Community

Helping the county avoid growing pains

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Armed with blue, green and red markers, citizens circled areas of Wood County ripe for development, deserving of preservation, and worthy of reinvestment. They came with different purposes – farmers, developers, elected officials – but with one goal to help chart the direction for land use in the county. “I’m just interested to see what their plan is, and how that’s going to affect me,” said Paul Braucksiek, who lives in rural Webster Township, northeast of Bowling Green. He estimated his township is 99.9 percent agricultural. “And it probably needs to stay that way.” The planning open house Wednesday evening was part of the public input portion of the county’s effort to update the land use plan adopted in 2007. The new plan will consider where zoning changes would be appropriate, where utilities should be expanded, where roadways should be built. The process will also identify areas that should not be developed, but preserved. As people milled about looking at county maps at the planning open house, Braucksiek chatted with Denny Henline, of Pemberville. “I came tonight because I watched Levis Commons and I watched the Golden Triangle,” both areas of retail development in the Perrysburg area, Henline said. While he isn’t opposed to growth, Henline would like to see it directed to areas that are not prime farmland. “For my grandkids, my goal is to have a good vision,” he said. “It just breaks my heart when they come out and gobble up prime farmland. It’s like a runaway horse. You can’t stop a runaway horse.” Henline, however, would like to see more development occur in the Pemberville Road corridor that would encompass Luckey, Pemberville, Bradner and Wayne. But to encourage growth in specific areas, utilities like water and sewer have to head that way. From the southern end of the county came Henry Township Trustee John Stewart, who knows something about planning for development. “We got our planned business district,” by the CSX intermodal hub, Stewart explained. “It’s something other townships should look at.” Alice Brown, who grew up on a farm in Perrysburg Township and now lives in Bowling Green, came to keep an eye on the county’s roadmap…


Cold cooperates with Winterfest…but vandals send ice sculptures packing to park

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   After an atypical winter of almost balmy temperatures, cold weather will cooperate by returning for this weekend’s annual Winterfest in Bowling Green. But while the chilly temperatures will accommodate winter activities, it appears the downtown is just too hot for the ice sculptures that normally decorate Main Street during the annual event. The decision was made this year for the bulk of the ice carvings to be exhibited in City Park. The change was made due to the cost of protecting the sculptures from vandals who have knocked over the ice art during the night previous years. “Anytime we’ve had them up downtown, we’ve lost one or two,” said Wendy Chambers, head of the city’s Convention and Visitors Bureau. Because of the frequency of the vandalism in the past, the city police have provided extra protection for the carvings. In 2014, the cost for two patrolmen during the nights of the Winterfest was $666, according to Police Chief Tony Hetrick. To avoid that cost, last year the police division put two cruisers in the downtown area, and trained volunteers to secure the sculptures, at no charge. But asking people to watch the carvings during the icy hours of the night proved too much for the volunteers, Chambers said. “It’s tough to get volunteers to stay out in those temperatures all night,” Chambers said. And since the ice sculptures are used as a fundraiser for the BG Skating Club, paying for protection was seen as counterproductive. So instead, this year the carvings will be displayed in City Park. But organizers don’t see the move as having a chilling effect on the Winterfest. There will still be a few ice carvings at the courtyard downtown and BGSU Ice Arena. “Spreading them out around town is not a bad thing,” Chambers said. Other events will be spread across the city from the ice arena and the community center, to the library and City Park. There will be horse-drawn carriage rides, ice skating, a chili and soup cook-off, Frostbite Fun Run, youth snow games, Snow Globe Adult Bubble Soccer, family nature hike, Red Cross Fire & Ice Event, and Snow Science with Imagination Station. The downtown…


Curling club to leave BGSU for new site

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   For nearly 50 years, Bowling Green Curling Club has been hurling stones at the BGSU Ice Arena. But the relationship between the ice arena and the curlers has cooled enough that the club is moving out. “There’s a really long history there,” said Shannon Orr, president of the BG Curling Club. For years, the sheet of ice on the south end of the ice arena was dedicated to curling. But recently, the curlers have had to share their ice with expanding hockey and skating programs. And though all the sports are played on sheets of ice, the surface is very different for curlers than for skating. So the curling club, with its more than 100 members, is packing up its brooms and stones and is preparing to set up shop in a new site the group plans to buy or lease north of Bowling Green. “This is a pretty exciting adventure,” Orr said. The new site is the former Perry House furniture building at 19901 Ohio 25. “It’s perfect. It’s huge,” Orr said. The site will have room for four sheets of ice that the club won’t have to share with skaters or hockey. Because of reduced ice time at the BGSU ice arena, the club had lost its weekend curling and time for its youth program. Dave Kielmeyer, spokesman for BGSU, said the university was faced with more demand for limited ice space at the arena. “We’re sad to see them go, but we understand their decision,” Kielmeyer said. “We certainly do our best to meet the ice needs of the community, but we have limited resources.” The problem isn’t just ice time, but also ice preparation time, Orr explained. Once the curling ice is converted for playing hockey, it takes about two hours to make it suitable for curling. Ice with ruts made by skates, or ridges caused by Zambonis, are incompatable with curling, she said. Roger Mazzarella, a member of the curling club, said his team has to relearn how to compete on real curling ice when they travel to other places to play. Like many of the local curlers, he is frustrated by the lack of commitment by…


Recycling efforts grow, but still short in some areas

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   More than 300 local businesses save on garbage pickup costs and conserve landfill space by separating their recyclables from their trash. Businesses from Northwood to North Baltimore use a program operated by Wood Lane’s Community Employment Service, called R&R, to pick up their recyclables. “This is truly intended to be a county-wide program,” said Vic Gable, head of CES. But while the program picks up recyclables for many private businesses, schools and government offices, it collects items from just two apartment complexes in Bowling Green. While the city picks up recyclables at residences, it does not collect them at apartment complexes. During a recent meeting of the Bowling Green City-University Relations Commission, members discussed the lack of recycling at apartment complexes and downtown businesses. Chris Ostrowski, a member of the commission, said he was the first to start apartment recycling in Bowling Green in the 1980s at Summit Terrace, which has 96 units. “We started because it made economic sense,” Ostrowski said. “It was cheaper than having someone pick it up as trash.” Most of the student renters want to recycle, he said. “For the most part, the students see it as a positive thing.” According to Ostrowski, many apartment complexes don’t offer recycling since the owners are responsible for the start-up costs. Unlike other residences, where curbside containers are provided by the city, the apartments would have to purchase the bins. The Wood Lane program partners with the Wood County Solid Waste District to provide recycling containers to school districts throughout the county. The R&R program does not charge for its services, but it does require private businesses to buy their own containers. “One of the challenges with the business community is they have to purchase the containers themselves,” Gable said. “We have to try to break even.” The three trucks used for pickups were purchased with grant funding. Some of the larger corporate customers are Calphalon and Johnson Controls. About 50 small businesses in Bowling Green are involved. But only a few downtown Bowling Green businesses, like Ben Franklin, Finders and Panera, are part of the recycling program, Gable said. “I know there are other entities interested,” he explained. “But…


County wants help with land use plan

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Calling it a land use plan update is somewhat of a misnomer. Dave Steiner sees it more as a chance to make a clean slate for county planning. Wood County is in the process of replacing its existing land use plan that was adopted in 2007. “I just want to toss out what we have and start from fresh,” said Steiner, director of the county planning commission, the office in charge of the land use effort. The plan adopted nine years ago hit a brick wall when the economy tanked. “The recession hit right after that and everything stalled,” Steiner said. But development is picking up again in the county, and a land use plan is needed to help direct that growth to the right areas. The plan will consider where zoning changes would be appropriate, where utilities should be expanded, where roadways should be built. “I’m very pro economic development in the right places and I’m very pro farmland preservation in the right places,” Steiner said. The plan will help guide that growth. “It’s not a set-in-stone document,” Steiner said, but rather a roadmap with suggested directions. But first, the county needs its citizens to give them the directions they would like to see the county develop or preserve. County officials are very aware that development concerns are very different in the southern rural areas than they are in the urban fringe areas in the northern part of the county. So local residents are being invited to express their opinions about the future growth during a public workshop being held by the Wood County Planning Commission on Wednesday from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Junior Fair Building at the Wood County Fairgrounds, 13800 West Poe Road, in Bowling Green. The event is designed to engage participants in discussions on the opportunities and challenges the county may face over the next 20 years. The event will also include exercises for participants to identify critical areas for protection, reinvestment, and growth on maps of the county. A 15-minute reception and sign-in will be followed by small group work for approximately one and a half hours. The event will be led by county…


House for recovering addicts to open

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The average opiate addict relapses seven times before finally being able to shake the addiction. However, if the person gets intensive treatment, the number of relapses drops significantly, according to Tom Clemons, executive director of the Wood County Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services Board. For that reason, the board is helping to set up recovery housing for addicts here in Wood County. The board is working with Zepf Center, which operates rehab centers in the region, to establish a home here that can house eight to 10 men trying to kick drug or alcohol habits. The recovery housing will be set up in an existing home on agricultural land near Cygnet, south of Bowling Green. The exact location of the home was not released. Structured settings are important for people trying the shake addictions, according to Clemons. “They really need to have a living environment free from people using drugs,” he said. Wood County residents needing such treatment have had to travel to the Toledo area for services. There is no such program in Wood County. “The program has a lot of success in Lucas County, but they are full,” Clemons said. “The need is urgent in both men and women,” he said. But this home will just allow men. The board may consider helping with a women’s recovery housing program next. “This is really important for success for a lot of people,” Clemons said. “We were looking for how we can meet the need.” Zepf Center will pay for the capital costs, and WCADAMHS will pay for the services provided. That will cost an estimated $280,000 a year. The men accepted at the center will have addictions to alcohol or drugs such as opiates or cocaine. They will be tested frequently to make sure they are complying with rules. “They have to stay clean and sober,” Clemons said. They will be required to participate in treatment programs and follow the plans. The average stay at recovery housing programs is 3.5 months, though longer stays often have better results. Most of the residents at the center will have jobs or work in vocational rehabilitation. “It’s not a jail,” Clemons stressed….


More than 3,800 landowners to be assessed for creek cleanup

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   A creek maintenance project that cuts across Wood County will affect the owners of more than 29,000 acres here that drain into the waterway. Wood County is working with Sandusky and Ottawa counties to clear blockages in the Toussaint Creek, which starts on the north side of Bowling Green, and winds its way north of Luckey on its way to Lake Erie. The total cost for the maintenance, which was petitioned by Wood County landowners, is about $860,000. The cost will be divided among landowners of acreage in the Toussaint Creek watershed area. More than 3,800 notices have been mailed out to the landowners who will be assessed, said Wood County Administrator Andrew Kalmar. The cost and acreage in each county is estimated as follows: 29,204 acres in Wood County, costing $608,000 7,763 acres in Sandusky County, costing $123,000 12,982 acres in Ottawa County, costing $131,000 Some people receiving the assessment notices may not even realize they are in the watershed, since the creek may not be visible from their property, Kalmar said. But that doesn’t mean it’s not draining into the waterway, he added. So far, 199 objections to the project or the assessments have been filed. The petition for the work, which is being handled by the soil and water districts of the three counties, asks for the removal of log jams and leaning trees along the creek. There will be no channelizing, or moving of dirt, Kalmar explained. A public meeting will be held on the project, but has not yet been scheduled. “Everyone will have the opportunity to speak their piece,” Kalmar said. The creek cleanup won’t start until fall, after this year’s crops have been harvested.    


Siblings wear memorial for their father, Glenn Haught, on their skins

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News As a leathersmith, Glenn Haught knew something about needles. Haught, a longtime fixture in Bowling Green where he repaired shoes and leather items of all sorts, died Jan. 27. On Tuesday his daughter, Melissa Marshall and his son, Gerald Haught, got a taste of a different kind of needle when they visited Broad Wing Tattoo in downtown Bowling Green to get matching tattoos to honor their father’s legacy. Marshall credited her brother with the idea. He’s no stranger to the shop nor tattoo artist Jaime Mullholand. She’s worked her craft numerous times on Haught’s arms. The memorial tattoo is his seventh. He has an autobiography in ink on his arms. He already has a tattoo to honor his father, one depicting his signature hat and boots. There’s an image for each of his family members, including his mother, Linda, who assisted her husband with jobs requiring stitching on bags, purses and other items. Marshall does have one tattoo. It dates back before her marriage. Her husband, Jack, is not fond of tattoos. But, she said, he made an exception for the one that will adorn her right ankle. The image replicates the metal silhouette included on the community mural on the corner of East Poe Road and College Street. It shows Glenn Haught at work at his bench. When asked about their father, both Gerald Haught and his sister recall him as a man who worked hard at a job he loved. While known for shoe repair, his craft wasn’t limited to footwear. He repaired hockey gear, the bellows for an antique furnace in Pemberville and the top for the gear shift on a BMW. Though suffering from the leukemia and lymphoma that would claim his life, Glenn Haught still planned to go back to work after the Christmas holiday. Haught, who was born in West Virginia in 1941, never returned to his bench. The family will close the business and sell the equipment. Some pieces of gear, including a 100-year-old sanding and polishing machine that Marshall referred to as “the monstrosity,” are no longer made. Haught didn’t start his working life in the leather trade. Marshall said he was a repo man with…


Baby won’t stop crying? Don’t shake. Walk away.

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Sometimes there is just no soothing a crying baby. Nothing works. Not rocking. Not feeding. Not a midnight car ride. Nothing. When you can no longer remain calm, the experts advise that you walk away. “Babies don’t die from crying. Put them in a safe place,” and then leave the room, advised Brandy Laux, assessment supervisor with Wood County Children’s Services. Call a responsible friend or family member for help. Never let your frustration reach the level that you shake the baby. “One time of shaking can be fatal,” Laux explained. To help prospective and new parents understand the risks of shaking babies, Children’s Services has adopted a new baby that shows how easy it is to damage a baby’s brain by shaking. Depending on how hard the doll is shaken, areas of the head light up to show where damage could occur. The red lights show if the shaking is affecting the baby’s vision, speech, cognitive thinking, or control of arms and legs. “Their heads move much more easily than ours,” Sandi Carsey, director of Children’s Services, said about infants who haven’t yet developed neck control. “Places will light up in the brain and eyes. This will show what part of the brain was damaged.” Children’s Services is trying to reach out to parents before it’s too late. “The people who shake a baby aren’t your violent criminals,” Laux said. “It’s the people who flip out of frustration.” The doll will be used in demonstrations to new parents at the hospital and to high school students. “Those kids are future parents and they babysit,” Carsey said. It’s not uncommon for some infants to cry for five to seven hours a day, according to Laux. And it often has nothing to do with the parenting. “Don’t be afraid of your baby crying,” Laux said. “It’s normal, but obviously frustrating.” Previously, the shaken baby syndrome lesson was taught using an egg cracked into a Rubbermaid container. If the container is dropped or rolled off furniture, the yolk consistently remains intact. But if shaken, it breaks. The frequency of shaken baby syndrome cases varies in Wood County. Last year there was one. But in…


Corner Grill plans to reopen

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The owner of the Corner Grill hopes to be back serving burgers within three months. Larry Cain said Wednesday that because of water and smoke damage caused by a fire Monday morning the interior of the eatery will pretty much have to be gutted. He will try to save some signature elements such as the countertops. Still the nostalgic will be the same. Firefighters were called to the grill shortly before 8 a.m. Monday as the crew was preparing to open. Flames shot up from behind a grill as it was heating, and that fire extended into the hood, and from there into an abandoned stairwell next to the building through which the grills ventilated. That structure is owned by Jim Gavarone who operates Mr. Spots next door. The fire also temporarily closed Mr. Spots, but that restaurant is back operating. Cain said because of the damage from the fire that stairwell will now have to be removed. That’s one of the factors that will play into when the Corner Grill is back in operation. The grill itself will get a facelift, and all that work will have to be inspected and approved by the county. “That’s always the biggest thing, making sure things get codified,” Cain said. Much of the work, including getting new equipment, was already planned, but had been put off because of the vagaries of financing and operating a small business. Now that work will be done, and the new Corner Grill will be even better, he said. The owner said he was touched by the support he’s received. Howard Club H, just a couple doors down on North Main Street, will hold a benefit for the Corner Grill Saturday from 2 p.m. until Sunday at 2 a.m. But afterward the club’s patrons will not be able to make their usual stop at the Corner Grill for after-hours sustenance. And the Cookie Jar, around the corner on East Court Street, is also donating a portion of its receipts to help get the eatery back open. Cain appreciates the way “the community rallied around us … The customers are great. Suppliers have been positive.” “This is our home,” he said. “People…


Chris Buzzelli still in tune with jazz

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Chris Buzzelli didn’t change his tune when he retired. A guitar professor and director of the Bowling Green State University Jazz Vocal Group, Buzzelli retired from the university last May after teaching there since 1984. While he keeps active as a guitarist, he’s also wanted to maintain a hand in vocal music. So this summer he got together a few former students for a concert at the Hayes Home in Fremont. This Saturday, the group billed as Chris Buzzelli and Friends will perform at the Pemberville Opera House at 7:30 p.m. as part of the Live in the House series. Tickets are $12 at the door or at Beeker’s General Store in Pemberville or by calling Carol Bailey at 419-287-4848. Joining Buzzelli, who sings and plays guitar, for the show will be vocalists Samantha Ulrich, Emily Holsoe and David Breen with instrumental support from Ariel Kasler, piano, and Kevin Eikum, bass. “This is kind of my ideal group,” Buzzelli said. “I get to play, to sing, to write. It contains all my interests.” Buzzelli didn’t seek out the job of directing the jazz vocal group. Paul Hunt had done it for a number of years and when he left there were a couple short-term directors. When one of them stepped aside on short notice, Dean Richard Kennell asked Buzzelli to take over. “I said I would until he found someone else.” It became a long-term commitment. “I loved doing the group at the school and I’ve gotten into a lot of arranging and getting my arrangements published. It became an unexpected part of my career.” He’s also started singing as well. For a while he had a Nat King Cole tribute group with Eikum on lead vocals and bass, and Buzzelli joining the vocal choruses. When he retired Buzzelli decided he’d like to have a group to express that side of his musical personality. To get started he is relying on charts the singers knew from their time with the university’s ensemble, though “everyone had to learn a couple new things.” The program will be a mix of his own arrangements as well as charts from the books of Manhattan Transfer and the New…


Otsego graduate to receive Medal of Honor

Edward Byers, a Navy Seal who graduated from Otsego High School, will receive the nation’s highest honor later this month. The White House has announced that Byers, a senior chief special warfare operator, will receive the Medal of Honor from President Barack Obama on Feb. 29. According to the White House press release: “Senior Chief Byers will receive the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions while serving as part of a team that rescued an American civilian being held hostage in Afghanistan on December 8-9, 2012. “Senior Chief Byers will be the eleventh living service member to be awarded the Medal of Honor for actions in Afghanistan. He and his family will join the President at the White House to commemorate his example of selfless service.” Byers, 36, graduated from Otsego High in 1997. He enlisted in 1998 and trained as a corpsman. He has served in seven combat deployments earning numerous awards and decorations including five Bronze Stars and two Purple Hearts. He is continuing his education at Norwich University in Vermont where he will receive Bachelor of Science in Strategic Studies and Defense Analysis later this year.


Senior levy renewal to help meet growing needs

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   More than 20 percent of Wood Countians are over 60 years old. To help that growing group stay at home and independent as long as possible, the Wood County Committee on Aging is again looking for voters’ support. Here are some numbers to chew on. The Committee on Aging provided approximately 200,000 meals to seniors last year. As baby boomers age, the numbers of seniors will continue to grow beyond the current 21,443. Approximately 6,500 of those seniors received services last year. By the year 2025, the senior population is predicted to hit 35,000. The number of those over 85 is expected to increase dramatically, providing other challenges. Those numbers add up to the Wood County Committee on Aging seeking approval to put a 0.7-mill renewal levy on the November ballot. The county commissioners listened to the board’s pitch on Tuesday and will rule on the request soon. What doesn’t quite add up, is that the WCCOA is asking for a renewal, even though their costs and demands for their services are growing. But Jim Stainbrook, director of fiscal and facility operations, explained that the board wanted to avoid asking the taxpayers for more. So while the grants and tax revenue have been flat recently, the board decided to turn to its reserves rather than ask more of local taxpayers. “We’ve held back monies,” for situations like this, Stainbrook told the commissioners. “In doing that, we can keep the levy the same as it has been.” The WCCOA is planning to use about $3 million of its $6 million reserves. The rest of its funding will come from the tax levy, which brings in about $2 million a year. About 20 percent of the board’s funding also comes from federal and state funding, and another 10 percent in fees and donations. Denise Niese, director of WCCOA, talked about the programs that the dollars help provide. She spoke of the nutritional, educational, health and transportation programs that help local seniors remain in their homes. “Senior programs do make a difference. We touch lives,” Niese said. In addition to the senior center in Bowling Green, there are satellite centers operated in Rossford, Perrysburg, North…


Pregnant women advised to avoid travel to Zika virus areas

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Women who are pregnant, or intending to get pregnant, are being advised to restrict their travel to avoid the Zika virus. The Wood County Health District is following CDC instructions and suggesting travel to the Caribbean, Central America and South America be avoided for pregnant women. No vaccine exists for the Zika virus, which has been connected with cases of microcephaly (small heads with incomplete brain development) in infants. Anyone with concerns about traveling can check out the CDC’s website for any travel health notices at  http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices In December 2015, Puerto Rico reported its first confirmed Zika virus case. Some Zika cases have been reported by people returning to the U.S. from international travels, but the virus has not yet been transmitted in the U.S. “There is no evidence anyone that has Zika in the U.S. got it in the U.S. They all traveled to other areas,” said Pat Snyder, of the Wood County Health District. The virus is spread by mosquitoes. But according to Snyder, the type of mosquito known to transmit Zika is rarely seen in this region. “It’s not too common in Ohio,” she said. “That doesn’t mean that couldn’t change.” The virus is primarily a concern for pregnant women. “Most people inflicted with the virus have no symptoms,” Snyder said. The most common symptoms of the Zika virus are fever, rash, joint pain, conjunctivitis (red eyes), muscle pain and headaches. The illness is usually mild, lasting for several days to a week. People traveling to areas where the virus has originated should take precautions, according to the health district. Mosquitoes that spread Zika virus bite mostly during the daytime. So people are advised to use insect repellents, and wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants if weather permits. They are also advised to use air conditioning or window/door screens to keep mosquitoes outside, or sleep under a mosquito bed net if necessary. General Zika Info:   http://www.cdc.gov/zika/ Fact Sheets: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/fs-posters/index.html


East Side may get revitalization plan

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Neglected and abused housing on Bowling Green’s East Side may soon be addressed in a revitalization plan. Bowling Green City Council heard the first reading Monday evening of a plan to contract with consultants to develop a strategic revitalization plan for the northeast and the southeast neighborhoods of the city. “We’ve been talking about the need to revitalize these neighborhoods,” council member Daniel Gordon said after the meeting. The decline of the housing stock around Bowling Green State University has been going on for years, Gordon said. “The city has not intervened,” he said. Much of the traditional single family housing has been converted into rental units. “When you have that unbalance created,” the housing problems worsen, Gordon said. Council member Sandy Rowland said she has been a strong advocate of getting the revitalization plan moving. “I know what the situation on the East Side is with housing,” she said. Since she works in the real estate industry, Rowland said she is aware the problems don’t stop at Main Street which divides the east and west sides of the city. “It affects the entire city,” she said, after the meeting. When the city recently updated its land use plan, the consultant ranked revitalization of the East Side was high on the priority list, Rowland said. More and more of the single-family homes close to the university are being converted into rentals. “And when those wonderful homes are turned into rentals, they rapidly deteriorate.” Consequently, fewer and fewer homes appeal to young couples and young professionals looking to purchase homes, Rowland said. Gordon is hoping that the revitalization plan is more than conceptual and has some real teeth. One possibility would be the creation of revolving loans for homeowners wanting to spruce up their structures. “There have to be some incentives,” Rowland said.