children

BG students and community team up for magic of reading

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News The second graders at Crim Elementary inched in as close as possible as their teacher sat down in the rocking chair with a new book. They leaned in, some bouncing with excitement, as Stacey Higgins cracked open the magic of the new book, “Kenny and the Dragon.” This is the moment that teachers love – when children are visibly enthused about reading. And this is the moment that is recreated each year with the 1BookBG program that unifies all the elementaries and the community in reading one storybook. “It’s the community experience – to see our schools and community work on this together is wonderful,” Higgins said. Every elementary student family is given a copy of the book – this year being “Kenny and the Dragon” by Tony DiTerrlizi. For the next month, students will be reading it at school and with their families at home. And businesses throughout the community will offer trivia questions on the book. “I love reading,” said second grader Liam Walsh. “I like that reading helps me get smarter. All I want to get is smarter.” Walsh had big plans Monday to go home and read the first four chapters. “I’ll read literally all day,” he said. Kenley Mangold and Mason Naus check out their new books. His classmates Kenley Mangold and Mason Naus were paging through their new books, professing their love for reading. “I read every book every day,” Kenley said of her book collection at home. “I keep telling my mom I need more books.” Naus was particularly excited because DiTerrliz is one of his favorite authors. “I have two bookshelves, actually three,” Naus said. “I need more bookshelves.” Each year, the 1BookBG books are purchased with donations from PTOs, community organizations and local businesses. This year the district is holding a “family night” on Thursday at the middle school, from 6 to 8 p.m., for activities involving the 1BookBG. The goal is to bring the families of the community together to celebrate literacy and build connections between the schools.   Out in the community, 25 businesses have volunteered to be trivia sites for 1BookBG this year. Students can ask for trivia questions about “Kenny and the Dragon,” and if…


Boy Scouts opening up troops to girls starting next week

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News Scouting has been preparing boys for decades. Preparing them to face outside elements when camping. Preparing them for helping elderly ladies cross the street. Preparing them to be good citizens. Now the organization that has been preparing young men has got to be ready itself by Feb. 1 to allow girls into the ranks. Nationwide, girls will be able to join Boy Scout troops – with no boys – but with the same programming that has been used for years. In Bowling Green, one of the five Boy Scout troops is planning to expand with a girls’ troop. “There is absolutely interest and they are working on forming one at St. Al’s,”  said Alissa Hunt, district director with the Erie Shores Council of the Boy Scouts of America. It isn’t that Boy Scouts are anti Girl Scouts, Hunt said. “It is a wonderful program and we support all youth organizations,” Hunt said Thursday about Girl Scouts. But Boy Scouts of America has heard from many families who wanted girls allowed. “They’ve been kind of tagging along with their siblings,” and now they want in, Hunt said. “I think it’s going to go wonderfully,” she said. To be absolutely clear – boys and girls will have the same programming, but in separate troops. Ed Caldwell, CEO of Erie Shores Council of Boy Scouts of America, tried to calm fears in a press release when the decision to allow girls was first announced. “Rest assured that the Boy Scouts of America organization has not changed its name.  The Boy Scouts of America will continue the time-honored mission of preparing young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law in order to become responsible, participating citizens.  Offering programs that accomplish this mission to girls will enhance, rather than diminish, this vital work,” Caldwell said. Beginning Feb. 1, the Boy Scout program name will be Scouts BSA. All participants will be called scouts. Girls will be eligible to earn the highest rank of Eagle. “It’s offering the program that we know works for girls, too,” Hunt said. However, not all Girl Scouts organizations are sold on the effectiveness…


Parks district offers winter activities

From WOOD COUNTY PARK DISTRICT The Wood County Parks District is offering a full slate of programs to help young and old to get the most out of winter. Polar Parks Mini-Camp Wednesday – Friday, January 2 – 4; 9:00 am – noon W.W. Knight Nature Preserve 25930 White Road, Perrysburg Experience a wild Wood County winter through this 3-day mini-camp! Each day highlights a different educational theme and seeks to explore through hands-on and outdoor activities. Cost: $12/$10 FWCP per day, or $30/$25 FWCP for all three days. Ages 8-13. The registration deadline is one week before the beginning of the camp day. Leaders: Jim Witter and Craig Spicer Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Introduction to Orienteering Sunday, January 6; 1:00 – 3:00 pm Bradner Interpretive Center 11491 Fostoria Road, Bradner Find out what else the magnetic compass can do besides show you which way is north. This reliable low-tech tool can help you get from point A to point B. We will learn the basics indoors and then take it outside on a short orienteering course. Leader: Bill Hoefflin Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 EcoLit Book Group Meeting Thursday, January 10; 7:00 – 9:00 pm W.W. Knight Nature Preserve: Hankison Great Room 29530 White Road, Perrysburg For this meeting, please read The Snow Leopard by Peter Matthiessen. Discussion leader: Cheryl Lachowski, Senior Lecturer, BGSU English Dept. and Ohio Certified Volunteer Naturalist (OCVN) Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Homeschoolers: Project Feederwatch Friday, January 11; 10:00 – 11:00 am Bradner Interpretive Center 11491 Fostoria Road, Bradner Learn how Wood County Park’s volunteers count birds at our windows on wildlife and how you can help scientists learn about bird populations in Wood County. Leader: Jim Witter Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Native American Moccasin Making Workshop Series Saturdays, January 12, January 26, February 9, February 23; 10:00 am – 2:00 pm Carter Historic Farm 18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green Learn the skill of making authentic Native American moccasins over the course of four sessions. The Plains two-piece style will be featured. Cost for series: $30. Leader: Stewart Orr Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897 Arctic Open Archery Saturday, January 12; 12:30 – 3:00 pm Arrowwood Archery Range…


Wood County Hospital welcomes two New Year’s babies

By BG INDEPENDENT NEWS It was a boy, and then it was a girl at Wood County Hospital on the second day of 2019. The first baby of the year born was Adrian Jacari Lofton, son of Caitlin Blunk and William Lofton, of Bowling Green. He arrived Jan. 2 at 8:24 a.m. Anne Bechstein An hour later Anne Bechstein, daughter of Adam and Jana Bechstein, of Bowling Green, was born. In both cases the mothers were scheduled to deliver by Cesarean section. Bechstein’s operation came on schedule, not so for Blunk. She was scheduled to deliver on Jan. 10 but at about 3 a.m. Wednesday her water broke. She was staying with her mother Karah Thomason, who got her to the hospital. Adrian joins a 4-year-old brother Jaiden Nuzum, who is quite the proud brother, his mother said. “He thinks it’s his baby.” Adrian weighed in at eight pounds, eight ounces and measured 20.5 inches. Anne weighed seven pounds, seven ounces and 19 inches in length. She joins three siblings in the Bechstein household, Michael, 9, who was born on New Year’s Eve in 2009, Joseph, 3, and Mary, 22 months.  Lisa Barndt, the hospital’s head of obstetrics, said the parents of the first born baby were treated to a fine meal by the hospital’s head chef.  The families also received hand knit hats from Donald Navarre, a blanket knit by Retonia Westray, and special outfits made by Amanda Barndt.


Kids find presents and police full of Christmas cheer

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News Twelve-year-old Alize Rivera was nervous when she was told she was going Christmas shopping with a police officer. “I was actually scared. I’ve never been around cops,” Alize said. But it was a matter of seconds before Alize and her sister, Nahla Drones, 7, of Bowling Green, warmed up to the idea. By the time they steered their shopping carts to a toy aisle, they seemed quite at home. The shelves full of pink girlie toys had the sisters squealing with delight. As they debated over which toys to get, Bowling Green Police Officer Robin Short kept track of the dollar amounts for each girl – allowing them to decide if an item was too much. “There’s a need out there,” Short said. “And sometimes it’s not about the needs – it’s about building relationships.” The kids shopping Friday afternoon at Meijer in Bowling Green got plenty of gifts and goodwill from the police officers joining them. Nahla Drones checks out pillows. This is the eighth year for the shop with a cop event in Wood County, organized by Dan Van Vorhis of the Wood County Fraternal Order of Police. Last year, there were 135 kids signed up, with referrals from their schools or area police officers. This year there were 155 – with most of them shopping earlier this month in Perrysburg, and eight shopping Friday at Meijer in Bowling Green. Each child is given $125 to spend how they wish. “The community really does step up to donate,” Van Vorhis said. Many of the officers have heart-tugging stories from their years of shopping with kids in the program.       Bowling Green Detective Sgt. Doug Hartman remembers the children who spend their gift money on socks, underwear and presents for their siblings. “That’s the sad part,” he said. “Some kids spend more on necessities than they do toys.” Hartman recalled one little boy. “He said, ‘Maybe I should get soap.’ That just breaks your heart,” Hartman said. Det. Sgt. Doug Hartman shops with Noah Grant and his mom, Tonia Grant. On Friday, Hartman was paired up with Noah Grant, 16, of North Baltimore. Noah first picked out a shirt, pants and socks – then went to see…


Park district celebrates winter & the holidays throughout December

From WOOD COUNTY PARK DISTRICT Poinsettia Tour Tuesday, December 4; 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. Bostdorff’s Greenhouse Acres 18862 N. Dixie Hwy, Bowling Green Take a tour of new premarket poinsettia varieties at Bostdorff’s Greenhouse. Evaluate these new varieties and vote on the one you like best. You may be one of three lucky people to take one of these “winter roses” home with you! Leader: Stewardship department   EcoLit Book Group Meeting Thursday, December 6; 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. W.W. Knight Nature Preserve: Friends’ Green Room 29530 White Road, Perrysburg For this meeting, please read The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks by Terry Tempest Williams. Discussion leader: Cheryl Lachowski, Senior Lecturer, BGSU English Dept. and Ohio Certified Volunteer Naturalist (OCVN) Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897   A Heritage Holiday December 8; 1:00 – 4:00 pm Carter Historic Farm 18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green Join us to share some seasonal cheer at the farm’s open house. We’ll have carols played on the player piano, cookie decorating, ornament making, and other activities for the whole family. This festive community event is open to all.   Winter Reptiles Wednesday, December 12; 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. W.W. Knight Nature Preserve: Friends’ Green Room 25930 White Road, Perrysburg When the weather turns white and chilly, what do all of our scaly neighbors do? Migrate, hibernate, or put on a sweater? We’ll learn these things and more as we meet two of our animal ambassadors. Leader: Craig Spicer Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897   The Geminid Meteor Shower Thursday, December 13; 9:30 – 11:00 p.m. Cricket Frog Cove Area 14810 Freyman Road, Cygnet The Geminids are considered one of the best annual meteor showers because they are easily and frequently seen. Bring a thick blanket or reclining folding chair and appropriate clothing for an evening under the stars. Emerge: This shower peaks around 2 a.m., but meteors will be visible beginning between 9-10 p.m. Cancelled if skies are cloudy.  Leader: Bill Hoefflin Register at www.wcparks.org, or call (419) 353-1897   Homeschoolers: Old Time Games Friday, December 14; 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. W.W. Knight Nature Preserve: Hankison Great Room 29530 White Road, Perrysburg Learn how Native American and pioneer children had fun, and…


BG school bus cameras catch people passing illegally

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   School buses in Bowling Green are now equipped with their own type of red-light cameras. So far this school year, at least 19 vehicles have illegally passed Bowling Green City School buses stopped for picking up or dropping off children. So the district is investing in cameras mounted on the bus exteriors to catch drivers illegally passing stopped buses. Wednesday morning, Bowling Green City Schools Transportation Director Toby Snow stood outside Kenwood Elementary as the buses conducted annual emergency evacuation drills during National Bus Safety Week. But Snow is aware that one of the biggest threats comes from other vehicles sharing the road with school buses. About three years ago, the district put external cameras on three buses that were experiencing the most problems with red light runners. But then the number of vehicles running past stopped buses jumped this year, Snow said. He reported 18 to the school board earlier this month. That number has since grown to 19. “I just decided it’s a good thing to see from all of them,” Snow said of buying additional cameras. So far, 11 buses are equipped with the cameras – which cost about $750 each. Seven more cameras are on order. The district has a total of 20 school buses that carry about 1,300 students to and from school each day. The law requires drivers to stop for school buses when the red lights are on and the stop sign is extended on the side of the bus. Vehicles are required to stop at least 10 feet away from the bus. The bus drivers put yellow lights on first to warn drivers that a bus stop is approaching. If the bus is on a four-lane road, just the vehicles headed the same direction as the bus are required to stop. Bus drivers are asked to identify the vehicle, license plate and give a description of the driver for vehicles passing them illegally. But that is asking too much for drivers who are also watching a busload of children, Snow said. “It’s almost impossible,” he said. So the cameras help do the job. They are mounted at an angle so they catch license plates of passing vehicles. “We’ve had…


Kiddie tractor pull set for fall Firefly Nights

From DOWNTOWN BOWLING GREEN The Kiddie Pedal Tractor Pull will take place on South Main St. in front of the H20 Church Friday, Oct. 19,. Registration for the pulls is from 6-7 p.m. and is free for ages 4-11 in conjunction with Firefly Nights- all Festival on Main Street. The Kiddie Pedal Pulls will take place from 7-8:30 p.m. Each child will receive a ribbon and frisbee for participation. The top three children will earn trophies as well as qualify and move on to the state pulls with Gary Daiber(Owner of Buckeye Pedal Pullers). Following the Kiddie Pedal Pulls there will be an Adult Pedal Pull. The Adult Pedal Pull is a $5 per person donation. Proceeds will go to benefit Downtown Bowling Green, as well as helping Firefly nights expand for the future. Adult participants may choose to compete against a friend or enemy or we will be happy to choose a competitor. Downtown Bowling Green thanks The National Tractor Pulling Championship Organization for sponsoring the Kiddie Pedal Tractor Pull. We are very excited to kick off the Pedal Pulls event and hope to continue to make this event a tradition. Contact our office with any questions about the event. Please,  email us at Marketing_Intern@Downtownbgohio.org or call 419-354-4332.  


Teachers pack the PAC for guidance and guffaws

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Elementary principal Gerry Brooks started doing videos for his staff out of frustration. How else could he do justice to the daily trials of teachers? For example, few people realize just how chaotic kindergarten lunchtime can be. But with Brooks’ southern twang, he matter-of-factly talks about his last stint on cafeteria duty. He dutifully opened 47 Lunchables, including inserting the straw into the explosive drink pouches. He engaged in debate on whether or not a pony would make a good house pet. He listened to one child talk about his grandma having six toes on one foot – to which Brooks’ responded, “She’s so fancy.” He retrieved children from underneath the tables. And he glanced down to see a little girl licking his hand. She had noticed something brown on his hand and wanted to help get it off. Sigh. Just another day at school… Brooks has been a principal for 12 years, currently at an elementary in Lexington, Kentucky. Prior to that, he was a classroom teacher for six years and an intervention specialist for two years. His videos resonate with teachers, since so many of his frustrations are universally shared among educators. Brooks has a following or more than 500,000 people. On Saturday, 1,500 of his fans crowded into two presentations by Brooks at the Bowling Green City Schools Performing Arts Center. The event, hosted by the Bowling Green Education Association, attracted teachers from all over Ohio and Michigan. Brooks donates the proceeds from his talks back to the host district. In this case, those funds will be used for mental health resources and programming for staff and students. His talk and video clips all have an irreverent tone – and had teachers in the audience cheering in agreement. Brooks talked about his latest “products” such as a shirt stating, “My principal is great.” Once the principal has left the room, the teachers can then untuck the bottom of the shirt which reads, “at making dumb decisions.” For fellow teachers, there’s the pencil with “You’re awesome” stenciled in one side, and “at jammin’ the copier” on the other. And for parents, there’s the pencil stating, “Yes, your child is gifted.” The other side reads, “at…


Kids’ interest in learning gets a lift at air show, STEM in the Park

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Saturday was a day for kids’ dreams to take flight. For the first time the STEM in the Park and the Wood County Air Show teamed up in their offerings, giving families a double dose of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, and yes, some arts and sports, activities. The result as Saturday’s Take Flight with STEM. Yolanda Robles-Wicks said in past years she’s attended the air show at the Wood County Regional Airport with her children. They see airplanes in the air, and the show gives them a chance to get inside the cockpit and see them close up. “It expands their horizons and shows there’s endless possibilities of what can be created,” she said. This year her children were again on hand, but Robles-Wicks was working. She’s  staff member at the project-based earning school iLEAD in the Holland. This is the public tuition-free charter school’s third year in Ohio, and first year at the air show.. The air fair fits right into what the academy teaches, said Monique Myers, the outreach coordinator. Students learn by doing. The academy was offering a hands-on activity at the air show. Kids got to build construction paper helicopters that had working LED lights in them. Robles-Wicks, a 2009 graduate of BGSU, said the project was selected because it was a change from the usual paper airplane. Over at the Perry Field House, activity spilled out on the lawn. More than 110 different stations were offered. Kara and Lucas Eisenhauer traveled to STEM in the Park from Fremont with their four children, ages 3 to 10. They’d spent almost three hours there and as the event was wrapping up regretted not getting there earlier. They were happy to learn that the air show was still going to be open for a while. Kara Eisenhauer said she was impressed by all the activities that were offered. Every station had something for children of different ages. “Each station seemed to engage everyone,” she said. “This is the most important way to teach kids. Give them a fun, hands-on activity.” She feels so strongly about this kind of learning that she quit her job as a teacher to stay at home to use these methods to…


Sleek Academy won’t have to teach to state tests

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Erica Sleek believes that kids can learn far more by doing. The proof of that is in their enthusiasm, their inquisitiveness, and their creations – not the scores on some state-ordered testing. So Sleek, who has operated All About the Kids learning center for 13 years in Bowling Green, is expanding to offer preschool through high school education at the new Sleek Academy. The academy will practice the same theory Sleek has been using for years – project-based learning. When they are learning about space, they go to the BGSU planetarium. When they are learning about plants, they go to Klotz Greenhouse. When they are learning about produce, they go to an orchard, pick apples and cook up applesauce. “It’s getting them to figure things out themselves,” Sleek said. For example, the older students are in the process of researching how to build a walipini – an underground greenhouse. All About the Kids has had a garden over the years, but a walipini would allow for year-round fruit and vegetable production. The produce would be eaten by students, and the extras would be given to local food pantries, Sleek said. The students are involved in every step of the process. They researched how the garden is built. They wrote letters for seed donations. They are creating a kickstarter video. They are applying for the necessary city permit. And they even researched child labor laws. “They are pretty deep thinkers,” said Kris Westmark, assistant principal. Sleek Academy focuses on STEAM – Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics. But it takes those lessons a step further, Sleek said. “Part of STEAM is giving back to the community,” she said. “We want our students to know their community.” Recently, some of the older students did just that when they visited the Cocoon shelter for people affected by domestic violence. They learned about the services offered. “I was struggling to not cry,” Alexandra, a student, said. The students asked how they could help – and were told the Cocoon residents could use a picnic table for outside. “They had no chairs to sit on outside,” Sara said. “We started researching about abuse in general and how to build a table,” Duncan…


Grandparents find support raising their grandchildren

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The seven strangers sat around the table, not sure where to start. They had at least one common bond – they were all grandparents who are now raising their grandchildren. The reasons varied. Some parents relinquished the rights to their children because of addictions to drugs or alcohol. But regardless of the reasons, the grandparents – who thought their days of daily parenting were done – were now raising another generation of their family. Last week was the first of monthly support group meetings being held for “Grandparents Raising Grandchildren,” at the Wood County Educational Service Center. Most of the grandparents started their stories by apologizing for feeling lost or complaining about their unexpected return to parenting. Felicia Otte, a school and community based prevention specialist liaison with the educational service center, told the grandparents to stop apologizing. “You have every right to feel that way,” Otte told them. That opened the floodgates, relieving the grandparents from guilt, and allowing them to speak freely about their struggles with those who knew exactly what they were talking about. (Because none of them wanted their grandchildren to be embarrassed, they asked that their names not be used.) One grandma talked about raising four grandchildren. One has attention deficit problems, and the specialists haven’t found the right medications to work for him yet. “I get a lot of phone calls from school,” she said. Another woman has found herself in the “sandwich” generation. At the same time she is raising three grandchildren, she is also struggling with the fact that her own mother is slipping and needs to be placed in assisted living. Then was the woman who has raised her teenage grandson since he was a toddler. She was able to offer words of encouragement and support to those just starting the journey. The only grandfather of the group just recently had two grandchildren move in with him per a court order. “It could be till next week or it could be forever,” he said. Another grandma told of taking in her two grandchildren off and on for years. It was just over two years ago that she realized the children were often home alone and taking care of…


Kids don’t let a little rain drown their artistic efforts

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   A little rain can’t deter true artists. Just ask 3-year-old Virginia Rich, who was intent on painting every inch of the wooden airplane she built minutes before. She wasn’t about to let the threat of some raindrops get in her way. “I don’t think it’s keeping people away,” Katie Beigel, youth arts chairperson, said early in the afternoon. “Every once in a while there are a few sprinkles, and then it holds off.” Besides, the kids seemed oblivious to the precipitation. “They are painting in the rain. They don’t care,” Beigel said. The volunteers also came through in spite of the damp drizzling weather. A decision had already been made to cancel the Kiwanis Youth Arts Village for Sunday due to the forecast for heavy rains. “Some of our Sunday volunteers were really awesome and came out today,” Beigel said. Many of the art projects seemed impervious to the wet conditions. The wide brimmed  brown paper hats held up remarkably well in the drizzle. The tie-dyed shirts weren’t harmed. And the construction projects hammered through the sprinkles. Greylin Durbin, 7, of Tontogany, still had her purple hard hat on from making a car from chunks of wood. “I like how they have amazing stuff to build and make,” she said. Her mom, Lindsay Smith, appreciated the effort that goes into incorporating the children in the arts festival. “I think it’s awesome,” Smith said. “They get to build their own hats and cars.” Next, Greylin was headed to the painting station to put a coat on her car. “I’ve always wanted a red car,” she said. Nearby Brady Stierwalt, 7, of Bowling Green, was getting some help from a BGSU construction management student as he built a boat. “Oh my gosh, I love it,” said his mom, Keri Stierwalt. “They get to create things with their own hands.” Dan Stanton, of Bowling Green, was entrusted to carry his kids’ artwork – including an airplane painted with every available color. “We bring them every year, and every year they get to experience something different,” Stanton said. One of Biegel’s goals this year was that kids get a little education about “going green” with their artwork. One of the new…


A real treat – Downtown Halloween and fall festival combined

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green officials have approved plans to serve spirits to adults as young ghosts and goblins take to the streets for trick or treat in the downtown. Plans are underway to combine a fall Firefly Nights with the annual downtown trick or treat on Oct. 19. And on Tuesday evening, Bowling Green City Council approved an F-2 liquor permit, which would allow for the sale of beer and liquor. The city had already issued a liquor permit for the summer Firefly Nights. However, since the October event will cover a larger area downtown, another approval was needed by City Council. The approval was unanimous. “I hear nothing negative,” Council President Mike Aspacher said Tuesday evening about the Firefly Nights events. The decision to combine the Firefly Nights and annual downtown trick or treat was made by downtown merchants due to the overwhelming success of both events. The October event would extend the street festival into the fall and allow for more safety measures for the annual trick or treat. Last year, an estimated 2,000 costumed children filled the downtown sidewalks to collect treats from the local businesses. Concerns were raised about keeping the large streams of children safe. So it was decided the best solution would be to close Main Street for the event. And while the street is closed, why not have a party? The expanded footprint for the Firefly Nights Fall Festival will be along Main Street from Clay Street to Washington Street. That is a block further north than the summer Firefly Nights. Police Chief Tony Hetrick said he is working to find barricades for all the intersections involved to keep vehicles from entering the festival area. “We only have so many police cars,” Hetrick said. Other city vehicles may be used to provide barricades. The fall festival-trick or treat will take place from 6 to 10 p.m. There will be food, music, kids activities, and treats for children. The event will not take the place of the citywide trick or treat.


Downtown BG announces change in trick or treat event

From DOWNTOWN BOWLING GREEN Downtown Bowling Green, OH is excited to announce there are big changes to its annual Downtown Trick or Treat event. Mark your calendar for October 19. Last year about 2,000 children filled the sidewalks to collect treats from the local businesses. It’s an incredible sight to see so many young children dressed up. It also raised some concerns about keeping all the children safe. The best solution was for us to close the street this year. When this was talked about at the Downtown Merchants meeting it was very apparent that if the street was closed we should consider the possibility of having another Firefly Nights. Talks with the Bowling Green Central Business Special Improvement District dba Downtown Bowling Green and the Firefly Nights creators were agreeable and we are moving forward. This will be the Firefly Nights Fall Festival and you can expect to experience music, food, kids activities, and so much more. Don’t worry; there will be plenty of treats for the children too! This will all happen October 19th, 6-10 p.m. on Main Street in Downtown Bowling Green and is taking the place of what was planned for October 26th, not the regular city wide trick or treat. Expect more details to be announced soon.