Books

Library offers variety of adult activities

A tour of downtown Bowling Green highlighting the city’s historic past, coloring for adults, job coach sessions, and book discussions are among the programs being offered for adults at Wood County District Public Library in BG. Saturday, May 21 Join WCDPL’s Local History librarian Marnie Pratt and Kelli Kling of the Wood County Museum at 10 am and discover downtown BG’s historic past with a “Business in Boomtown Walking Tour.” The tour leaves promptly at 10, rain or shine, from the Carter House parking lot. Light refreshments will be served in the Carter House at the tour’s conclusion. Registration required. Call 419-352-5050. Monday, May 23 Coloring It’s Not Just for Kids. Come, join friends and neighbors who have rediscovered coloring—a relaxing and creative pastime for adults. Coloring sheets ad colored pencils provided, but feel free to bring your own supplies. “Coloring: It’s Not Just for Kids” takes place in the library’s newly renovated 2nd Floor Meeting Room starting at 7 pm. Tuesday, May 24 Just the Facts, the library’s popular nonfiction book group led by Anne Render discusses Going Clear by Lawrence Wright at 10:30 am in the 2nd Floor Meeting Room. Thursday, May 26 Meet with retired HR expert Frank…


Sonnenberg’s “Gastown Girl” Documents An “Ordinary Life” Lived  Extraordinarily  Well;  Memoir Signing at Grounds for Thought

By FRANCES BRENT Lois Sonnenberg grew up during the Depression Years, in a depressed part of Tonawanda, NY known as Gastown, in upstate New York near the Niagara Area. The times may have been depressed but Lois wasn’t. An extended family, a tight knit neighborhood, strong female role models and her own joyful and intrepid spirit launched her into wider world. April 23, 2016 marks the celebration,  at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church,  of the life of her friend and Colleague,  the beloved BG School music teacher Jim Brown. Sonnenberg’s table at Grounds for Thought from 2 to 6 p.m.  is along the Art Walk route. Her story, in part, is living the American dream in a small town community such  as Bowling Green. Eighty-eight years young now,  and with Otie, her husband of nearly seventy years at her side, Lois turned her energies over the last five rears, into remembering, researching and  writing “Gastown Girl.”   She recounts  a life, not free of challenges , so much as a life that was a non-stop journey to the next opportunity and adventure. Among the titles she has enjoyed: crack the whip survivor, cheer-leader, French horn player, Girl State delegate, US Cadet Nurse…


Lawrence Coates’ historical fiction earns top BGSU research award

By BGSU Office of Marketing & Communications Reading Dr. Lawrence Coates’ fiction is to be immersed in another era, from the California of the first settlers to its vineyards during Prohibition and even the first dot-com bust of the 1990s. Coates achieves this resonance in part through assiduous research, making sure that all the subtle details render the sights, sounds, landscape and tenor of the times against which his stories are set. His achievements were recognized with the 2016 Olscamp Research Award, presented to him at the annual Faculty Excellence Awards on April 14. Given annually by the Office of Sponsored Programs and Research to a faculty member for outstanding scholarly or creative accomplishments during the previous three years, the award includes a $2,000 cash prize and a reserved parking spot for a year. Coates, a professor and chair of the English department, has received recognition for his work almost from the beginning. His first novel, “The Blossom Festival,” was chosen by Barnes and Noble for its 1999 Discover Great New Writers program, and he has continued to win kudos and awards ever since on both the regional and national scales. He has been the recipient of the Western States…


Karen Osborn is a novelist and poet, despite – or perhaps because of – growing up among scientists

By FRANCES BRENT Karen L. Osborn, Distinguished Visiting Professor of Writing at BGSU addressed a young audience gathered on the worn pews of venerable Prout Chapel about her creative “Life on Mars.” The haircuts, hair colors and head coverings were varied, as befits a gathering of the artistic young. It was a comfortable audience for Osborn whose novels explore the difficulties of being young, not in isolation, but rather as part of the continuum of life. (The audience had its mature component too.) The evening was a meditation on the craft of creative writing, with learned and meaningful references to Chekhov, Virginia Woolf, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Robert Frost and Walt Whitman. Interesting, insightful, intellectual and all tied to the Niagara River banks where she grew up – tuned to a dramatic natural environment and within a family that wanted to explain it. The depth, heart of Osborn’s writer’s craft developed as she grew up a “space child” surrounded by a scientific family that didactically and enthusiastically quantified and categorized everything. All this science was the other half – the balance of her creative world. This grounding in the observed world was a platform for her to start wondering about the…