlemiel Went to Warsaw and Other Stories.” Another character’s favorite book is “Bud, Not Buddy” by Michigan writer Christopher Paul Curtis. The villains in the Mr. Lemoncello books are those who have precious, overly protective attitude toward libraries and books; the heroes are those who want to share their love of reading widely. Grabenstein is no stranger to Bowling Green. Last year on his way to Michigan on a family visit, he visited to promote his book “Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library.” He gave a presentation at the middle school, where his skills as a standup comedian were on full display, Simon said. He loved the…


BGSU Lively Arts through Dec. 5

Nov. 29—Undergraduate and graduate piano students will perform at 7 p.m. at the Wood County District Public Library, 251 N. Main St., Bowling Green. Free Nov. 29—Percussion ensembles will perform at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 30—The Early Music Ensemble will perform at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Dec. 1—The International Film Series concludes with the 1977 film “Neokanchennaia P’esa Dlia Mekhanicheskogo Pianino (An Unfinished Piece for Mechanical Piano),” directed by Nikita Mikhalkov. From Russia’s most well-known contemporary filmmaker, an intriguing story of former lovers who meet at a pre-revolutionary country estate. Casual conversations on social issues and the music of Liszt, Rachmaninoff and Donizetti supply background to a Chekhovian treatment of returning past love. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Dec. 1—Creative writing students in the bachelor of fine arts program will present their work. The reading begins at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Dec. 1—World Percussion Night features multiple styles including performances by the Taiko, Afro-Caribbean and Gamelan ensembles. The concert begins at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171. Advance tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for students and children. All tickets the day of the concert are $10. Dec. 3—Ensembles of the BGSU College of Musical Arts will perform a Holiday Concert as part of the 12th annual ArtsX events. The performance will begin at 4 p.m. in the Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Dec. 3—The 12th annual ArtsX will take place from 5-9 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center and the Wolfe Center for the Arts, including the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries, where student and faculty artists and performers show off their talents to the community. The…


Sweet things to taste, hear, & read on tap at library

From WOOD COUNTY DISTRICT PUBLIC LIBRARY Concerts, a holiday cookie bake-off and tasting, and an author visit help usher in the season at Wood County District Public Library (251 North Main St., Bowling Green). Give yourself a break from the hustle and bustle of the season, and stop by the library for these programs. Tuesday, November 29, 7 pm. Students in piano studies at Bowling Green State University’s College of Musical Arts return to the WCDPL Atrium for another virtuoso concert. This last concert in the BGSU Fall Concert Series at the library features selections from the work of nine master composers, including that of Bach, Beethoven, Schumann, and Brahms, as well as the work of Alexander Scriabin, Gabriel Fauré, Alberto Ginastera, and Sergei Prokofiev. Sunday, December 4, 2 pm. The Great Holiday Bake-off takes place in the Library Atrium. Bakers and cookie tasters are needed! Tasters are invited to come and sample cookies, then vote on their favorites. To enter the bake-off, bakers are asked to bring 2 dozen cookies and their recipe. Multiple cookie entries are accepted, how ever bakers should a recipe for each type of cookie type. For purposes of determining contest winners, bakers will be divided into 2 categories: 12-years-old and younger and 13-years-old and older. Saturday, December 10, 1 pm. Meet the Author, Tom Lambert. 1st Floor Meeting Room. Imagine acquiring a house guest known to you only as “Earl”. All the evidence before you suggests that Earl in fact may be America’s beloved—albeit long dead–humorist and author, Mark Twain. Who is this person really? That’s the question bedeviling Tom in Living with Earl. Tom Lambert, a life-long resident of Bowling Green comes to WCDPL to talk about his debut novel, Living with Earl. Book signing to follow Mr. Lambert’s talk. These programs are free and open to all.For more information, contact WCDPL at 419-352-5050 and find details at wcdpl.org/calendar.  


Faculty senate mulls options for cutting students’ textbook expense

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Bowling Green State University heard about many ways to reduce the cost of textbooks on Tuesday. When it came time to approve a resolution that called for formulating a plan by May, 2017, that would cut costs in half, the senate balked. Not that the senators weren’t behind cutting textbook costs. Rather they were concerned about committing to that specific target before the issue had been studied, as well as for procedural reasons. Gov. John Kasich and the Republican-controlled legislature have been pushing for reductions on the price of textbooks as part of efforts to reduce the cost of higher education for students. This concern comes at a time when the trend has been a significant decrease in state support for higher education. Universities did receive a modest increase in funding in the most recent budget. Before considering the resolution titled “To Lead Ohio Higher Education in Textbook Cost Reduction,” the senate heard from a panel about what is being done to control the cost of textbooks. Provost Rodney Rogers said that after the major expenses of tuition, fees, room and board are paid, students and their parents are then confronted with “additional costs that are pretty significant and sometimes it surprises families.” Jeff Nelson, the manager of the University bookstore, said that the timing of when professors decide what materials they will use is key. The earlier, the better, he said. Through BGSU Choose, price comparison software, the bookstore gives students information on what books and materials cost at the bookstore and at 12 other national vendors, including Amazon. As soon as the bookstore knows what books will be required it can do the research, he said. The system also “gives us a lot of data and analytics.” Sometimes that information leads the bookstore to discount the price of some textbooks. He said that 85 percent of students who use BGSU Choose end up buying something from the bookstore. Nelson also said that…


BGSU arts events through Nov. 16

Through Nov. 21 – “The Deathworks of May Elizabeth Kramer,” a mixed media installation by The Poyais Group, continues through Nov. 21 in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery in the Fine Arts Center. The exhibit is a purported recreation by the Poyais Group of outsider artist Kranmer’s (1867-1977) private lifework, a tent version of the town where she lived, with each tent representing someone who had died. Discovered by a team of anthropologists after her death but then lost in a fire, the installation was remade by the Poyais Group (Jesse Ball, Thordis Bjornsdottir, Olivia Robinson and Jesse Stiles) based on notes by one of the original anthropologists. Gallery Hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Through Nov. 22 – “Criminal Justice?” an exhibit by activist artists Carol Jacobson and Andrea Bowers, investigates the attitudes and biases embedded in the U.S. criminal justice system. Jacobson is an award-winning social documentary artist whose works in video and photography address issues of women’s criminalization and censorship. See story: http://bgindependentmedia.org/artist-documents-the-cycle-of-abuse-suffered-by-female-inmates/. Bowers’ video “#sweetjane” and drawings explore the 2012 Steubenville, Ohio rape case and the citizens whose activism resulted in two rape convictions. The drawings reproduce the text messages sent among the teenage witnesses to the assault on an underage young woman. “Criminal Justice?” is on view in the Willard Wankelman Gallery at the Fine Arts Center. Gallery Hours are 11 a.m. – 4p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Nov. 2 – The Faculty Artist Series features the BGSU woodwind faculty in an 8 p.m.performance in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 3 – The International Film Series continues with the 2015 film “Le Dernier Loup (Wolf Totem),” directed by Jean-Jacques Annaud. Life is tenuous for humans and animals in the wonderfully filmed Mongolian steppe. The story presents a stark view of the region 50 years ago, during China’s Cultural Revolution, focusing on Beijing student…


Piper Kerman found friends, a book & a cause in prison

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Piper Kerman was a just a couple years out of college when she stepped over the line. She’d been traveling all over the world with her drug dealing girlfriend. She tried to keep out of her lover’s business until she was asked to carry a suitcase full of money from Chicago to Brussels. Kerman knew what she’d done, and soon after broke off the relationship, returned to the United States and put that life behind her. That’s what she thought. About five years later federal authorities rang her doorbell in New York City, and the time came to pay for her crime. Kerman ended up serving 15 months in federal prison, and came out to write the best seller “Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison.” On Tuesday night she spoke at Bowling Green State University as the guest of University Libraries’ Ordinary People: Extraordinary Lives series. Being in prison meant more than serving time. Kerman said when she had carried that money from Chicago to Brussels she didn’t think about the consequences her actions. In prison she came face to face with those whose lives had been devastated by drugs. “My closeness and connection to those women led me to realize the harm of my own actions, and I’m very, very grateful for that,” she said. Kerman said she was grateful to Jenji Kohan who produced the Netflix series based on the book, for keeping the issues she wanted to highlight in the book in the forefront. Among those were friendship. Kerman said she didn’t go into prison expecting to find friends, but wouldn’t have survived without them. Kerman talked about Pom-Pom. They worked at jobs near each other in prison. Pom-Pom was released a few months before Kerman, just before Thanksgiving. She ended up sleeping on the floor of a relative who didn’t want her there. The area she lived in was cold and dangerous and poor. Before…


Author tells BGSU the best answer ends with a question mark

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Warren Berger travels around telling people they should ask more questions. In some circles that could get him labeled as troublemaker; elsewhere, he’d be considered an innovator. As a journalist Berger asks questions for a living, and he’s made them the focus of his work. His book “A More Beautiful Question,” is the common read for Bowling Green State University this year, and the self-described “questionologist” visited campus Wednesday to further proselytize about the importance of questioning. Asking questions, he quipped, “has allowed me to go without a job for 25 years.” Trained as a journalist at Syracuse University, he chafed at the notion of working in a newsroom where his inquiry would be subject to assignments handed out by an editor. So he ventured down the route of independent journalist. And while he asked questions that whole time – “as a journalist questions are the only tool you have,” it has only been in the last few years that the full import of the subject has revealed itself to him. He learned that questioning is not always valued. It challenges the status quo. And over time, people ask fewer and fewer questions. “If you ask questions you can be seen as disruptive,” Berger said. That’s especially true of students in inner city schools. But people are born to ask questions. It starts at age 2, he said, and peaks at about age 4. “A 4-year-old girl is the ultimate question-asking machine,” he said. She averages 300 a day, and boys that age are not far behind. Though questioning falls off afterward, creative people continue ask them, and those questions, he discovered, have shaped our world. The genesis of innovation, whether the internet or Airbnb, the cell phone or Gatorade, is a question. It starts with why? – to understand the problem. Then what if? – to generate ideas. And then how about? – to start solving the problem. These questions unleash a steady…


BGSU arts events calendar through Nov. 9

At the galleries – “The Deathworks of May Elizabeth Kramer,” a mixed media installation by The Poyais Group, continues through Nov. 21 in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery in the Fine Arts Center. The exhibit, a collaboration with the New Music Festival, claims to be a recreation by the Poyais Group of outsider artist Kranmer’s (1867-1977) private lifework, a tent version of the town where she lived, with each tent representing someone who had died. Discovered by a team of anthropologists after her death but then lost in a fire, the installation was remade by the Poyais Group (Jesse Ball, Thordis Bjornsdottir, Olivia Robinson and Jesse Stiles) based on notes by one of the original anthropologists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Oct. 27–Creative writing M.F.A. students will read from their work at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Oct. 27–The International Film Series continues with the 2012 German film “Oh Boy (A Coffee in Berlin),” directed by Jan Ole Gerster. A young man in the dreamy process of losing everything he has wanders through Berlin to the accompaniment of comedic mood music. His contemporary angst plays out on the black-and-white background of a city with a dark past. It’s never been so difficult to get a cup of coffee in a huge city. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater in Hanna Hall. Free Oct. 27 – A performance of “Evelyn in Purgatory,” an award-winning dark comedy by Topher Payne, will begin at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theater located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Tickets can be purchased form the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171, or visit www.bgsu.edu/arts. Advance tickets are $15 and $5 for students and children. All tickets the day of the performance are $20. (See story at http://bgindependentmedia.org/bgsu-cast-delivers-heavenly-performance-of-evelyn-in-purgatory/) Oct. 28–The exhibition “Criminal Justice?” opens in the Willard Wankelman Gallery at the Fine Arts Center with a 5:30 p.m….


“A More Beautiful Question” author to speak at BGSU, Oct. 26

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING& COMMUNICATIONS As part of Bowling Green State University’s Common Read, author Warren Berger will speak at the University Oct. 26. Berger, a journalist and innovation expert, will talk about one of the most powerful forces for igniting change in business and in daily lives – questioning. Questioning can help people identify and solve problems, come up with game-changing ideas and pursue fresh opportunities. Berger’s presentation begins at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 26 in the Lenhart Grand Ballroom of the Bowen-Thompson Student Union; doors open at 7 p.m. Berger will answer questions and sign books following his presentation, which is free and open to the public. Berger’s book, “A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas,” expands on the University’s Common Experience theme of “In the Spirit of Innovation.” He believes that questioning leads to innovation, can help people be more successful in their careers and can spark change in business and personal lives. To reach this conclusion, Berger has studied hundreds of the world’s leading innovators, designers, education leaders, creative thinkers and red-hot startups to analyze how they ask game-changing questions, solve problems and create new possibilities. In his book, he shows that the most creative, successful people tend to be expert questioners, raising questions no one else is asking – and finding the answers everyone else is seeking. Berger currently writes for Fast Company and Harvard Business Review; he was a longtime contributor at Wired magazine and The New York Times.


Bob Dylan worthy recipient of Nobel Prize for Literature, BGSU scholars say

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The times they are a changin’ in Stockholm. This year the Nobel Prize committee surprised the world by awarding the Literature Prize to songwriter Bob Dylan for “having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition.” Jack Santino, a professor of popular culture at Bowling Green State University, said the announcement had “an element of surprise.” “It’s expanding their rubric of what literature is,” he said. Lawrence Coates, who teaches in BGSU’s Creative Writing Program, noted Toni Morrison was the last American to win the Nobel for Literature, back in 1993. “That’s a long stretch without an American being recognized,” he said. And while as a fiction writer he has his own ideas about who would be fitting recipients of the prize – authors Don DeLillo and Cormac McCarthy – he nonetheless sees Dylan as a good choice. “That he works in the popular tradition of song is great,” Coates said. “Having somebody who writes and performs goes way back to the roots of literature. I appreciate the Nobel committee looking beyond literature having a very limited audience to literature that has a very broad audience.” “Often song lyrics don’t work when you just read them,” Santino said. Though lyrics as “stylized language” are closest to poetry as a literary genre, songs are a hybrid, akin to the graphic novel. “The curious element of it is a songwriter being canonized opens the floodgates for all sorts of things,” he said. Santino expects the choice will spark debates about what is and isn’t literature. “He has an ability to write a couplet, or to sum up a thought in a very catchy line or two, and they sort of enter into oral tradition which an interesting development is given his professional relationship to folk music,” Santino said. Santino said he jokes that the most common sources of catch phrases are the Bible, Shakespeare and Bob Dylan. People often don’t even know they are…


Interview with “Beautiful Question” author at public library

From WOOD COUNTY DISTRICT PUBLIC LIBRARY The library’s popular “Job Coach,” HR expert Frank Day, will be available Wednesday, Oct. 19 starting at 9:30 a.m. to provide advice on polishing your resume, exploring online job sites, or filling out an online application. Please call ahead, 419-352-5050, to make an appointment for your half-hour session with Day. Library users are invited to rediscover the relaxing pastime of coloring on Monday, Oct. 24 at 7 p.m. in the second Floor Meeting Room. The library provides supplies, but participants may bring their own if they wish. A “Tablet and Smartphone Class,” presented in partnership with the Wood County Committee on Aging and the BGSU School of Media and Communications, will be held Tuesday, Oct. 25 at 6:15 p.m. in the 2nd Floor Meeting Room. The class is structured to suit your needs and to help you to get the most from your phone or mobile device. Registration is required. For details and to register call the Senior Center at 419-353-5661. Join us for an intimate “Coffee at the Carter House” on Wednesday Oct. 26 at 9:30 am. Special guest will be Warren Berger, author of the BGSU Common Read selection, “A More Beautiful Question.” Hosted by Community Reads in partnership with the BGSU Common Read, the event includes an interview with Berger by Clif Boutelle, with a book signing to follow. Library users are encouraged to take a moment to help WCDPL’s Board of Trustees thank library staff by submitting nominations for the John M. Gibson Outstanding Performance Award. The award, which recognizes library staff who have “gone the extra mile,” has been presented annually since 2005. Details and nomination forms may be seen online at http://wcdpl.org/content/john-m-gibson-award-nomination. WCDPL’s full programming calendar, including scheduling and current selections of its popular book discussion groups, may be seen on line at wcdpl.org/calendar. These events are free and open to all. For more details about these and other programs for adults at WCDPL, call the library at…


Irish poet Paul Durcan to read work inspired by visits to Toledo Museum of Art & environs

Poet Paul Durcan is celebrated as a national treasure in his native Ireland. Illustrious literary figures, including British poet laureate Carol Ann Duffy, are to be found in the audience of his theatrical, dramatic readings – performed in his deep Irish brogue.        Now Durcan will cross the Atlantic to give a free reading of poetry he penned about works of art in the Toledo Museum of Art’s collection during a Masters Series on Thursday, Oct. 13 at 6 p.m. in the Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle. Titled Wild, Wild Erie, the book was commissioned by the Museum’s Director Brian Kennedy, a fellow Irishman who asked whether Durcan would be willing to apply his heartfelt and humorous approach to prose about the TMA art collection.        The talk will be followed by a book signing at 7:15 p.m.        “Paul Durcan is one of Ireland’s great poets,” Kennedy said. “His wit, humor and intelligence make him a magnetic character in the cultural life of Ireland.”        This marks Durcan’s first project with an American museum. He embarked on similar collaborations twice before, with the National Gallery of Ireland (producing “Crazy About Women”) and the National Gallery, London (resulting in “Give Me Your Hand”). Born in Dublin in 1944, he has enjoyed a very successful writing career. His poetry often critiques social mores with a heartfelt humor. In 2014, he was awarded the Bob Hughes Lifetime Achievement Award at the Irish Book Awards.        Durcan researched extensively for Wild, Wild Erie, visiting the region multiple times over the past year to observe the works of art in the collection, visit parks and experience the city and its culture. In his poetry, he offers delightful observations of familiar Toledo moments, in the Museum and outside it. In his poem “The Cloister Gallery,” he writes of the awe he saw children experience in this popular Museum space. “The two boys asked the man: “Who are you? What are you?”/ Gently, gently, kindly, kindly,…


Piano concert, job coaching all on tap at public library

From WOOD COUNTY DISTRICT PUBLIC LIBRARY The library’s popular “Job Coach,” HR expert Frank Day, will be available Wednesday, October 5 starting at 9:30 am to provide advice on polishing your resume, exploring online job sites, or filling out an online application. Please call ahead, 419-352-5050,  to make an appointment for your half-hour session with Mr. Day. “Tablet and Smartphone Classes,” presented in partnership with the Wood County Committee on Aging and the BGSU School of Media and Communications, will be held Tuesday, October 4 and 11 at 6:15 pm in the 2nd Floor Meeting Room. These classes are structured to suit your needs and to help you to get the most from your phone or mobile device. Registration is required. For details and to register call the Senior Center at 419-353-5661. A popular concert series which showcases graduate students in piano studies at BGSU’s College of Musical Arts returns to the WCDPL Atrium on Monday October 3 at 7 pm. The program features three centuries of keyboard classics from composers such as Bach, Beethoven, Rachmaninoff, Liszt, and Chopin. WCDPL’s full programming calendar, including youth programs and scheduling and selections for its popular book discussion groups during the month of October may be seen on line at wcdpl.org/calendar. These events are free and open to all. For more details about these and other programs for adults at WCDPL, call the library at 419-352-5050.


Library offers programs on books, technology, cooking & more

From WOOD COUNTY DISTRICT PUBLIC LIBRARY September winds up at Wood County District Public Library (251 N. Main St., Bowling Green) with book discussion groups (including a live conversation via Skype with author Sam Quinones), an opportunity for adults to treat themselves to an evening of coloring with friends, a class on getting the most from your tablet and smartphone, and a Skype presentation from the Federal Trade Commission on safe online practices and behaviors. Staff from the Federal Trade Commission share free resources and answer parents’ questions about online safety for kids during a live Skype presentation, “Living Life Online” on Monday, Sept. 19 at 7 pm in the 2nd Floor Meeting Room. Coffee Talk with Kristin Wetzel meets Tuesday, Sept. 22 at 10:30 a.m. in the 2nd Floor Meeting Room to discuss “Fall of the Marigolds” by Susan Meissner. The library’s popular “Job Coach,” HR expert Frank Day, will be available Wednesday, Sept. 21 starting at 9:30 am to provide advice on polishing your resume, exploring online job sites, or filling out an online application. Please call ahead, 419-352-5050, to make an appointment for your half-hour session with Mr. Day. On Monday, Sept. 26 at 7:00 pm adults are invited to join us for “Coloring: It’s Not Just for Kids” in the 2nd Floor Meeting Room. Rediscover the relaxing and creative pastime of coloring. The first in a series of “Tablet and Smartphone Classes,” presented in partnership with the Wood County Committee on Aging and the BGSU School of Media and Communications, will be held Tuesday, Sept. 27 at 6:15 pm in the 2nd Floor Meeting Room. These classes are structured to suit your needs and to help you to get the most from your phone or mobile device. Registration is required. For details and to register call the Senior Center at 419-353-5661. The Page to Table cookbook group, led by Kristin Wetzel, explores Asian cuisine on Tuesday, September 20 in the Carter House (307 N. Church Street,…


Wendell Mayo brings his “lonely ones” into the spotlight

By DAVIDDUPONT BG Independent News Writing stories can be a lonely job. Maybe that’s why fiction writers populate their stories with so many lonely souls. So when award-winning fiction writer Wendell Mayo took the stage last week in what was billed as the first in the Spotlight on the Arts series, his theme was All My Lonely Ones. But as a professor in the Bowling Green State University Creative Writing Program, he’s certainly not alone in his pursuit. Eschewing the usual introduction, he spent the first few minutes of his presentation singing the praises of BGSU Creative Writing Program. And as a former engineer, he did it with a string of numbers including 415 books published by graduates of the program and 226 awards bestowed on their work. And that includes the big one, a Pulitzer Prize in fiction, for Anthony Doerr. The program’s importance, though, is unquantifiable. “What we do here is bring authors from all over the world out of isolation,” he said. Together they share insights and learn the craft of writing.  Mayo said he started writing in the 1980s when he was living in the San Francisco and commuting by train to his job as a chemical engineer. There surrounded by people, his first lonely ones first stepped out onto the page. Mayo then presented four examples of his own craft. “I introduce you to some of my lonely ones.” Mayo offered a few words telling how each story came about, each a fictional elaboration on a real world situation, an example of how germ of inspiration from daily life can be spun into a fictional construct. Then he stepped aside as the stories were read by either F. Daniel Rzicznek or Jackie Cummins. The first story, from early in Mayo’s career, grew out of a mystery about his mother. When his father died, she started signing checks including “Soledad” as part of her name. The checks bounced. He wondered where the name came from. In…