Articles by David Dupont

Earth Week opens with Creation Care Celebration

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Creation Care Celebration, which marked the beginning of Earth Week activities in Bowling Green, focused on the possibilities. Honored by the Black Swamp Green Team, the event’s sponsors, were those who were already making a difference locally, and statewide. The keynote speaker spoke about what churches could do to preserve the environment. And a series of workshops were offered on household options for taking action. Stumbling blocks were mentioned – the state’s renewable energy standards are on hold. But the two state legislators in attendance State Senator Randy Gardner and State Representative Tim Brown, both Republicans said they were in favor of lifting the hold on them and letting them take effect. The keynote speaker Greg Hitzhusen of Ohio State University’s School of Environment & Natural Resources, spoke of a pastor in Idaho who took the initiative to put saving the environment at the center of his church’s mission. He discovered, Hitzhusen said, less resistance than he expected. Now 10 years later he’s experiencing fierce backlash to his efforts. “How do we overcome these obstacles?” Hitzhusen wondered. The speaker, who is involved in the Interfaith Light and Power movement, focused his talk on what works. “Build on your strengths,” he said. That means finding what expertise is within the congregation that can spearhead efforts. The United Church of Christ in Sylvania used the expertise of Al Compaan, a leading researcher in photovoltaics, to initiate a solar project. “Do what makes sense for your…


BGSU College of Business gets bump in Bloomberg rankings

From BGSU Bloomberg Businessweek released rankings of undergraduate business programs including the College of Business Administration at Bowling Green State University. After surveying nearly 30,000 students and recruiters from approximately 600 companies, Bloomberg Businessweek ranked the top 114 business programs out of nearly 1,600 in the country. BGSU ranked number 71, up from 90 in the previous ranking, placing it among the top 5 percent of programs in the nation and the top 2 percent in the world. “The rankings show that the College of Business at BGSU continues Going Beyond Business As Usual,” said Ray Braun, Dean of the College of Business. “We are pleased that our unique program, delivered by outstanding faculty and staff, is being recognized by Bloomberg Businessweek as one of the best in the world.”


BGSU’s “Noises Off” brings on roars of laughter

By DAVID DUPONT By BG Independent News The actress playing the housekeeper in “Nothing On” is struggling during the dress rehearsal. The play is about to open and she’s still trying to learn her lines. Some of what comes out of her mouth, allows the director, does have a ring of familiarity. The actress says, her brain is like a slot machine—she’s not sure what’s going to pop up, two oranges, a lemon or even bananas. “Nothing On” is a play within the play “Noises Off,” and by the time we get out final shout out to sardines, it’s all bananas. The classic theatrical farce “Noises Off`” opens tonight at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre in the Bowling Green State University’s Wolfe Center for the Arts. It continues Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. Advance tickets are $15 and $5 for students. All tickets are $20 the day of the performance. Visit bgsu.edu/arts or call the box office at 419-372-8171. Directed by Geoff Stephenson, “Noises Off” is a well-oiled piece of comic chaos. The show is full of fainting, pratfalls, dropping trousers, stuck doors, and multiple servings of sardines that appear and disappear as if they had a will of their own. The play opens during the dress rehearsal of a touring company’s production of “Nothing On,” a British bedroom farce. Dotty Ortley (Ashli York) who plays the dithering maid is, well, dithering, speaking her lines and musing aloud on what she…


Melissa Miller named Master Teacher at BGSU

From BGSU Office of Marketing & Communications Dr. Melissa Miller, named the 2016 Master Teacher at Bowling Green State University, believes the most important aspect of teaching is sharing a contagious enthusiasm for learning. “While brilliant scholars can bore students to proverbial tears, brilliant teachers convey a contagious enthusiasm for learning that is literally infectious,” Miller wrote. “Enthusiasm drives all of the other factors we tend to bandy about when ticking off what makes a great teacher: passion, dedication, charisma, intellect.” Miller, associate professor in the Department of Political Science, received the prestigious Master Teacher Award at the Faculty Excellence Awards Ceremony and Reception April 14. This is the highest teaching award presented to faculty and the only student-driven and student-selected award at BGSU. It comes with a $1,000 check presented by the Student Alumni Connection. In addition to enthusiasm, Miller brings several qualities to the classroom that resonate with students. “Having an enthusiastic, student-centered approach to every classroom session is the key to student learning, as well as the promotion of student growth as citizens and leaders in the BGSU and broader communities,” Miller wrote. “My teaching philosophy is driven by a desire to produce not just good students, but good citizens able to confront and address challenges in their lives, work and communities. Classroom experiences that build habits – of problem-solving, teamwork, resourcefulness and ingenuity – will serve students far into the future, as lifelong Falcons.” This includes the incorporation of research in the classroom. Miller believes there…


River House Arts takes up residence in historic Secor building

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News River House Arts, an art gallery that has enlivened the area art scene for six years, has now taken up residence on the left bank … of the Maumee River in the Glass City. Paula Baldoni who owns the business with her husband, William Jordan, said that move from the house on the river in Perrysburg to the sprawling new space in the Secor Building at 425 Jefferson Ave. has taken more time than anticipated. But even as Jordan works on the floors in the 9th floor office space, the gallery is ready to open its newest show, “Immigrants, Outcasts, and Other Heroes,” oil paintings and drawings by Cuban artist Augusto Bordelois. The show of more than two dozen works opens with a reception Thursday from 6 to 9 p.m. The show continues through June 4. For details visit: http://www.river-house-arts.com/#!immigrants-outcasts-and-other-heroes/cbtc The exhibit is well in keeping with what River House Art has been about all along. Its exhibits have featured forgotten American masters such as Clay Walker featured in the gallery’s first show in November, 2009; international artists such as Mexican painter Veronica Leiton, creator of surreal abstract cityscapes; important contemporary Americans such as Swinomish and Tulalip photographer Matika Wilbur, who is using fine art photography to produce powerful and positive images of contemporary indigenous people; and local artists both young, jeweler Amy Beeler, and more established, photographer and digital artist Lou Krueger. Bordelois, Baldoni said, has been living in Cleveland since 1999, but…


BGSU names new VP for student affairs

Bowling Green State University has tapped an administrator from Ball State as its new vice president for student affairs and vice provost. Dr. Thomas Gibson, associate vice president for student affairs at Ball State University, will join Bowling Green State University on July 1. According to a letter to the university from President Mary Ellen Mazey: “His vision for student affairs aligns well with what we strive for at BGSU, that is, a campus environment where classroom and co-curricular activities work together to support student success. As you may have gathered from the title change for this position, the vice president for student affairs and vice provost will have additional interaction with the academic side of the University to further enhance the synergetic relationship between the two.” Gibson has worked for 19 years in higher education including at York and Queens colleges CUNY and the University of Connecticut previous to his job at Ball State University. Those experiences, Mazey’s letter says “provided him with a ground-up view of student affairs. His experience includes serving as an advocate for students along with strategic planning, program development, diversity and inclusion efforts, retention and degree-completion initiatives and budget, resource and facilities management.” Jill Carr, a 39-year employee at BGSU, held the position for four years until her retirement last June. Dr. Sidney Childs served as interim vice president for student affairs during the transition. “He has enabled the division to continue moving forward, and I value his service,” Mazey’s letter said.


Rebecca Skinner Green receives BGSU distinguished faculty service award

By BGSU Office of Marketing & Communications In her 20 years with BGSU, Dr. Rebecca Skinner Green, an associate professor of art history, has enhanced the University in myriad ways, from her leadership on the details of merit, tenure and promotion document revisions to the global, bringing scholars and artists from around the world to broaden the community’s horizons. Skinner Green was recognized with the Faculty Senate Distinguished Service Award at the annual Faculty Excellence Awards held April 14. The award is given in recognition of outstanding, continuous service and to highlight the importance of dedicated faculty to the well-being of the University. Skinner Green received a $1,000 cash prize and a reserved parking spot for a year — a useful benefit for someone so involved not only with her own department but with numerous other areas across campus. In her academic “home,” she served multiple times as chair of the art history division in the School of Art, from 2001-06, 2008-11 and again in fall of 2015. “During all of my interactions as an art history faculty member working with Dr. Skinner Green as the chair, she has repeatedly proven herself to be an outstanding leader with exceptional good humor and collegiality throughout all of the ups and downs that one can expect to encounter in such a role,” Dr. Andrew Hershberger said. “Indeed, I regard Dr. Skinner Green as an excellent model for all faculty administrators in terms of how to run a division efficiently, effectively, and also…


Wood County Library sets limits on unattended children

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The library is a great place for kids, a safe space for kids, but it’s not a day care center and the staff members are not babysitters. The Wood County District Public Library approved a policy Tuesday that clarifies just how employees will deal with unattended children. The policy, said Library Director Michael Penrod, was drawn based on guidelines from Child Protective Services. The library staff needs to know, he said, what to do if they have a 6-year-old running around and the parent is two miles away at home. Penrod said that in discussions with parents, staff has been told that there are no guidelines. Now there are. From birth to age 7, the parent or guardian, must be “in the immediate vicinity.” There was some discussion whether that should be more precisely defined, but Penrod said short of getting measuring tape out, that may prove to be too restrictive. “You’ve got to be able to see them,” Board president Brian Paskvan said For children 8 or 9, Penrod said, the parent needs to be in the building. Those 10, 11 and 12 years old can use it on their own. Here the issue becomes transportation. “If a child is not able to leave the library without an adult, they should not be in the library without an adult,” Penrod said. Also, if a child needs to wait for a ride at closing time, the staff will call the police to provide transportation…


A peek in at our parks by Frances Brent

The 1960 Bowling Green High School Class Living Memorial nestles behind the Sculpture Garden near the Wintergarden entrance of the Simpson Garden. Ice King Daffodils bloom now in early spring. Later the Crusader Hawthorne trees blaze forth followed by the delicate Peach Drift roses of mid-summer. The ground cover provides a subtle white bloom in fall and mums complete the blooming season.


Lawrence Coates’ historical fiction earns top BGSU research award

By BGSU Office of Marketing & Communications Reading Dr. Lawrence Coates’ fiction is to be immersed in another era, from the California of the first settlers to its vineyards during Prohibition and even the first dot-com bust of the 1990s. Coates achieves this resonance in part through assiduous research, making sure that all the subtle details render the sights, sounds, landscape and tenor of the times against which his stories are set. His achievements were recognized with the 2016 Olscamp Research Award, presented to him at the annual Faculty Excellence Awards on April 14. Given annually by the Office of Sponsored Programs and Research to a faculty member for outstanding scholarly or creative accomplishments during the previous three years, the award includes a $2,000 cash prize and a reserved parking spot for a year. Coates, a professor and chair of the English department, has received recognition for his work almost from the beginning. His first novel, “The Blossom Festival,” was chosen by Barnes and Noble for its 1999 Discover Great New Writers program, and he has continued to win kudos and awards ever since on both the regional and national scales. He has been the recipient of the Western States Book Award in fiction and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in fiction. “For the last 20 years, I have written fiction set in California that explores and interrogates the interrelationship of space and human desire,” he said. The last three years have been especially prolific for him. He…


BGSU music, art faculty join forces for Puerto Rican project

By BGSU Office of Marketing & Communications College of Musical Arts faculty members John Sampen, Susan Nelson, Nermis Mieses, Kevin Schempf, Conor Nelson and Marilyn Shrude, along with School of Art faculty member Lynn Whitney have been awarded a Glanz Family Research Award for Interdisciplinary Faculty Innovation and Collaboration. Their proposal, Tierkreis, is a multidisciplinary project leading to educational workshops and concert presentations in Puerto Rico and northwest Ohio. This artistic collaboration involves the College of Musical Arts and School of Art faculty in the preparation and presentation of “Tierkreis.” Composed by the late German composer Karlheinz Stockhausen, this major work is comprised of flexible movements based on the signs of the zodiac. The composer has referred to these as “twelve human characters.” The elastic framework of the composition is ideal for interdisciplinary exploration. Additionally, the zodiac “characters” offer a symbolic relationship with the cycle of life, providing a vehicle for discussion and communication with both students and general audiences. Composition professor, Marilyn Shrude, will prepare a version of “Tierkreis” for woodwind faculty members, and Lynn Whitney will develop an accompanying photo display. Next fall, the faculty will travel to Puerto Rico to present performances and workshops of the collaboration at the Conservatorio de Musica de Puerto Rico. In-school residencies and a performance at the Wolfe Center for the Performing Arts are also being scheduled.


BG high’s “Footloose” is about more than fancy footwork

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News This is not just some footloose and fancy free musical. The stage musical version of “Footloose,” a story told twice on the big screen, touches on some serious issues, said Jo Beth Gonzalez, who directs the theater program at Bowling Green High School. “There’s domestic violence,” she said, “loss of family, and death. … I actually think the stage play is richer.” And, of course, lots of dancing. It is, after all, called “Footloose.” “It’s a big dance show,” Gonzalez said.                     The musical will be on stage Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. in the Bowling Green Performing Arts Center. Tickets are available at the center’s box office Monday through Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dancing is one of the reasons senior Logan Brown wanted to audition for the lead. He loves to dance and used to perform with his sister Lauren. Brown was excited that he would work with Bob Marzola, who is serving as choreographer. Brown has been in all the musicals during his high school career, he said.  He’s said he was “super excited” to be taking on the role of Ren Mac Cormack, a teenager from the east who ends up in a southern town where dancing has been banned. He’s an outsider “with daddy issues,” Brown said. He’s more than willing to push back against rules “that don’t make any sense.”…


Singers come from near & far to honor Jim Brown

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Those who knew Jim Brown will go the distance to honor his memory. Linda Gullufsen, who will direct the singers at a memorial for Brown Saturday at 11 a.m. at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church in Bowling Green, now lives in Tennessee. Others, such as Brandy Tell Mann who is now living in Youngstown, are traveling from far corners of the state. Others are coming from the East and West coasts and places in between. Gullufsen said that one singer arrived at the first rehearsal with an apology. She’d flown in from New York, but she was not able to come to the memorial service. Was it all right if she participated in the rehearsal? She wanted to do at least that to pay tribute to her former choral director. “That speaks volumes about the man being honored,” Gullufsen said. “He was revered enough in his life that they would make any sacrifice they could to be part of this choir,” she said.  And everyone comes with a story. Of course, many others are coming from Bowling Green where Brown was the high school choral director from 1966 to 2004 and an active member on the arts scene.“He was Mr. Music in this community,” said Ed O’Donnell who coordinated the music for the memorial service. Last Friday a handful of singers got together for more rehearsal on the music that will be sung. The four pieces, three sung by the full choir, were all chosen…


State kicks in funds for BGSU construction, curling club

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The state’s capital budget includes $25,440,325 for projects in Wood County. More than $17 million is earmarked for work at Bowling Green State University. The budget includes $7,164,200 for campus-wide electrical upgrades and $8,418,500 for campus wide heating ventilation and air conditioning upgrades. BGSU is in the process of renovating two of its oldest buildings, University Hall and Moseley Hall. Another $500,000 is going toward the completion of the renovation and extension of South Hall into a new School of Media and Communications and the integration of WBGU-TV into the program. The state is also contributing $1 million to the university’s development of forensic science programs. Those programs were jumpstarted by the construction of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation lab on campus in 2014. Another $80,000 is going to the Bowling Green Curling Club toward its new facility on Ohio 25 just north of Bowling Green. State Rep. Tim Brown said that the money stems from the fact that changes at the university’s ice arena to improve hockey facilities there eliminated designated curling ice. That means the curling club has been less able to compete on the national and international level. He said the hope is with the new facility that the club may be able to host a national or international tournament for its upcoming 50th anniversary. Brown said this was less than requested, but that’s the case for most of the awards. Owens Community College received about $7.2 million for various projects….


Mills Jewelry closing shop after 69 years

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Saturday afternoon was like many others at Mills Jewelry on 192 S. Main St., Bowling Green. Someone stopped in to pick up earrings from her grandmother that had the posts reattached. Another woman picked up a necklace that had been repaired and was looking at rings. Another customer needed a battery for an older watch. And David Mills and his sister Diane Mills Haslinger were there to help them just as members of the Mills family have been for the past 69 years. On May 7, though, Mills and Haslinger will close up shop. A chapter of Bowling Green retail history will close. While the siblings agree they’re ready to take a break from the day-to-day grind of running the shop every day except Sundays and holidays. Haslinger said she’s looking forward to traveling and visiting grandchildren. Still she admits some mixed feelings. She raised her children here, she said. “It’s bittersweet.” As of Monday, the store will offer customers a last chance at the merchandise at sale prices for up to 50 percent off. The Mills family got into the jewelry business before World War II. Glee Mills learned watch repair working at Norm Crosby Jewelry in downtown Bowling Green in a storefront now occupied by the Busy Thimble. Glee Mills went off to serve in the Navy during the war and when he returned to Bowling Green he got back into watch repairs, working out of his home. When Norm Crosby decided…