Community Voices

Earth Month events planned throughout Wood County

April is Earth Month and Wood County and Bowling Green agencies are collaborating to provide multiple events geared toward conservation, education and family fun. The Seventh Annual Community Earth Day Celebration will be the culminating event held on Sunday, April 24th, 2016 from 2-4 pm at the Montessori School of BG, 515 Sand Ridge Road. This free family event has nature science education stations including: a giant Earth Ball, archery, a power-generating bicycle, bookmobile, art projects and crafts, nature walks, various giveaways including live saplings and much more. There is a Passport for the Community Earth Day Celebration that can be picked up at the welcome table on the day of the event. Have the passport stamped at each booth and once complete, turn in the passport to be registered for great giveaways. For a list of the activities during April, please visit www.communityearthday.com. Community Earth Day Celebration booths include the following participants and family-friendly interactive activities: The City of Bowling Green Utilities Division will be providing attendees with the opportunity to generate electricity using the Energy Bike. This stationary bicycle is connected to an electric motor that produces energy to power light bulbs, a radio, a fan and a heater. Through the resistance created by the motor, riders get direct feedback on the energy required to operate each appliance. BG Parks and Recreation will have both an interactive booth and naturalist-led nature walks that are fun for the whole family. Nature walk times are 2:30 and 3:30 pm. Ohio Department of Natural Resources activity: The Maumee State Scenic and Recreational River is an important resource for aquatic organisms and people.  At the ODNR, Scenic Rivers table, families will have an opportunity to see the types of critters that live in the river and how they function as water quality indicators. The Wood County Park District will have multiple activities including: an archery range, pet rock making, a water filtration activity, free program guides and a hands-on craft giveaway. The Wood County District Public Library will have stories, a craft and the earth-friendly bookmobile that runs on compressed natural gas. On the bookmobile, books and media can be checked out using a WCDPL library card. There will also be a special storybook walk of The…


BGSU honors staff & faculty for service

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The University expressed appreciation for the dedicated service of faculty, classified and administrative staff at the annual Employee Years of Service Awards March 30, recognizing those with five to 40 years with BGSU. President Mary Ellen Mazey, Provost Rodney Rogers and Chief Human Resources Officer Viva McCarver praised their contributions and the importance of each person’s role in making the University a success. With 40 years of service was library technical assistant Matt Hungling, who has oversight of the Item Record Database — the computerized record of almost every item in the main library. Hungling began working in the library as a student employee and then transitioned to his full-time job in 1976. Over the past 40 years he has seen many changes in the way things are done, from the old Dewey Decimal System for cataloguing materials to today’s Optimal Character Recognition software. Although his work is primarily behind the scenes, his name may be familiar to patrons and researchers as the donor of the Hungling Disney Collection, more than 700 items from his vast collection of books, movies, music and more. Today they reside in the Curriculum Resource Center, where they may be enjoyed by all. Hungling was the first recipient, in 1986, of the Friends of the Libraries Staff Award.


BCI Lab recognized for energy efficient design

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine and Bowling Green State University President Mary Ellen Mazey announced today that the BCI laboratory on the BGSU campus has earned the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver certification. “Opening the new BCI lab at Bowling Green was an exciting milestone. It added the latest technology and increased capacity to help the crime-fighting efforts of Ohio’s law enforcement agencies,” said Attorney General DeWine. “And this certification confirms that this important work is being done in a facility that is environmentally friendly and energy efficient.” “We’re proud to have the BCI facility on our campus for the opportunities it offers our students and faculty, and especially pleased that it reflects our goal of achieving carbon neutrality and being a good environmental role model for the citizens of Ohio,” BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey said. LEED certification comes from the U.S. Green Building Council – a national green building certification program that recognizes best-in-class building strategies and practices. The LEED certification encompasses numerous categories of energy efficiency and environmentally sound design. For example, the BCI lab is expected to be 14 percent more energy efficient than the standard building baseline, thanks to its HVAC and lighting units, in addition to its windows and insulation. Water consumption is estimated to be more than 40 percent below the standard baseline. In building the 30,000-square foot facility, which opened in 2014, more than 20 percent of the materials cost went toward recycled products. At the same time, construction waste was recycled or reused, diverting more than 90 percent of construction waste from landfills. Indoor air quality is enhanced through the use of low VOC (Volatile Organic Compound) finishes, such as paint and sealants. BCI laboratory services include: Chemistry; Evidence receiving; Firearms and Toolmark Examination; Forensic Biology; Latent Print Analysis; and Trace Evidence Analysis. Investigative services include: Crime Scene Unit; Crimes Against Children Unit; Criminal Intelligence Unit; Special Operations Unit; Special Investigations Unit; and polygraph examination. In addition to the building, the Attorney General’s Office and Bowling Green State University partnered to create the Ohio Attorney General’s Center for the Future of Forensic Science. The Center’s mission is to foster innovative forensic scientific research and to create…


National Walking Day on April 6

American Heart Association Walking Day is Wednesday, April 6, from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., at the BGSU Perry Field House. Celebrate National Walking Day with BGSU, Wood County Hospital, the City of Bowling Green, and Wood County employees. Lace up your sneakers and improve your odds of living a longer, healthier life by joining us for a Poker Walk! Enjoy a healthful bout of exercise with your colleagues, healthy snacks, raffle prizes, and giveaways. POKER WALK – No prior knowledge of poker is needed to participate. Rather than winning based on skill or speed, the top individuals who collect the best poker hand while walking at the Perry Field House track win great prizes, such as a Fitbit®! The Golden Sneaker Award will be awarded to the employer with the highest percentage of walkers. SPIRIT CONTEST- The participating individual or group (office, colleagues, friends, etc) demonstrating the most enthusiasm and spirit wins a free chair massage (up to one hour) for their office or work area walkers. CELEBRITY WALKERS – Dr. Mary Ellen Mazey, President, Bowling Green State University; Mayor Richard Edwards, City of Bowling Green Mayor; Dr. Sidney Childs, Interim Vice-President, Division of Student Affairs; Dr. Nicholas Espinoza, Director, Falcon Health Center; Dr. Marie Huff, Dean, College of Health and Human Services; Craig LaHote, Doris I. Herringshaw and Joel M. Kuhlman, Wood County Commissioners; Andrew Kalmar, County Administrator; Stan Korducki President, Wood County Hospital; Lori Tretter, Municipal Administrator; Monica Moll, BGSU Chief of Police/Director of Public Safety; Viva McCarver, Chief Human Resources Officer.


National Infant Immunization Week approaching

National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW) is an annual observance to highlight the importance of protecting infants from vaccine-preventable diseases and to celebrate the achievements of immunization programs in promoting healthy communities throughout the United States. This year, NIIW is scheduled to be held April 16-23, 2016. Vaccines are among the most successful and cost-effective public health tools available for preventing disease and death. They not only help protect vaccinated individuals, but also help protect entire communities by preventing and reducing the spread of infectious diseases. Among children born during 1994-2013, vaccination will prevent an estimated 322 million illnesses, 21 million hospitalizations, and 732,000 deaths over the course of their lifetimes. Because of the success of vaccines in preventing disease, parents may not have heard of some of today’s vaccines or the serious diseases they prevent. These diseases can be especially serious for infants and young children. That is why it is important to follow the recommended immunization schedule to protect infants and children by providing immunity early in life, before they are exposed to potentially life-threatening diseases. Vaccine-preventable diseases still circulate in the United States and around the world, so continued vaccination is necessary to protect everyone from potential outbreaks. Even when diseases are rare in the U.S., they can still be commonly transmitted in many parts of the world and brought into the country by unvaccinated individuals, putting unvaccinated people at risk. Most parents choose the safe, proven protection of vaccines. Giving babies the recommended immunizations by age two is the best way to protect them from 14 serious childhood diseases, like whooping cough and measles. Parents are encouraged to talk to their child’s doctor to ensure that their baby is up-to-date on immunizations. “National Infant Immunization Week provides a valuable opportunity for our community to tell people how important it is for children to be vaccinated,” said Kathy Teeple, immunization nurse, “Childhood vaccinations are one of the best ways for parents to protect their children against vaccine-preventable diseases.” For more information about National Infant Immunization Week or childhood vaccinations visit http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines or www.woodcountyhealth.org


Kroger named Wood Lane CES employer of month

Community Employment Services (CES) of Wood Lane recently named The Kroger Company (Bowling Green) as their Employer of the Month.  Kroger partnered with CES in becoming a community placement employer in January 1989.  At that time Kroger hired a young woman, receiving CES services, to be a part of the Kroger team as a Courtesy Clerk.  Kroger is one of the largest retailers in the United States and works diligently every day to deliver their values of Honesty, Integrity, Respect, Diversity, Safety and Inclusion. Kroger on North Main Street is currently under an expansive remodel and will be the largest Kroger Marketplace in the Northwest Ohio area when the remodel is completed. For twenty-seven years the employees and supervisors at Kroger have played a supportive role with this individual, and as a result, they have a very competent Kroger team member. The Kroger team approach, where everyone helps each other to accomplish the mission and shared philosophy allows her and her coworkers to truly be part of the Kroger team.  We appreciate The Kroger Company for their dedication in becoming a community placement employer with CES. Since 1985, Community Employment Services has assisted Wood County businesses meet their staffing and diversity needs by offering a pool of qualified and competent workers with developmental disabilities.  Community Employment Services is a division of Wood Lane (Wood County Board of Developmental Disabilities).  For more information, call (419) 352-5059.


BGSU College of Business hosts event on digital entrepreneurship

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The Sebo Series in Entrepreneurship continues to bring innovative and current entrepreneurial leaders to Bowling Green State University. This year’s event on April 8 will feature keynote presenter Dr. John Kelly, who oversees Watson, the IBM supercomputer that answers questions using artificial intelligence to accept and process natural language requests. The Sebo Series will take place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Lenhart Grand Ballroom of the Bowen-Thompson Student Union on campus with Kelly’s talk scheduled for 12:15 p.m. For details visit: https://www.bgsu.edu/business/centers-and-institutes/dallas-hamilton-center-for-entrepreneurial-leadership/e-week/sebo-series-in-entrepreneurship.html Watson wowed the public during its “Jeopardy!” debut when it defeated two of the game show’s top champions. Watson learns about subjects and automatically updates as new information is published, which made its “Jeopardy!” appearance a day-by-day process in which the supercomputer became increasingly better each day as it learned more about the game and subjects. Kelly is the senior vice president at IBM and his top priority is to stimulate innovation in key areas of information technology and to bring those innovations to the marketplace quickly, to apply these innovations to help IBM clients succeed, and to identify and nurture new and future areas for investment and growth. Other featured presenters include William Amurgis, intranet and internal communications specialist; Mark Hosbein, managing director at Accenture; Lisa Mitnick, managing director at Accenture Digital; and Dr. Gene Poor, Hamilton Professor of Entrepreneurship at BGSU. The event will be at the Lenhart Grand Ballroom of the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Reception and networking begins at 8:30 a.m., with the welcome at 9 a.m.Kelly will be the afternoon keynote speaker.  


BGSU Students ‘Hatch’ entrepreneurial ideas

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS In the spirit of “Shark Tank,” 11 student entrepreneurs will pitch their business ideas to alumni investors during The Hatch on April 7 at Bowling Green State University. The event will begin at 6 p.m. in the Lenhart Grand Ballroom at the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. In 2015, The Hatch attracted more than 3,500 attendees and was streamed to watch parties across the United States. “Hatchlings” are paired with alumni mentors throughout the spring semester to develop their business ideas. Participating students and their ideas include: Alyssa Batch, a senior majoring in graphic design, is creating personal comforters for dementia patients to create a conversation between nurses, aids, residents and visitors. Austin Farrington, a senior majoring in marketing, is developing a system that utilizes Bluetooth beacons to set up a “GeoFence” that will help pinpoint the location of individuals who are wearing a Bluetooth bracelet or ID badge in a facility. Collin Newton and Kiersten Castner, both sophomores majoring in marketing and business analytics, are developing a “smart wallet” phone case that will keep track of the customer’s cards. Jarrod Cain, a senior majoring in finance, business analytics and intelligence, and management information systems, is creating a scheduling application that matches students to professors based on course structure. Khory Katz and Meredith Moore, both sophomores majoring in finance and sales and services marketing, are developing an idea of “no-hassle lofted beds,” an easy to use lofting system to transform a small, cramped dorm room into a more functional space. Ryan Murphy, a sophomore, and Baqer Aljabr a senior, are both majoring in engineering technology and mechanical design and are working on an idea of an autonomous robot “rover” that will provide parking security and attendant services in large, ticket-enforced parking lots. Sophia Schmitz, a senior majoring in violin performance, is creating a music reading, theory and aural skills curriculum that is disguised as an active board game. Giuseppe Giammanco, a graduate student studying chemistry, is proposing a bio-friendly alternative to microparticles, called “Nature Beads.” This alternative could replace environmentally unfriendly, banned microparticles in fillers, exfoliates and cosmetic products.


Jim Brown Celebration of Life service

A Celebration of Life service for Jim Brown will be held on Saturday, April 23rd at 11:00 am at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church in Bowling Green. All former Bowling Green Yuletide Singers, Madrigals, and past High School and Jr. High students of Mr. Brown, as well as colleagues and friends, are cordially invited and encouraged to join the Memorial Choir being formed to pay tribute to Jim Brown. There will be two rehearsals of the choral music, to be held at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church on Friday, April 1st 5:45 – 9:00 pm & Friday, April 22nd 6:00 – 8:30 pm. Musical selections for the service are: “Hallelujah Chorus” from Messiah (Handel) “Breathe on Me, Breath of God” (Irish, arr. Haydn Morgan) “Alleluia” (Randall Thompson) “Sing Me to Heaven” (Daniel Gawthrop) Anyone interested in singing is asked to contact Linda Gullufsen at JBMemorialChoir@gmail.com.


BGSU plans to get down with Earth Month activities

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS BGSU is mobilizing the community to get involved with sustainability efforts and issues during April. A full slate of Earth Month events and activities has been planned to raise awareness about and combat the effects of global climate change. Organized by the Office of Campus Sustainability, all the events are free and open to the public. Visit the website for full details. http://www.bgsu.edu/campus-sustainability/earth-month.html In 2015, the University adopted its Climate Action Plan to help meet its goal of being a carbon-neutral institution by 2040 as part of the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment. Students have been active participants in BGSU’s environmental efforts. Among them, the student-led Green Initiatives Fund  provides a pool of money for projects that enhance sustainability at BGSU. In honor of Earth Month, the Environmental Service Club invites others to join its “Adopt-a-Highway Earth Month Edition” on April 16. To learn more about the issues surrounding climate change, the community is invited to attend a guest lecture by Dr. Henry Pollack, a professor emeritus of geophysics at the University of Michigan. He will be presenting a blend of climate science and policy in a talk entitled “Good COP, Bad COP: The Paris Climate Accord,” at 7 p.m. April 18 in the Bowen-Thompson Student Union Theater. Pollack will share his research on how to move forward with public policy even though there is scientific uncertainty. A highlight of the month is always the annual Eco-Fair, on Earth Day, April 20. The fair runs from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Union Oval and features environmental organizations, groups and initiatives from all across the region. Two films will highlight different aspects of environmentalism. “Trashed,” a disturbing documentary about how the Earth’s resources are consumed and wasted, will be shown at 7 p.m. April 14 in 108 Psychology Building. And audiences will be inspired by “Billions in Change,” a documentary about one man’s rise from poverty into wealth and his commitment to improving the environment in the developing world. The screening begins at 7 p.m. April 19 in the Union Theater. More of the month’s events are hands-on. Earth Month kicks off on Friday (April 1) with the “Once Upon a Desk” office supply giveaway, where students,…


BGSU administration, union announce contract agreement

The administration and faculty union have just issued this joint statement: March 30, 2016 Dear Colleagues, We are pleased to share that the University and the BGSU Faculty Association- AAUP have completed negotiations on our second collective bargaining agreement which, when ratified by both BGSU-FA members and the BGSU Board of Trustees, will cover July 1, 2016, through June 30, 2019. As shared in previous joint communications on the bargaining process, both the University and BGSU-FA are committed to producing a fair contract that supports the broader mission of excellence in teaching, research, and service at BGSU. Both teams worked collaboratively and in good faith over the past year to achieve this goal. We elected to use the Interest-Based Bargaining (IBB) approach, which allowed us to reach joint solutions on recommended changes to this proposed successor collective bargaining agreement that met the interests of both parties. The IBB approach allowed us to work collegially to find creative consensus solutions that addressed the issues each party hoped to address. The proposed 2016-2019 Collective Bargaining Agreement between Bowling Green State University and the BGSU-FA will be distributed shortly. The timeline for both parties is to conduct the ratification vote by BGSU-FA members the week of April 18-22; assuming ratification, the Collective Bargaining Agreement would be submitted to the BGSU Board of Trustees for their review and approval at the May 6, 2016, meeting. We extend our thanks to members of both bargaining teams for their hard work over the past year to bring us this proposed contract that we both believe will help us to continue building stronger relations between the University and the BGSU-FA to support the success of BGSU now and in the future. Regards, Mary Ellen Mazey President David Jackson BGSU-FA President


BG curling club to throw last rock at ice arena; plans to move to its own rink

A close follower of today’s athletic scene would be forgiven for wondering:  where have all the amateurs gone—the people who compete solely for the love of the game? Well, they’re at the Bowling Green Curling Club…and they’re thriving.  In fact, on Saturday April 2 from 3:00-3:30, they will gather at the BGSU Ice Arena for a last rock ceremony that will mark a new era in the club’s history. Founded in 1967 by a combination of newbies and imports from the northern United States and Canada, the Club has been throwing rocks at the BGSU Ice Arena for nearly 50 years.  People have come and gone, national championships have been hosted and won, and most importantly lifelong friendships have been made. After the ceremony, the next rock thrown by a member of the Bowling Green Curling Club will be at the Club’s new facility—which it will own.  The new Curling Club will be located in a former commercial building along Rt. 25 north of Bowling Green–which was purchased and is being renovated using money raised from local donors as well as a loan from the United States Curling Association. Claudia Fischer, the club’s sole remaining founding member with uninterrupted membership, will throw the ceremonial last rock at the Ice Arena on behalf of all curlers past and present.


BGSU Lively Arts calendar through April 13

Through April 3—The BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries at BGSU’s Fine Arts Center, and will run through April 3. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free March 30—The Guest Artists series continues with pianists Gulimina Mahamuti and Frank Chiou. The performance begins at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 31—The College of Musical Arts presents a Student Composers Forum, beginning at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 31—The International Film Series continues with the 2014 Russian film ”Leviafan (Leviathan).” Director Andrei Zviagintsev has defended his film as an eternal story against those who saw in it pointed criticism of Russian society. The film follows a family living in a small coastal town in the Murmansk region who confront the mayor, who is trying to take their land and small business. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 2—Bravo! BGSU, a black-tie optional gala, showcases the best of BGSU arts students and faculty. Performances, exhibits, readings and other activities take place throughout the Wolfe Center for the Arts from 7- 10 p.m. Sponsored by PNC, the even raises funds for arts student scholarships. Tickets are $100 per person and are available by contacting the Office of the President at 419-372-6780 or by emailing lmattia@bgsu.edu. For more information, visit bgsu.edu/bravo. April 3—The Sunday Matinee Series continues with “Soundies, Snaders, and Scopitones (1942-67),” a compilation of popular music promotional films that were played on visual jukeboxes and early television from the late 1930s until the early 1970s. Take a tour of the technology, media and culture of these little-known treasures of jazz, rhythm and blues, country and Western, and rock and roll history. The screening begins at 3 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 3—Winners of the 10th annual Doug Wayland Chamber Music Competition will perform at 3 p.m. in the Great Gallery of the Toledo Museum of Art, located at 2445 Monroe St., Toledo. Free April 3—The BGSU Men’s Chorus…


Karen Osborn is a novelist and poet, despite – or perhaps because of – growing up among scientists

By FRANCES BRENT Karen L. Osborn, Distinguished Visiting Professor of Writing at BGSU addressed a young audience gathered on the worn pews of venerable Prout Chapel about her creative “Life on Mars.” The haircuts, hair colors and head coverings were varied, as befits a gathering of the artistic young. It was a comfortable audience for Osborn whose novels explore the difficulties of being young, not in isolation, but rather as part of the continuum of life. (The audience had its mature component too.) The evening was a meditation on the craft of creative writing, with learned and meaningful references to Chekhov, Virginia Woolf, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Robert Frost and Walt Whitman. Interesting, insightful, intellectual and all tied to the Niagara River banks where she grew up – tuned to a dramatic natural environment and within a family that wanted to explain it. The depth, heart of Osborn’s writer’s craft developed as she grew up a “space child” surrounded by a scientific family that didactically and enthusiastically quantified and categorized everything. All this science was the other half – the balance of her creative world. This grounding in the observed world was a platform for her to start wondering about the unseen, to be curious about what could not be explained about human behavior. She is not afraid to explore the Chinese Boxes of the human heart – to follow one unanswerable question to the next as plot and characters develop. “Curiosity, vision and courage,” are required in her view. Karen Osborn, author of four published novels of great individuality, is a successful professional writer. She has the requisite list of foundation grants, awards, small magazine publications, and artists in residence postings that keep writers going. “Patchwork” was named a New York Times notable book. The recent “Centerville” was the fiction choice of The Independent Publishers Books. Osborn describes “Centerville” as a cyclone. The human effect and transformations that circle out from the core explosion of a bomb left by a vengeful husband in a small town drugstore are part of the shockwave. All seems idyllic on a hot summer day in the still innocent sixties. There is a blast and the innocent are dead. It is the living that are left wounded, with lives, selves,…


BGSU Lively Arts Calendar, through April 6

Through April 3—The BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries at BGSU’s Fine Arts Center, and will run through April 3. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free March 29—Viola students of Matthew Daline will perform at the Manor House located at Wildwood Metropark, 5100 W. Central Ave., Toledo. The performance begins at 7:30 p.m. Free March 29 —Tuesdays at the Gish series ends this semester with “Girl, Interrupted” (1999). Director James Mangold’s film follows young Susanna, who gets checked into a psychiatric hospital, where she begins to find herself among new friends and enemies. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free March 29—College of Musical Arts students of tuba and euphonium will perform under the direction of David Saltzmann. The recital begins at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 30—The Guest Artists series continues with pianists Gulimina Mahamuti and Frank Chiou. The performance begins at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 31—The College of Musical Arts presents a Student Composers Forum, beginning at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 31—The International Film Series continues with the 2014 Russian film ”Leviafan (Leviathan).” Director Andrei Zviagintsev has defended his film as an eternal story against those who saw in it pointed criticism of Russian society. The film follows a family living in a small coastal town in the Murmansk region who confront the mayor, who is trying to take their land and small business. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 2—Bravo! BGSU, a black-tie optional gala, showcases the best of BGSU arts students and faculty. Performances, exhibits, readings and other activities take place throughout the Wolfe Center for the Arts from 7- 10 p.m. Sponsored by PNC, the event raises funds for arts student scholarships. Tickets are $100 per person and are available by contacting the Office of the President at 419-372-6780 or by emailing lmattia@bgsu.edu. For more information,…