Music

Roomful of Teeth brings sound of world’s many voices to BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Roomful of Teeth is an ensemble of eight voices that creates world of sound. They were pulled together in 2009 by choral conductor and composer Brad Wells who was interested in expanding the potential of the human voice, said mezzo-soprano Virginia Warnken. After auditions in New York City, the eight singers convened at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, in North Adams, Massachusetts, where they delved into a range of vocal techniques – yodeling, Broadway belting, and throat singing, both Mongolian and Inuit, to name a few. They have worked those techniques into a distinctive sound that inspired a Pulitzer Prize winning composition, “Partita for 8 Voices” by ensemble member Caroline Shaw and been captured on a Grammy-winning album. Roomful of Teeth will bring their globally influenced sound to Bowling Green State University Feb. 22 and 23 as the Hansen Musical Arts Series featured artist. The ensemble’s residency will culminate in a free concert Thursday, Feb. 23, at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall. The ensemble will also present a voice master class, Feb. 22 from 4:30-6 p.m. in the Conrad Choral Room at the Wolfe Center for the Arts and discuss writing for the voice with student composers that evening from 7:30-9 p.m. in Kobacker. The members will participate in a panel discussion Feb. 23 from 10:30-11:30 p.m. also in Kobacker. Having incorporated these disparate techniques along with traditional Western chorale sounds, the ensemble then commissioned composers to write pieces for them. “It was really exciting. None of us knew what would happened,” Warnken said. What happened was Roomful of Teeth established itself as one of the premier new music ensembles in the world.  “I don’t think any of us thought it would become this big.” Most of what they perform is the result of a close collaboration with the composer, she said. Seldom do they simply receive a finished score that the singers have not seen in draft form. That’s essential given the mix of sounds the ensemble commands. “We’re definitely one of a…


Library closed for Presidents’ Day; ukulele jam, Feb. 19

From THE WOOD COUNTY DISTRICT PUBLIC LIBRARY The Wood County District Public Library in Bowling Green and Walbridge, and the library Bookmobile will be closed Monday, February 20 in observance of Presidents’ Day. Calling all ukulele enthusiasts looking for a friendly and helpful group to play ukulele with. Look no further: the popular Ukulele Club, led by members of the Grand Royale Ukulelists of the Great Black Swamp (GRUBS), returns to Wood County District Public Library Sunday, February 19 at 3 pm. To participate in the group’s jam session, all you need is a ukulele and sense of adventure. Song books and music provided at the jam. RSVP appreciated (419-352-5050), but not required. 1st Floor Meeting Room.


Artistry awarded at Dubois piano competition at BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Pianist Chu-Fang Huang, the special guest artist at this weekend’s David D. Dubois Piano Festival and Competition, puts a lot of emphasis on telling a story through music. That was evident during her recital Saturday night when she talked at length before each piece about the stories and poems that inspired them, and then brought those stories to life in her playing. Chi Zhang, a 17-year-old from Lawrence, Kansas, won the competition. Asked which of the four on his program was his favorite, he cited Chopin’s Ballade No. 3. “It’s just so beautiful,” he said. “There are so many beautiful harmonies. It’s like a winding story, a story unfolding, so romantic, so much feeling, a lot of love.  There’s everything in it — storminess, happiness. It’s just beautiful.” The high school junior topped a field of 26 semifinalists over the weekend. In Saturday’s semifinal round, the field was winnowed to eight finalists, who performed in Kobacker Hall Sunday morning. As winner he was awarded $3,000. Yu-Lien The, who teaches piano at Bowling Green State University and judged both rounds this weekend, said “I was just amazed” by the competitors. “I was impressed. It was just a really high level. I don’t think I played like that.” She said she wanted to give every one of the finalists an award. BGSU faculty Robert Satterlee and Thomas Rosenkranz also judged, and Laura Melton coordinated the event which is sponsored by the David D. Dubois Trust. Huang said of the finalists: “They don’t sound like under 18 at all.” The judges were unanimous in selecting the top five with more discussion needed to then rank them, she said. She said she was “shocked” at the level of talent the Dubois festival draws. She had brought two of her own students with her to compete, one of whom made the finals, and said to expect to see more of her students in future years. At this level, competitions are “cruel,” she said. If a pianist makes the smallest…


BGSU Arts Events through Feb. 21

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Feb. 9—The Elsewhere Season begins with “The Winter Barrel,” written and directed by film faculty member Dr. Eileen Cherry-Chandler. The staged reading will begin at 8 p.m. in the Marjorie Conrad M.D. Choral Room, located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Feb. 11—The David D. Dubois Piano Festival and Competition features guest artist Chu-Fang Huang. Winner of a 2011 Avery Fisher Career Grant, Huang debuted as a finalist in the 2005 Van Cliburn Piano Competition and as First Prize Winner of the Cleveland Piano Competition that same year. In 2006, she won a place on the Young Concert Artist roster. Her performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets are $7 call 419-372-8171  or online at http://www.bgsu.edu/the-arts.html. Feb. 12—The David D. Dubois Piano Festival and Competition will start at 9 a.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. The annual event supports student pianists by providing scholarships for high school students to attend BGSU, encouraging undergraduate students to develop innovative programming ideas for outreach projects and supporting current piano students to participate in music festivals around the world. Free Feb. 14—Music at the Manor House features BGSU violin students. The performance will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Manor House in Wildwood Metropark, 5100 W. Central Ave., in Toledo. Free Feb. 14—Tuesdays at the Gish continue with the 1968 film “Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One,” directed by William Greaves. This film on the making of a film involves three camera crews capturing the process and personalities (director, actors, crew, bystanders) involved. Led by visionary auteur William Greaves, the collective project also depends on his multi-racial crew, who stage an on-set rebellion that becomes the film’s drama and platform for sociopolitical critique and revolutionary philosophy. Filmed in Central Park, the film is a vivid document of this historical period and moment in American independent cinema. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free…


Teen pianists selected to compete in Dubois Festival at BGSU (Update)

The David D. Dubois Piano Festival and Competition has selected 28 young pianists as semifinalists to compete Saturday, Feb. 11, with finals Sunday, Feb. 12 at Bowling Green State University’s Moore Musical Arts Center. All events will take place in Bryan Recital Hall. The pianists will compete for a top prize of $3,000, with $2,000 for second and $1,000 for first. The festival’s guest artist will be pianist Chu-Fang Huang. Huang will present a master class Friday from 2:30–4:30 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall and she will perform a solo recital Saturday at 8 p.m.  Contact 419-372-8171,  or online at http://www.bgsu.edu/the-arts.html for tickets. She will also judge the finals on Sunday. The teenage pianists come from 10 states and Ontario. The semifinalists were selected based on a video recording submitted to the festival. The pianists prepare a program of 20 to 30 minutes in length that includes selections from at least three of four style periods – Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Contemporary. One movement from a Classical sonata is required. All works must be memorized with the exception of those written after 1945. The semifinals will be held Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center on campus. Those selected as finalists will perform Sunday beginning at 8:30 a.m. Recipient of a 2011 Avery Fisher Career Grant, Huang burst onto the music scene as a finalist in the 2005 Van Cliburn Piano Competition, and as First Prize Winner of the Cleveland Piano Competition that same year.  In 2006, she won First Prize in the Young Concert Artists International Auditions and made critically acclaimed debuts at Carnegie’s Zankel Hall and at the Kennedy Center in the Young Concert Artists Series. Huang has performed in Canada on the Vancouver Recital Society Series, in Australia with the Sydney Symphony Orchestra and the Australian Chamber Orchestra, in China with the Sichuan Symphony Orchestra and the China, Shenzhen, and Liaoning Philharmonic Orchestras, at the famed Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, the Ruhr Piano Festival in Germany, the Mustafa Kemal Center in Istanbul,…


Bruce Moss named OMEA Outstanding Educator

By Marie Dunn-Harris ’95 From BGSU MARKETING &COMMUNICATIONS Ask any BGSU music student, past or present, who Dr. Bruce Moss is and chances are you will hear nothing but praise and admiration. Moss, a professor and the director of band activities for 23 years in Bowling Green State University’s College of Musical Arts, was named Ohio Music Education Association’s (OMEA) 2017 Most Outstanding Educator of the Year. The award recognizes and honors an OMEA member each year for his or her outstanding service, dedication and overall contribution to music education. The finalists need at least six nomination letters to be considered for the honor, and Dr. Moss had 65. “I was surprised and humbled beyond words when seeing the long list of names of former students and peers from all over the country who wrote letters on my behalf,” Moss said. The list of people who nominated Moss is impressive. Some are former colleagues, but many are students who have gone on to pursue successful music careers. One of them is U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Ryan Nowlin, assistant director of “The President’s Own” U.S. Marine Band. Nowlin studied with Moss for his undergraduate and graduate degrees. In his letter, Nowlin said, “Dr. Moss’s selfless commitment to students, stalwart advocacy for music education, personal and professional integrity, genuine care and concern for student growth, development and success, and his high level of musicianship make him a role model, mentor and tireless devotee to all fortunate enough to study under his baton.” Another world-class musician and nominator is John Hagstrom, a trumpet student of Moss when he taught public school. He now performs in the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. “As I look back at the most important influences on my early development it is clear to me that Bruce Moss was crucially important for my tenacity and honest improvement despite many obstacles,” Hagstrom said. “His focus on quality and finding solutions models a strategic mind-set that I have emulated along with many of his other successful students. “That Bruce Moss is an outstanding…


BG revelers raise their glasses and voices in memory of Robert Burns

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News   All we needed Friday night was Robert Burns processing into Naslada Bistro with the haggis. After all, we had bagpipes, and plenty of tartan, including Bulgarian chef Boyko Mitov clad in a tam o’ shanter, sash and kilt of Royal Stewart. And he wasn’t the only one baring his manly gams. Later there would be poetry and song, and traditional Scottish dishes, and of course, many rounds of whisky. The occasion was a celebration of the birth of Robert Burns, and if the bard of Scotland and bawdy bon vivant was absent is body – being dead some 220 years is a good enough excuse– he was certainly there in spirit. This is the second annual Burns Night held at the downtown restaurant. Or, as host Elliot MacFarlane said, the second and a half. Another Burns night was held Thursday. Demand for the first in 2016 prompted Mitov and MacFarlane to present it two nights this year. Burn Night Dinners are a tradition dating back to shortly after the poet’s death. Now on the face of it, a night devoted to the poetry and song of a long dead personage, with interlude grandly titled “The Immortal Memory” may sound a bit staid. The event was nothing of the sort. Haunch to haunch with the poetry and sentimental ballads were bawdy jokes. A Burns Night Dinner, MacFarlane said, was a time for flatulence and rude talk about the English. After uttering his first “fuckin’” while telling a story, he advised the several dozen gathered that the word was Scottish for “jolly.” The dinner was a jolly time. In the old days, he said, the dinners could last for eight hours, and boys with wheelbarrows would be on hand to push the revelers home afterward. The Bowling Green event ended with everyone raising their voices in a chorus of “Auld Lang Syne.” The frivolity began well before the first round of whisky, and only heightened with each succeeding shot. “We need something in winter in…


Kesha and The Creepies electrify crowd in Bowling Green

By  ANNIE GALLO Special to BG Independent News Kesha is back at it again with her band “The Creepies” as she kicked off her first concert of 2017 Friday night at Bowling Green University’s Stroh Center. Kesha and the Creepies took the stage as a part of the Bands4Change charity concert. By choice of the artist, all proceeds went to the National Eating Disorder Association, Humane Society International and RAINN (Rape, Abuse, Incest National Network).   Though she has been struggling with a legal battle for the past two years, that did not stop her from performing a kickass show and providing support to those struggling with accepting the new president.  In between performing rock renditions of older songs, Kesha talked about how she will fight for human rights even if our new president doesn’t. “I’m with you, I’m standing beside you, I’m standing behind you, and we will not ever give up,” Kesha said.   After speaking those words her band started to play “Your Love Is My Drug.” She belted out all the lyrics enthusiastically as her boyfriend Brad Ashenfelter danced around her with a gay pride flag. From singing old songs like “Tik Tok” to newer songs like “Timber” Kesha gave it her all on stage and showed fans a different side of her. The most heartbreaking, but captivating moment of the concert was when Kesha sang a cover of the song “You Don’t Own Me” by Leslie Gore. With every word that came out of her mouth you could feel her vulnerability and the pain she has been going through. She told the crowd Friday she has 72 newly recorded songs she cannot wait to release and she said she is fighting every day to give her fans new music. “I know I was put on Earth to do this with you guys and I will not let that get f*****g taken away from me,” she said. After attending a Kesha and The Creepies concert it is clear to see that Kesha has not only the…


Greek accordion virtuoso Panagiotis Andreoglou in residence at BGSU

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Early in her 2014 stay in Thessaloniki, Greece, as a Fulbright Scholar at the Municipal Conservatory at Thermi, Dr. Elainie Lillios, a music composition faculty member specializing in electroacoustic music, attended a concert featuring accordion music. One Greek performer was playing Luciano Berio’s “Sequenza XIII” for accordion, and Lillios found herself “transfixed by the young accordion player. He was amazing.” That was the start of her acquaintance with Panagiotis Andreoglou. Not only is he an accomplished and riveting musician who has given the world premieres of many solo and chamber music works in concerts throughout Europe, but he also shares Lillios’s interest in contemporary and electroacoustic music. The friendship begun in Greece has now resulted in Andreoglou coming to Bowling Green State University as a Fulbright Scholar for the spring semester. “The goal of the Fulbright Program is to meet people and exchange ideas,” he said. “I think with this we are achieving that.” He is working with faculty and students in the College of Musical Arts’ highly regarded program in contemporary music. It is turning out to be a comfortable and productive fit, both personally and professionally. “I feel this is the proper place for my interest,” he said. In addition to the interaction with faculty and students, he finds that the facilities are excellent. “The electroacoustic studios are very fine. I’m very happy to be here,” he said. Area audiences will get to experience his exciting performance on Feb. 7, when he gives a free Guest Artist Series concert at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at Moore Musical Arts Center. The program will feature his playing of solo works for accordion and electronics. That will be the first of three presentations planned during his stay. His second public appearance will be a talk on Feb. 10 at a seminar for composition students, where he will share information about the accordion and present its possibilities. Andreoglou plays the classical, or concert, accordion, a larger version than the style used to play…


BGSU arts events through Feb. 8

From BGSU MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Jan. 25 – The Faculty Artist Series presents pianist Robert Satterlee. He has appeared on the Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concerts in Chicago, San Francisco’s Old First Concert Series and the Schubert Club in St. Paul, Minn., among others. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 26 – The Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series features graduate students Sam Adams and Dan Gualtieri. They will present their work at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Jan. 26 – BGSU’s Jazz Lab Band I will perform with guest artist and saxophonist, Loren Stillman. Stillman has received praise in such publications as The New York Times, Downbeat magazine, Jazziz, Jazz Times, and on National Public Radio,marking him as an innovative voice of modern jazz. His original recordings have received critical acclaim from The New York Times and four star recognition in BBC Jazz Review, Jazz Man magazine and Downbeat. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171 or visit www.bgsu.edu/arts. Advance tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for students and children. All tickets the day of the performance are $10. Jan. 27 – Students in the BGSU dance program will present a concert at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre of the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Tickets are $5 at the door. Jan. 27 – The College of Musical Arts Guest Artist Series features “Schubert, Songfulness and the Body,” a lecture/recital by pianist Arved Ashby, a professor of music at Ohio State University. Ashby focuses on 20th- and 21st-century art music within broader contexts of cultural history, critical theory, post-Marxist aesthetics, and media and communications. He is the editor of “Listening to Modernism: Intention, Meaning, and the Compositional Avant-garde” (Rochester, 2004) and author of “Absolute Music, Mechanical Reproduction.” In 1996, Ashby received the prestigious Alfred Einstein Award from the American Musicological Society. The lecture…


BG foundation gives grants to community groups

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Community organizations were given grants earlier this week to bring music, sports, reading and more to Bowling Green. The grants, from the Bowling Green Community Foundation, are intended to help the very young to the very old, and everyone in between. The annual grant program began after the 1993 BG Leadership class started the foundation in order to help local groups serve the community, explained Cal Bowers, president of the foundation. “What you’re doing speaks to the vibrancy of our community. You’re at the core of it,” said Bowling Green Mayor Dick Edwards. This year’s grants total $29,000 for 14 different projects. “That’s an impact to this community,” Bowers said. Following is a list of all the projects awarded grants. BG Area Community Bands – $2,250 for a community band festival. “This is our 10th year as a community band. We feel we have become a staple in the community,” said Ardy Gonyer. “We’re very grateful for the support of Bowling Green.” Thom Headley explained the grant will help the band put on a concert with a guest conductor on May 6. BG City Schools – $1,000 for One Book BG literacy program. Two third grade teachers, Jeni Niekamp and Jonelle Semancik explained the grant will help the schools purchase books for every pre-kindergarten through fifth grade student. The reading program unites families and the community around one common book. “It’s created to promote a love of learning,” Semancik said. BG Parks and Recreation Department – $5,000 for the natural obstacle course. Ivan Kovacevic, of the parks and rec department, said the outdoor obstacle course behind the community center has already been the site of the Zombie Mud Run last fall. BG Parks and Recreation Department – $5,000 for waterpark splashpad creature. The splashpad additions help complete the area for the youngest pool users. “They are both really true community projects,” Kovacevic said of the pool and obstacle course. BG Youth Hockey Association – $1,100 for rink system upgrade. The hockey program…


Cornel West sings the praises of Dr. King at BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Martin Luther King Jr. is no Santa Claus. Cornel West, an activist and philosopher, told his audience at Bowling Green State University Thursday night,  to resist efforts “to defang him,” to make King some lovable figure, a benign old man with a bag of toys on his back. “Don’t Santa-Clausify, my brother,” West said. “In a celebrity-scented culture, so obsessed with feeling comfortable … we just want to hear something that makes us feel good. If that’s the case you got the wrong Negro with Martin Luther King Jr. He wanted you to feel empowered, challenged, so you can straighten your back up.” As beloved as the civil rights leader is today, he was not in his time, West said. Right before his death, 72 percent of Americans disapproved of King, and that included 55 percent of African-Americans. FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover considered him “the most dangerous man in American.” King was a “love warrior,” West said. “Justice is what love looks like in public.” He fought against systematic racism, and also opposed the Vietnam War and militarism. He believed “poverty was a form of tyranny.” The indifference to humanity that led to dropping bombs in Vietnam was tied to the indifference to the poor in this country, whether they are poor blacks in the inner city, or Latinos in barrios or impoverished white in Appalachia. “There’s a connection between militarism on one hand and the indifference to the plight of our poor brothers and sisters on the other,” he said. That lesson has not been learned. Not when the U.S. has launched 512 drone strikes in the past year and dropped 26,171 bombs in the last year. West, who said he was breakdancing in 2008 when Barack Obama was elected president, has called the former president to task for not reining in the military industrial complex. The casualties – 750,000 in seven years – from those conflicts, mostly in majority Muslim nations, are what gave rise to “the gangsters and thugs” of…


BGSU Arts Calendar through Feb. 1

Jan. 18 – The Faculty Artist Series features Conor Nelson on flute. Nelson has appeared as a soloist with the Minnesota Orchestra, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and the Flint Symphony, among others. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 19 – The 59th annual Honor Band and Directors Clinic will feature the BGSU Wind Symphony in performance at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 19 – Poet Bruce Weigl will read from his work as part of the Creative Writing Program’s Visiting Writer Series. Weigl is author of “The Circle of Hanah” and more than a dozen books of poetry, including “The Abundance of Nothing”(2012) and “Song of Napalm”(1988), both of which were nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Jan. 20 – The Brown Bag Music Series will feature a musical theatre extravaganza by students and faculty from the College of Musical Arts. The program will begin at 11:45 a.m. in the Simpson Building, 1291 Conneaut Ave., Bowling Green. Free Jan. 21 – The 59th annual Honor Band and Directors Clinic will feature all Ohio Honor Bands. The concert will begin at 3:30 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 25 – The Faculty Artist Series presents pianist Robert Satterlee. He has appeared on the Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concerts in Chicago, San Francisco’s Old First Concert Series and the Schubert club in St. Paul, Minn., among others. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 26 – The Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series features graduate students Sam Adams and Dan Gualtieri. They will present their work at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Jan. 26 – BGSU’s Jazz Lab Band I will perform with guest artist and saxophonist Loren Stillman. Stillman has received praise in such publications as The New York Times, Downbeat magazine,…


Benefit to raise funds for Standing Rock Water Protectors

By ELENA ENRIQUEZ Join us on Saturday, Jan 21, from noon until closing for BG Standing With Standing Rock at Howard’s Club H to raise money to bring vital supplies to the Water Protectors who are risking their lives in sub zero temperature so that we all may share a healthy planet. The fight for clean water and life is far from over! Acoustic Stage Matt Ingles noon-12:30 April Freed 12:30-1 Jimmy Lambert 1-1:30 Sarah Connelly 1:30-2 Adamantium Experiment 2-2:30 Justin Payne 3-4 Main Stage Cadillac Jukebox 4-4:45 Getting Out Alive 5-5:45 2nd Mile Society 6-6:45 Moths In The Attic 7-7:45 Wood N Strings 8-8:45 Weak Little Ears 9-9:45 Awesome Job 10-10:45 Split Second 11-11:30 Daniken 12-12:45 Musical interludes between acts on the acoustic stage performed by; Matt Cordy, Barry Johnson ,Boo Lee Crosser, Bruce Lilly, and Zack Wilson. There will also be a silent auction, bake sale and food. $5 entry All proceeds from the event go directly into support for either firewood, or to supplies for the Medic Healer council. Let’s come together, the day after the inauguration, in solidarity as a positive, progressive community. Share passions and ideas, speak from your heart of how to transform this reality and how to grow as a community. We are creating a better, more inclusive and caring world for each other. Stand in support of a healthier planet and those who are peacefully protecting this dream. Mni Wiconi! Water is life! (Related story: http://bgindependentmedia.org/local-woman-joins-effort-to-stop-pipeline-at-standing-rock/)


Bobcat musicians selected for honor bands

From BOWLING GREEN BOBCAT  BANDS Seven Bowling Green Middle School band members  were selected to perform in the Ohio Music Education Association District One Middle School Honor Band 2017.  They include:  Culley Foos (bassoon), Sasha Zengel (Clarinet), Cyrus Koogan (Horn), Simon Metzger (Percussion), James Eddington (Trombone), Colin Crawford (Trumpet), and Nolan Miller (Trumpet).  Selected as first chair players for their sections were Culley Foos, Simon Metzger, James Eddington, and Colin Crawford.   These students prepared and recorded audition materials and were chosen among students from six counties in northwest Ohio.   Dr. Lisa Martin, currently a member of the BGSU music faculty, will be rehearsing and conducting the Middle School Honors Band.     The following students from the Bowling Green High School Bands were selected for the OMEA High School Honor Band 2017:  Saralynn George (flute), Megan Eddington (clarinet), Elana Cable (alto saxophone), Allan Landgraf (bari saxophone), Joseph Kalmar (horn), Frances Zengel (percussion), Joey Craig (percussion).  In addition, Saralynn George and Joey Craig were selected as first chair players.     These students will represent Bowling Green at the Ohio Music Educators Association Honors Festival on Sunday, February 12th at the Stranahan theater in Toledo.  The middle school concert will begin at 2:30pm and the high school concert will begin at7:00pm.  Both concerts are free and open to the public. Nine students from Bowling Green high school were selected to perform in the BGSU Honors Bands on January 18th, 19th, and 20th.  They include Natalie Avery (alto saxophone), Kerica Bucks (trombone), Elana Cable (alto saxophone), Joey Craig (percussion), Saralynn George (flute), Alex Munson (trumpet), Mary Shilling (flute), Skye Sloane (percussion), and Frances Zengel (percussion).  They will be performing with students throughout the state of Ohio.