Arts at Bowling Green State University

BGSU arts events through Oct. 17

Oct. 5 – The International Film Series presents “The Mermaid” (2016, China, 94 minutes, directed by Xingchi Zhou [Stephen Chow]), with an introduction by Elizabeth Niehaus, doctoral student in American culture studies. Breaking box office records to become China’s highest-grossing film to date, “The Mermaid” sees hit director Chow (“Shaolin Soccer,” “Kung Fu Hustle”) bring his zany, comic style to a modern fairytale with an environmentalist message. After their peaceful existence is destroyed by pollution and underwater sonar, a group of merfolk send an alluring mermaid to kill the young businessman responsible. Their revenge scheme hits a snag when mermaid and tycoon fall in love. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Oct. 5 – The Visiting Writer Series features poet Christopher Kempf, author of “Late in the Empire of Men,” which won the 2015 Levis Prize from Four Way Books. He is also the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship and a Wallace Stegner Fellowship from Stanford University. His poetry, essays and reviews have appeared in Gettysburg Review, Kenyon Review Online, The New Republic, PEN America and Ploughshares. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Oct. 5 – The BGSU Trumpet Guild will perform at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 11 – The Faculty Artist Series presents BGSU tuba/euphonium instructor David Saltzman. An active soloist and chamber musician, Saltzman was the winner of the 1996 Colonial Euphonium Tuba Quartet’s Tuba Solo Competition in Albany, New York. Since then, he has performed solo recitals at many regional and international festivals, and he has most recently been part of a consortium of tuba players commissioning a new concerto for tuba by Samuel Adler, currently slated to premiere in October 2018. Salzman’s performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 12 – The Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble will perform as part of a small ensemble with guest artist Matthew Murchison. Murchison is known as a varied performer, composer, arranger, educator, conductor and producer. He was a member of the River City Brass in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, from 2002-15, and was the principal solo euphonium for the last nine of those years. Since then, Murchison has performed…


BGSU Arts Events through Sept. 26

Sept. 6 – The Faculty Artist Series features violinist Penny Thompson Kruse at 8 p.m.in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 7 – Spotlight on the Arts focuses on creative writing with a talk by Dr. Lawrence Coates, chair of the Department of English and award-winning author of novels “The Master of Monterey,” “The Blossom Festival,” “The Garden of the World” and “Camp Olvido.” Coates will discuss “Temporary Landscapes: The Fiction of Place,” at 7:30 p.m. in the Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre at the Wolfe Center for the Arts. A reception will follow. Free Sept. 8 – Family Weekend kicks off with a family-friendly showcase featuring the College of Musical Arts, Department of Theatre and Film and the School of Art. The showcase begins at 7 p.m. in the Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre at the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Sept. 11 – The ARTalk series begins with “Strings, Folds and Rabbit Holes” by 1981 alumna Kristy Deetz, arts and visual design professor at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Her talk will begin at 6 p.m. in 204 Fine Arts Center. Free Sept. 12 – In conjunction with the exhibit “FABRICation,” Kristy Deetz, arts and visual design professor at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, will give a gallery talk on “The Curator’s Process.” The talk will begin at 5:30 p.m. in the Willard Wankelman Gallery at the Fine Arts Center. Free Sept. 12 – Tuesdays at the Gish presents “The Virgin Suicides” (1999, U.S., 97 minutes, directed by Sofia Coppola). This coming-of-age film, starring Kirsten Dunst and Josh Hartnett, features five sisters and the group of boys who become fascinated by their troubled lives. The film can be discussed in relation to current-day debates surrounding the series “13 Reasons Why.” Coppola, who later won the Best Screenplay Oscar for “Lost in Translation” (2003), has said that reading “The Virgin Suicides” novel is what prompted her to become a filmmaker. With an introduction by Kathleen Kollman, a doctoral student in American culture studies, the screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Sept. 13 – Faculty Artist Series presents Solungga Liu on the piano. Both a soloist and collaborator, Liu has performed music from the Lutoslawski “Piano Concerto” with Ossia, Steve Reich’s “The Desert Music” and “Tehillim” with Alarm Will Sound, and…


BGSU galleries hosting NOWOH art exhibit

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University Art Galleries is hosting the 10th Annual Northwest Ohio (NOWOH) Community Art Exhibition. NOWOH celebrates the talents of regional artists in a professional setting. The show opens Friday, July 14 at 7 p.m. with a gallery talk by the award juror Robert Thurmer, followed by the opening reception with light refreshments. Located at the BGSU Fine Arts Center, the exhibition is free and open to the public. Robert Thurmer has served as the director of the Cleveland State University Art Gallery since 1990. As a professor of art studio at CTU he is interested in the development of the individual from simple visual literacy to connoisseurship, and the understanding and appreciation of the elements and principles of art. Artists who display their work at the exhibition are eligible to win up to $1,500 in cash prizes and gift certificates. Among the awards are Best of Show, People’s Choice, the Kiwanis Young Artist Award and the Toledo Federation of Arts Societies Award. Artists of all skill levels, 16 years of age and older, are encouraged to enter. Online registration is open until July 1. Artists may enter in person on July 8. Further information regarding how to enter can be found at www.NowohArtShow.org. Artists from the following counties are eligible: Defiance, Erie, Fulton, Hancock, Henry, Lucas, Ottawa, Paulding, Sandusky, Seneca, Williams and Wood. For artists ages 16-18 the entry fees are $15, and for artists 19 and older entry fees are $30.  All entrants are able to submit up to three entries. Volunteers are needed to assist with the set up and take down of the event as well as gallery hosting during the exhibition. Artists who volunteer for the event will receive a registration discount. Contact Jacqueline Nathan at galleries@bgsu.edu for more information about volunteering. NOWOH hours are Thursday evenings, 6-8 p.m. and Friday through Sunday from 1-4 p.m. The exhibit will continue until July 29. Show sponsors include The Ohio Arts Council, BGSU Galleries, Toledo Federation of Arts Societies, Bowling Green Kiwanis, Drs. Phipps, Levin and Hebeka, Mr. Jeffery & Dr. Inge Klopping, the Art Depo, Kabob It, Encore Bridal, Grounds for Thought, The Cookie Jar, Coyote Beads and Jeweler, Painted Clovers, Gallery Salon and & Spa, Collingwood Arts Center, BG Convention and Visitors Bureau, The Village Idiot, Sunset Bistro, Broad…


Campus arts initiative at BGSU gives trustees a song & dance

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When William Mathis was discussing arts on campus as he sought to take over as dean of the College of Musical Arts there was a lot of talk about “creating a culture of the arts” at Bowling Green State University. Looking around, though, he came to realize that there is a culture of the arts. “It does permeate through the campus,” he said, and beyond. Mathis, who in addition to his duties as dean has been called on to coordinate the arts, presented an educational session to the BGSU Board of Trustees at their May meeting. He came with numbers – 1,500 students have arts majors on campus and incoming arts majors have an average ACT score of 26, “so they’re academically prepared.” Mathis noted there are 32 student organizations related to the arts. Last year more than 800 events were staged on campus. He didn’t leave it there. The arts programs are mostly in two colleges, the College of Musical Arts and the College of Arts and Science, the home for the School of Art, the Department of Theatre and Film, and the Creative Writing Program. (Dance is located in the School of Human Movement, Sport, and Leisure Studies.) He brought some of those numbers with him to do the talking and singing. The women’s chorus of Voices of BGSU, a gospel choir, was first up, led by Christopher Carter, the student who founded the choir in 2013. Carter is a Trustees Leadership Scholarship winner. The Voices, he said, have been, along with other campus groups, his home at BGSU. Carter, who has added a music minor to his studies, said: “I’m so grateful for the environment that’s allowed Voices to flourish.” He noted the diversity of the dozen singers who entertained the trustees. They are students not only of different races, but from different places, and studying a range of disciplines. “I’ve learned some of the greatest lessons from these people.” “Our goal is to create connections across campus,” Mathis said. Kim Young, a graphic design instructor, told the board about a video game project she and a team of students are developing in collaboration with the Toledo Opera, to introduce children to opera. The game uses…


Young conductor brings Mahler masterwork to BGSU stage

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In “Das Lied von der Erde (The Song of the Earth)” the composer Gustav Mahler tried to trick fate. Diagnosed with a health ailment, and emotionally reeling from the death of his eldest daughter, he didn’t want to write what would be his Ninth Symphony. For other composers the ninth symphony was their last. So he wrote “The Song of the Earth,” a six movement work of symphonic proportions, but didn’t call it a symphony, said Bowling Green State University musicologist Eftychia Papanikolaou. The piece also called for a large orchestra so was difficult to perform. But in the early 20th century a group of Viennese musicians including Arnold Schoenberg decided this work should be performed more often. So a reduction of the score for 14 musicians was created. Conductor Mercedes Diaz Garcia, a doctoral student at the College of Musical Arts, was drawn to the piece and decided that she wanted to present it to the Bowling Green community. So she recruited the musicians and the two vocal soloists. They’ve been rehearsing the difficult hour-long work for weeks and will present it Wednesday, April 19, at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall on campus. The project is an act of love for all concerned. Diaz Garcia can’t pay anyone, and the project is not part of her doctoral studies. “‘The Song of the Earth’ is not about the physical earth but about the inner world, it’s about the depth of the human soul. So it’s very deep, it’s very exhausting,” the conductor said. For all its challenges she found musicians who are up to the difficult task and willing to take it on. “I think they are very interested to play this because it’s Mahler. Mahler for orchestral musicians is a huge challenge. It’s so intense and so emotionally powerful.” And because of the small number of musicians, Diaz Garcia said. “Everyone’s a soloist so it’s very demanding and very exposed for everyone. That’s something musicians like.” It gives them more freedom to express their concept of the music than being in a section playing the same part as other musicians, she said. And as a conductor Diaz Garcia sees her role as working with allowing musicians to have…


Bill Mathis ready to move arts at BGSU into a new era as music dean

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News William Mathis takes charge as dean of the College of Musical Arts at a crucial time for arts education. Focusing on the traditional paths of performance and music education will not be enough for higher education music programs. “It’s a different arts and musical landscape then when I was coming up,” said Mathis, 56. While making sure students continue to achieve “technical and musical mastery,” the college needs to broaden its offerings. “We talk a lot about musical entrepreneurship, and I’ve been thinking about citizenship in the arts, arts advocacy and the connection to communities, and how the arts can impact the life of society in our local community,” he said. “The skills that requires are not part of a traditional music curriculum. How can we give that to them? I’ve been thinking about this a lot this year.” Music programs, and arts programs in general, need to prepare their student for a new entrepreneurial environment. “Twenty years from now the schools of music adapting to this will be around,” Mathis said. The fate of those sticking to the more traditional approach is less certain. Mathis wants BGSU to in the forefront of those that survive. Mathis stepped into the role of interim dean last July after Jeff Showell announced his retirement. After a national search, he was named dean in February. Mathis said he felt his administrative background made him a prime internal candidate for the permanent position. He’s served as chair of the Department of Performance Studies and as the college’s graduate coordinator. “I have a disposition that lends itself to this kind of work,” he said. “If I may, the kind of balancing, the level of ambiguity that kind of exists all the time… doesn’t scare me.” The key is “to be able to navigate through this with some kind of strategic vision and action because there’s so many external forces we don’t have control over. …. I have a higher tolerance for that where others may get frustrated. …It’s not work for everyone.” Mathis’ predilection for the administrative side may stem to his upbringing. Raised in Wichita, Kansas, his father was a band director who worked his way up to become associate dean of the…


BGSU arts events through April 28

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS April 13 – The International Film Series continues with the Swedish film “Force Majeure,” directed by Ruben Östlund. An award winner at the Cannes Film Festival, the Toronto Film Festival, and other internationally recognized venues, the film deftly explores the emotional dimensions of the legal term “force majeure,” an unexpected event (such as a hurricane) that releases both parties from the obligations of a contract. In this story, the ski vacation of a seemingly ideal family takes a sudden turn when an avalanche approaches them as they are having a pleasant lunch at the lodge. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 13 – Prout Readings conclude with B.F.A. student readings at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free April 13 – Bowling Green Opera Theater presents a variety of opera scenes. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free April 14 – The University Choral Society and Early Music Ensemble present Bach’s “St. John Passion.” The moving and sacred oratorio of Johann Sebastian Bach is a dramatic representation of the Passion as told in the Gospel of John for the Good Friday Vespers of 1724. Revel in the extravagant, expressive music of the season. The performance will begin at 7 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church, East Wooster St., Bowling Green. Free April 14 – The Toledo Museum of Art and BGSU’s College of Musical Arts present EAR | EYE Listening and Looking: Contemporary Music and Art. The performance and discussion series will feature BGSU doctoral candidates in music performing in response to the work in the Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic exhibit. It begins at 7 p.m. in the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St, Toledo. Free April 18 – Music at the Manor House features the Graduate String Quartet. The performance will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Manor House in Wildwood Metropark, 5100 W. Central Ave., in Toledo. Free   Through April 18–The M.F.A. I Thesis Exhibition will be on display in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman Galleries located in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are from 11 a.m….


St. John Passion in its element as Good Friday offering

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Liturgy and drama are one in Bach’s St. John Passion. The theatrical elements – a narrator, dialogue, and the evocative underscoring for small orchestra—are undeniable. Yet the message and the story almost demand the setting of a church. Yes, it is presented in a concert hall, but that’s akin to a staged reading of a play as opposed to a fully staged production. The St. John Passion was fully in its element on Palm Sunday afternoon in Hope Lutheran Church in Toledo. The Passion, one of two that have come down to us from Bach, the other being the monumental St. Matthew, was presented by musicians from Bowling Green State University. The performance brought together the Early Music Ensemble, directed by Arne Spohr, the University Choral Society directed by Mark Munson, who also conducted the work, organist Michael Gartz, and voice faculty taking on the principal roles and solos. Munson said he’s been waiting for Easter to fall late enough in the semester to be able to prepare the Passion for presentation during Holy Week. So on Good Friday, April 14, the St. John Passion will be presented at 7 p.m. in First United Methodist Church in Bowling Green as the community commemoration of the day. The Passion was first performed in 1724, revised over time, though the final version reverted to much the same as it was originally performed. As presented in Bach’s time, a sermon would be preached between parts one and two. Those in attendance Sunday were advised not to applaud between the two movements. Spohr read several verses of the gospel in Martin Luther’s German translation between the sections. The Passion develops on several fronts. The Evangelist, sung by Christopher Scholl, tells the story, with the direct quotations sung by other vocalists, including Lance Ashmore as Jesus. Interposed in the narration are reflections – chorales sung by the 40-voice choir and arias sung by four soloists alto Ellen Scholl, soprano Chelsea Cloeter, tenor Christopher Scholl, tenor, and bass/baritone Ashmore. Underneath the orchestra provides musical commentary and sets the scene. The opening passage with woodwinds and restless strings, musical establishes the theme that contrasts the degradation and horror of the passion with the glory of the…


BGSU arts events through April 18

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS April 7 – The Collegiate Chorale and University Women’s Chorus will perform at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets are $10 the day of the performance. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, by phone at 419-372-8171, or online at http://www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. April 7 – The elsewhere theater season concludes with “Dying City,” written by Christopher Shin and directed by Tanner Lias. The performance begins at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Additional performances will be at 8 p.m. on April 8 and 9. Free April 8 – The Dr. Marjorie Conrad Art Song Competition will take place in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Preliminaries will begin at noon, with finals following at 8 p.m. Free April 8 – An opening reception for the MFA I Thesis Exhibition will begin at 7 p.m. in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman Galleries in the Fine Arts Center. Free Through April 18 – The MFA I Thesis Exhibition will be on display in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman Galleries in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free April 9 – The Sunday Matinee Series continues with the 1925 film “The Lost World,” directed by Harry G. Hoyt. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was not only the creator of Sherlock Holmes, he happened to write imaginative first-rate adventures, including this tale which involves one Professor Challenge who discovers a jungle plateau where prehistoric beasts thrive — all masterfully animated by Willis O’Brien, who would bring to thrilling life King Kong. The screening will begin at 3 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 9 – The Douglas Wayland Student Chamber Competition winners will perform at 3 p.m. in the Great Gallery in the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St., Toledo. Free April 11 – Music at the Manor House features the Douglas Wayland Student Chamber Competition winners. A performance…


Arts earn applause & money at Bravo! BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The creativity at Bravo! BGSU Saturday night couldn’t be contained. It spilled out into the hallways, where artists mingled with guests, and the work of the arts happened up close. This was a show and a party all in one, and everyone was a member of the cast. Bravo! BGSU was started three years ago as a way to raise money for arts scholarships. Lisa Mattiace, the president’s chief of staff, said that 285 tickets were sold, 50 more than last year. The event raised an estimated $85,000 for scholarships, and about $15,000 more. Mattiace said she was pleased to see so many new faces. Dr. Mary Ellen Mazey said she hopes the event continues to grow, and becomes recognized as the premier arts event in the area. On Saturday night, performers showed the investment in the arts was well-placed. As guests arrived at the Wolfe Center, they were greeted by the drumming of the Kazenodaichi Taiko ensemble. Inside a tableau of the arts was set up on half the lobby’s grand stairway. The mannequins representing the different disciplines were the only things not moving. Guests milled around tables laden with savory food, as waiters moved about offering tiny cupcakes and truffles. The event got under way with a blast of horns and a swirl of color as the Afro-Caribbean ensemble marched in. From there guests dispersed throughout the center where they found attractions behind every door and around every corner. Benji Katz was performing his poetry accompanying himself on guitar. Baylee Sheets was doing theatrical makeup. Paul Verdell was painting a hip-hop inspired portrait with oils. Katelyn Turner stood ready to talk about the quartet of art dresses she had created. Also in the lobby Zach Nyce held forth on the piano, displaying his jazzy side. Sometimes singers would gather around to share an impromptu song. Joel O’Dorisio, art instructor, interacted by live video stream, with artisans working in the glassworks across the way in the School of Art. Tonight they were busy popping corn in a large goblet fresh from the furnace and making grilled cheeses to share with the guests. The Department of Theatre and Film gave a peak of coming attractions – the film “Well-Born”…


BGSU Arts Events through April 12

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS March 31 – Jazz Week continues with a trombone performance from Jazz Lab Band I with Grammy-nominated guest artist Alan Ferber. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, by phone at 419-372-8171, or online at www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets are $10 the day of the performance. April 1 – Bravo! BGSU celebrates the very best of the arts. Experience a magical evening of vocal, instrumental and theatrical performances, plus exhibitions and demonstrations by student and faculty artists in glass, ceramics, metals and digital arts. Enjoy a festive atmosphere and an array of appetizers and tasty treats. The celebration will begin at 7 p.m. in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. To purchase tickets to the event, contact Lisa Mattiace in the President’s Office at 419-372-6780 or by email at lmattia@bgsu.edu April 1 – Students from BGSU’s College of Musical Arts will be featured in an afternoon chamber music concert at 1 p.m. at the Way Public Library, 101 E. Indiana Ave., Perrysburg. Hosted by Pro Musica, friends of music at the college, the program will feature students who have received travel grants from the organization. The concert is free and open to the public. April 2 – The Gish Sunday Matinee series kicks off with the 1945 film “And Then There Were None,” directed by René Clair. Agatha Christie’s celebrated who-done-it “Ten Little Indians,” under the deft guidance of French director Clair, becomes a delightful, sly, topnotch film noir. The skillful adaptation boasts a strong cast of Hollywood’s most memorable character actors, with a score by esteemed Italian composer Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco. The program will also include a Technicolor cartoon. The screening begins at 3 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 2 – The A Cappella Choir and University Men’s Chorus will perform at 3 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, by phone at 419-372-8171, or online at www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. Advance tickets are $3 for students…


Musical serpent to be celebrated at BGSU

There’s a serpent in the College of Musical Arts at Bowling Green State University. Not of the reptilian variety, but rather the musical type. The college will host a residency on the snakelike historical horn featuring Douglas Yeo, the leading scholar on the instrument. The event takes place April 4-6 at Moore Musical Arts Center and includes a free public concert, a seminar and a lesson on playing the serpent, plus master classes with college students and faculty members on the serpent and the trombone. The serpent master class, led by faculty member David Saltzman, will take place from 9:30-10:20 a.m. April 5 in 2002 Moore Musical Arts Center and is open to the public. The seminar will be held from 2-3:15 p.m. April 6 in 2117 Moore. “The Ruth P. Varney Serpent: A Conversation and Concert Led by Douglas Yeo” will begin at 8 p.m. that evening in Bryan Recital Hall in the Moore Center, with a reception following in the Kennedy Green Room. The program includes marches written by Christopher Eley, Samuel Wesley and Josef Haydn for the Duke of York, the Prince of Wales and the Derbyshire Cavalry Regiment, plus a divertimento in four movements attributed to Haydn. Yeo’s performance will be accompanied by students and faculty from the College of Musical Arts. The idea for the BGSU serpent conference came about when the college received the donation of a serpent from Dr. Glenn Varney, professor emeritus of marketing. The instrument had belonged to his late wife, Ruth, whose grandparents had purchased it for her mother. “It is an English military serpent with four keys by an anonymous maker, likely constructed in the mid to late 1830s in England,” Varney wrote in the concert program. “This serpent was purchased at an antique store in London, England, in the early 1900s.” Ruth Varney stored it in their living room next to the piano until its historical value was discovered in the 2013 after the Varneys contacted expert Craig Kridel of the University of South Carolina. Upon receiving the donation of the serpent and its original ivory mouthpiece, the college sent it to Yeo, who kept it in his home in Arizona for several months and played it regularly. “In the course of my work with the serpent, I prepared a fingering chart, such…


The arts are ready for their close up at Bravo! BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News With Bravo! BGSU entering its third year it has not settled into a pattern, and that’s by design. The arts gala was created by President Mary Ellen Mazey to raise money for scholarships for Bowling Green State University students in the arts. The night showcases the creativity from all the arts on campus, with a selection of sweet and savory munchies. The celebration will begin at 7 p.m.in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. To purchase tickets, call 419-372-6780 or email lmattia@bgsu.edu. For more information, visit bgsu.edu/bravo. Because of sponsorships, including by presenting sponsor PNC, all the ticket money will go toward scholarships. Last year, more than $70,000 was raised. Both sponsorships and ticket sales are up, said newly named Dean of the College of Musical Arts William Mathis. In a statement, Mazey said: “Bravo! BGSU is a wonderful evening that allows us to showcase the talents of our students, faculty and alumni in the arts.” With the interim dropped from his title, Mathis and Dean of Arts and Sciences Raymond Craig has been serving as “artistic directors” of Bravo, Mathis said. “We’ve been telling our patrons we wanted to do something a little different every year, and bring on new elements” Mathis said. The biggest change will be a short, culminating concert at the end of the evening. The feeling was the gala needed a finale. A new nine-foot Steinway grand piano will be dedicated, and a scene from last semester’s musical “The Drowsy Chaperone” will be presented. Also showcased will be recent BGSU graduate Jenny Cresswell who will perform in a vocal duo with her husband, Brad Cresswell, now program director at WGTE-FM. Both are veteran operatic performers. Another husband-wife musical duo, Revamped with Mark Minnich and Sally Williams Minnich will perform throughout the evening. Both violinists are graduates of the College of Musical Arts. The duo is a holdover from the previous Bravo events. Also performing at several times will be Greek accordion virtuoso Panagiotis Andreoglou, who is a Fulbright Fellow at BGSU this semester. A New Orleans style band will traverse the halls announcing the various acts. All the arts on campus are getting in the act. Even creative writers who normally work in solitude…


BGSU Jazz Week guest, trombonist Alan Ferber, has reached out to create a successful career

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News For Grammy-nominated composer, arranger and trombonist Alan Ferber, his trip to Bowling Green is not a one-way street. He’ll work with students, and share with them the knowledge developed over a couple decades as a professional musician as they work to master his big band charts. That will give them “an intense experience of playing music with the guy who wrote it. I know it was like that with me when I was in college.” He’ll also get to hear some of his music written for a nine-piece group performed by local professionals. Hearing this nonet music played by a different set of musicians, most of whom he hasn’t met before, is fun, he said. He does know David Bixler, head of the Jazz Studies program at BGSU, who will play alto sax in the nonet. He and Bixler played in Toshiko Akiyoshi’s Jazz Orchestra together. It was Bixler who arranged Ferber’s visit to campus. Ferber is the guest artist for Jazz Week at the Bowling Green State University campus. He’ll perform a free nonet concert with the faculty and guests on Wednesday at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, and Friday with the Jazz Lab Band I at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall. Tickets are $7 and $3 for students in advance and all tickets are $10 the day of the show. Call 419-372-8171 or visit www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. See http://bgindependentmedia.org/bgsu-arts-events-through-april-4/ for a schedule of Jazz Week events. Ferber said in dealing with students, his first job is putting them at ease. There can be certain misconceptions about how he’ll react. At a previous residency at another school one student asked: “Will he be mean?” “The first thing I try to impart on them is we’re all living breathing humans that all have universal needs. We’re just real people,” he said. “Then I try to give them the experience of a person that’s been doing this a long time as a professional in New York City. It gives them a glimpse of something they may want to do.” Not that the scene they step onto is the same as what Ferber encountered 20 years ago when he arrived in New York. “It’s a different world now then when I started….


BGSU arts events through April 4

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS   Through March 31 – The BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition will be on display in the Bryan and Wankelman Galleries, located in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m.Sundays. Free March 24 – Bowling Green Opera Theater features Kurt Weill’s “Street Scene.” The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Advance tickets are $5 for students and children and $15 for adults. All tickets are $20 the day of the performance. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, by calling 419-372-8171 or online at www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. An additional performance will be at 3 p.m. on March 26. March 24 – EAR | EYE Listening and Looking: Contemporary Music and Art explores the relationship of contemporary music and art through music performances in response to specific works of art and discussion. It is a partnership between the doctoral program at BGSU’s College of Musical Arts and the Toledo Museum of Art. The event begins at 7 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St. Free March 28 – Tuesdays at the Gish continues with the 1991 film “Thelma and Louise,” directed by Ridley Scott. Based on the award-winning screenplay by Callie Khouri, the film draws us into the remarkable but troubling adventures of Thelma (Geena Davis) and Louise (Susan Sarandon) that arise from their desire to take a few days off from their oppressive lives as women in domestic/economic relationships. Their misadventures lead to encounters with a duplicitous hitchhiker (Brad Pitt) and a sympathetic policeman (Harvey Keitel). The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free March 28 – Jazz Week begins with the Vocal Jazz Ensemble in performance at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 28 – Music at the Manor House features viola students of Matthew McBride- Daline. The recital will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Manor House, located at Wildwood Metropark, 5100 W. Central Ave., Toledo. Free March 29 – In celebration of Jazz Week, the Faculty Artist…