Articles by David Dupont

Don Scherer’s “Cooperative Wisdom” wins Nautilus Award

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS A book co-authored by Dr. Donald Scherer, professor emeritus of philosophy, and BGSU alumna Carolyn Jabs, a journalist and author, is the recipient of a gold Nautilus Award. “Cooperative Wisdom: Bringing People Together When Things Fall Apart” won recognition for illuminating an innovative and highly effective approach to conflict resolution. “We started working on the book in 2008, long before the recent election,” Scherer said. “Today, we find that people are deeply tired of endless conflict. There’s a real hunger for the benefits that come only from cooperation.” Scherer, who specialized in environmental ethics during his teaching career, spent a lifetime studying social systems to understand what makes them sustainable. “Cooperative Wisdom” distills his research, describing five principles that promote the kind of cooperation that undergirds thriving human communities. “The book is rooted in rigorous ethical philosophy,” Scherer said, “but the principles are relevant for families, schools, workplaces, nonprofit organizations and even governments.” Scherer and Jabs wrote the book as a conversation, a time-honored way of presenting philosophical ideas. Using living examples from history, current events, family life and Scripture, the book guides readers through 15 practices that will help them master this new way of responding to conflict. Jabs writes the award-winning column “Growing Up Online” and has published hundreds of articles on families, ethics, environmental issues and the internet. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Newsweek, Working Mother and Family PC, among many others. She is also the author of “The Heirloom Gardener.” The Nautilus Book Awards recognize books that transcend barriers of culture, gender, race and class. Now in their 19th year, Nautilus awards go to books that make exceptional literary contributions to conscious living and green values, high-level wellness, positive social change, and spiritual growth. In keeping with the Nautilus slogan, “Better books for a better world,” all the books selected as winners are “potent seeds for the growth, coherence, and healing of our world.” Previous winners of the award include Dr. Deepak Chopra, Barbara Kingsolver, Louise Erdrich, Thich Nhat Hanh, Eckhart Tolle, the Dalai Lama, Dr. Andrew Weil, Desmond Tutu and Naomi Wolf. See a complete list of this year’s winners. “Cooperative Wisdom” is available at local bookstores including Grounds For Thought and Barnes and Noble. It can also be purchased at Amazon.com. Learn more about the book.



BGSU researchers find virus may have been accomplice in Toledo water crisis

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS In August 2014, toxins from algal blooms in Lake Erie shut down the city of Toledo, Ohio’s water supply, leaving half a million residents without potable water for more than two days. A new study co-authored by Bowling Green State University researchers shows that a virus may have been involved in the crisis and suggests methods for more stringent monitoring of water supplies. Michael McKay, Ryan Professor of Biology, and George Bullerjahn, Professor of Research Excellence, both at BGSU, worked with a team of 25 researchers to examine the physiological traits of Microcystis, the cyanobacterial organism responsible for scum-like algal blooms in Lake Erie. They found that it was consistent with algal blooms from 2012 and 2013 except for one thing – the Microcystis cells had a viral infection. Typically, toxins from algal blooms are trapped within the cell until the cell dies. But virus infections can cause cells to break open, leaking the toxin into the water and subsequently into water facility intake pipes and treatment centers. The viruses analyzed in this study infect only bacteria and do not infect humans. “The study changes the way we think about how the toxin moves around aquatic systems and gets into water supplies,” said Steven Wilhelm, Mossman Professor of Microbiology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, who led the study. “It may help us understand how these organisms persist in nature.” The study was published recently in the journal Environmental Science and Technology. Co-authors included Wilhelm and his team from the University of Tennessee; Tim Davis of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory; and Gregory Dick of the University of Michigan. The scientists documented the viral infection by sequencing RNA from the Toledo water samples. They also used computer mathematical models to simulate how the algal blooms moved through water: satellite images were used to pinpoint where the blooms were on certain days and computer models filled gaps in between. McKay recalls coordinating with NOAA’s Davis and UT’s Wilhelm to obtain samples for RNA sequencing within hours of the “Do not drink” advisory being announced on Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014. “Recognizing that this group of scientists had the knowledge and tools to get to the bottom of this, Steve [Wilhelm] was pressing us to get samples while the bloom was still encroaching on the water intake” McKay said. “The…


Programs on using iPad & books for WWI soldiers on tap at library

Submitted by WOOD COUNTY DISTRICT LIBRARY Each Monday in June (6/ 5, 6/12, 6/19, and 6/26) the Wood County District Public Library (Bowling Green) offers iPad for Beginners classes in its 2nd Floor Meeting Room. Class sessions start at 11 am, and will cover new material each week. The workshops will provide an easy-going, fun environment in which to explore the basic functions of your iPad. Areas covered include: the hardware, settings, navigation, app basics. Registration required. To register, call 419-352-5050. Join us Tuesday, June 6 at 7 pm, for “Books Wanted for Our Men Over There.” Learn how the Library War Service, established in 1917 by the American Library Association, used money from private donations to create camp libraries and distribute over 7 million books and magazines to U.S. soldiers serving in World War I. WCDPL’s Michele Raine shares the history of this service and insights into the impact access to books had on those serving in the war. 2nd Floor Meeting Room. All programs are free and open to all. For more information, contact the library at 419-352-5104,


Sharma earns doctorate in osteopathic medicine

Submitted by Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine Saurabh Sharma of Bowling Green was among the students who received a doctor of osteopathic medicine (D.O.) degree from Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine at the college’s May 6 commencement exercises. In 2008 Dr. Sharma earned a B.S. and M.S. in biology from Bowling Green State University, and is a 2000 graduate of Don Bosco School in Siliguri, India. After graduation, Dr. Sharma will begin a residency in internal medicine in Columbus. The 2017 graduating class was the 38th to graduate from the Heritage College, which was created by the Ohio Legislature in 1975, and is the only institution in the state accredited to educate osteopathic physicians.


Sense of community blossoms in Common Good’s garden

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Common Good’s community garden at Peace Lutheran Church grows the usual beans, tomatoes, lettuce and eggplants. It also grows a sense of community. The produce that grows in the 3,500-square-foot plot can nourish a body. It can also nourish a sense of being connected to the earth. A core group of 15 people cultivate the plot so what grows there can be shared with everyone. The community garden was inspired by a cultural immersion trip to Mexico in 2008, said Megan Sunderland, director of the Common Good, a community and spiritual development center. The students came back stuffed with food for thought about globalization, access to land for gardens, and access to nutritious food. They also were committed to doing more than thinking about the issue. They were ready to get their hands dirty planting the seeds of action locally. The idea for the community garden grew from that. Sutherland said they approached Pastor Deb Conklin of Peace Lutheran about using some of the space on the church’s property between Pearl and West Wooster streets. The church was interested in the collaboration, providing the garden space, a tools and a place to store them, and access to the church. All this is in keeping with the creation care that’s a central tenet of the church’s mission. The core of about 15 people who regularly show up for planting, weeding and harvesting have a variety of motivations. Some are interested in sustainable agriculture, others in providing space so anyone can garden, and others providing quality food to the community. On Memorial Day Weekend, the garden is taking shape. The plants that the group got from Toledo Grows, a project of the Toledo Botanical Garden, are in place, and now seeds of being sown in the soil. The first crop of weeds is being removed. One corner will be cultivated with plants to attract local pollinators, bees and butterflies. The garden will be surrounded by sunflowers and marigolds. The garden has both a lot of produce people especially like – tomatoes, lettuce, green beans – as well as eggplants, kale, radishes and peppers. They’ve also planted potatoes. There’s also an abundance of herbs. Anyone is free to stop by and pick, and anyone is free to stop by Saturday mornings from about 9 and until noon, to help maintain the garden. New this year, will…


Ancient Mediterranean artisan gets first solo show at Toledo Museum of Art

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART The first major museum exhibition focused on the art and career of the influential ancient Mediterranean artist known as the Berlin Painter will visit the Toledo Museum of Art July 8 through Oct. 1, 2017. Eighty-four vessels and statuettes of bronze and terracotta from the early fifth century B.C. will be shown – including dozens of the finest vases attributed to the Berlin Painter along with works by other noteworthy artists of the period. University of Oxford scholar Sir John Beazley (1885-1970) identified the work of a single anonymous artist in over 200 vessels worldwide, and named him after a characteristically painted vase found in a museum in Berlin in 1911. The exhibition features masterpieces on loan from 15 renowned museums and two private collections, including the British Museum; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; J. Paul Getty Museum; Vatican Museums; Musée du Louvre and the Antikensammlung, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. “The Berlin Painter and His World represents the exceedingly rare opportunity for the individual style of one of the most important and prolific ceramic artists in history to be traced through extraordinary works of art gathered together from around the world,” said TMA Director, President and CEO Brian P. Kennedy, Ph.D. “It also provides a rich glimpse of Athenian life 2,500 years ago.” Divided into four sections – “The Berlin Painter’s World,” “The Berlin Painter’s Style,” “Gods” and “Heroes” – the exhibition explores a range of painted subjects, from athletics and musical performances to the rich body of Greek myth and epic. “We look forward to making these wondrous works of ancient painting and ceramics approachable and engaging for contemporary audiences,” said Adam Levine, Ph.D., TMA associate director and associate curator of ancient art. The exhibition was organized by J. Michael Padgett, Ph.D., curator of ancient art at the Princeton University Art Museum, and is on view there through June 11, 2017, before arriving at TMA the following month. The Berlin Painter and His World is accompanied by an extensive illustrated catalogue published by the Princeton University Art Museum, which includes nine essays and 84 object entries, including new attributions to the artist, by leading international scholars in the field. Tickets to the special exhibition will be $10 for general admission; students and TMA members are free. A host of educational programs and events will be organized in conjunction with the exhibition….


Bethany Ash receives BGSU Rookie of the Year Award for work with COSMOS

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Beginning a new job is challenging enough, but Bethany Ash, research program manager for COSMOS (Northwest Ohio Center of Excellence in STEM Education), has not only mastered her own duties since joining Bowling Green State University in February 2016, she has already made improvements to the program to further benefit students. She has also taken on an additional role left vacant by a departing staff member. Ash was recognized for her many contributions with the 2017 Rookie of the Year Award at the Administrative Staff spring reception and awards. The Rookie of the Year is awarded annually by Administrative Staff Council in recognition of an administrative staff member who has played an integral part in implementing an idea, program or procedure designed to enhance or improve student recruitment, retention and/or engagement. To be eligible for the award, employees must have worked at BGSU a minimum of one year but no more than three years. As manager of the research program, Ash works on multiple projects and grant programs. She works very closely with students who conduct water quality research, providing them with an experiential learning opportunity and a chance to be a part of local, state and national discussions surrounding water quality and farm run-off. “In mid-2016 Beth learned that the grants covering the research did not have funding for students to work in the lab and that the students were volunteering their time,” said her nominator, Jessica Belcher, COSMOS associate director. “She took it upon herself to write a grant specifically to fund the students’ work. Because of her efforts these students now receive funding to pay for their time in the lab and the materials needed to conduct their own research. She went above and beyond to ensure that these students can succeed at BGSU. She is not funded in any way by this new grant but has to do the work to manage it. She added work to her own plate in order to help students and ensure their success. “That is a true sign of an amazing BGSU staff member!” In addition to her primary role in the department, Ash assists in the coordination of the Academic Investment in Mathematics and Science scholarship program. “Beth has made countless improvements to the AIMS program including a restructuring of the AIMS summer bridge program to make it more cohesive and beneficial to…


BG remembers its war dead on Memorial Day

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Greg Robinette, a retired Army colonel, said raising flags and flowers on Memorial Day is a fitting way to honor those who died in the nation’s wars. People also need to do more. Robinette was the marshal of the Memorial Day parade in Bowling Green Monday and delivered the keynote address. “We must be engaged in preserving freedom,” Robinette said in the ceremonies at Oak Grove Cemetery. “We cannot let it be eroded either by apathy or activism or else they would have died in vain.” The best way to honor “the sacrifice by our fallen heroes is by living the freedom they have secured for us.” That can be as simple as voting. It can mean volunteering at churches and schools, to share the history of our country, “and the positive impact hit’s had around the world.” And, he added, “we can pray every day that brave and patriotic women and men will continue to accept the challenge of wearing a military uniform.” More than a million men and women from the American Revolution to Army Green Beret Mark De Alencar, who died fighting in Afghanistan in April, have been killed in the nation’s wars. The war on terrorism, Robinette warned, will not have the clear conclusion of a treaty that other wars have had. Peace may elude the country, and continue for years. The commemoration started under blue skies with temperatures in the 70s with a parade that moved from outside the post office on Washington Street, down Main Street, then up Court and onto the Oak Grove Cemetery. Wreaths were placed at the war memorial on the grounds of the Wood County Courthouse. Music was provided by the Bowling Green High School band, and by young vocalist Evie Van Vorhis, who sang “America the Beautiful” and “Battle Hymn of the Republic.” The 14th Ohio Volunteer Infantry fired salute volleys in front of the Cla-Zel, at the court house, and finally at the conclusion of the ceremony at Oak Grove. The unit’s presence was one of several reminders of the holiday’s roots in the Civil War. Former city administrator and veteran John Fawcett read General Logan’s Order, the directive by General John A. Logan to establish a day to remember those “who died in the late Rebellion.” Also, Mayor Dick Edwards read Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. Not everyone was comfortable with the tone…


Michael McLaughlin, Robert Snyder win BGSU classified staff awards for caring for lab animals

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Like most classified staff members, Michael McLaughlin and Robert Snyder serve the needs of students and faculty. But their responsibilities also include nonhuman clients. As the Bowling Green State University Animal Facilities technicians, they care for research subjects such as pigeons and rats. In addition, they maintain the research facilities for faculty and students in the areas of biology, forensic science and psychology. Their dedication to their wards and to enabling research to be conducted in a clean, safe and compliant situation have earned them the 2017 Classified Staff Team Award. The award was presented May 17 at the annual Classified Staff Council reception and ceremony. The team will share a $1,500 award and their names will be displayed on a commemorative plaque in the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Caring for animals is a seven-day-a week job, with no holidays and no two days the same. The University has two on-campus facilities plus a satellite location. McLaughlin and Snyder work diligently to ensure that not only are the needs of the animals met, but also the needs of the faculty, staff and students who utilize the facilities in their own important work, said Jenifer Baranski, director of BGSU animal research facilities. Each research project is different, with different requirements, but all must meet strict federal guidelines for safety and the well-being of the animals. McLaughlin and Snyder are thorough and careful in maintaining these standards while making sure that researchers have what they need to conduct their studies. Dr. Jon Sprague, Bureau of Criminal Investigation Eminent Scholar and director of the Center for the Future of Forensic Science, is also now the chair of Bowling Green’s Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC), which is tasked with ensuring that the University is in compliance with all regulations. “BGSU has received and continues to receive positive inspection reports, which is due predominantly to the efforts of Mike and Rob,” he said in his letter of nomination for the Team Award. Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus Lee Meserve, who spent 13 years as IACUC chair, noted that “since Rob and Mike interact with experimental animals on a daily basis, they become the de facto eyes and ears of the IACUC” and provide helpful hints about how to better care for and maintain the animals. The team’s efforts have built for BGSU a strong reputation among outside research…


Reading 1,000 books to preschoolers adds up to kindergarten readiness

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Children’s Place at the Wood County Library is building on its summer reading program for school age children to launch a new program for infants through preschoolers. The library is challenging parents and child caregivers, and others in youngsters’ lives to read them 1,000 books before they enter kindergarten. Children’s librarian Maria Simon said she’s wanted to offer the national initiative as a incentive to get parents, child caregivers, relatives, and maybe even a grandparent, via Skype reading to youngsters. The program will be launched Saturday, June 3, from 10 a.m. to noon in the library atrium. Denise Fleming, an award winning author and illustrator, will be on hand. Each child who is enrolled will receive a copy of Fleming’s book “Alphabet Under Construction,” which ties into the summer reading theme “Building a Better World.” If there’s more than one child in the family signing up, another Fleming title will be available. About 100 children have already been enrolled. Simon is hoping younger siblings will sign up as older children sign up for the summer reading program. The kick-off will also include an Early Childhood Resource Fair presented by the Wood County Early Childhood Task Force as well as local childcare providers and agencies. Simon said each booth will have some sort of literacy activity. She said she’s letting them know about Fleming’s other books – she’s published more than 20 since 1991. Fleming will give a presentation to children and families, and then to those participating in the resource fair. Fleming lives in her hometown Toledo where she creates her illustrations painting with pulp. “She understands the value of this program,” Simon said. “Everyone who reads to kids is a fan of hers.” The 1,000 books goal is flexible. It can mean the same book read many times. Simon said she recently read “Alphabet Under Construction” three times to a group of children, along with singing the alphabet three books, she said. A book a day makes the goal in three years, three books a day achieves it in a year. Tiffany Rathburn said that at first 1,000 books seemed like a lot, until library staff explained all the ways that it could be accomplished. Telling a story to her 19-month-old Zoey counts, or having her 9-year-old Alexis read to her little sister counts. Rathburn said her older kids are involved in…


Marsha Bostelman presented with service award at BGSU

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Persistence, kindness, professionalism and skill are but some of the characteristics Marsha Bostelman brings to her job as administrative assistant in the Department of Marketing at Bowling Green State Universty. Her unflagging commitment to excellence and service was Marsha Bostelman recognized with the presentation of the 2017 Classified Staff Outstanding Service Award, given to Bostelman at the annual Classified Staff Council awards and reception on May 17. She received a $1,000 check and a plaque bearing her name, to be permanently displayed on the second floor of the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Bostelman’s role in keeping the department running smoothly is appreciated by faculty, administrators and students alike, and they joined to nominate her for the award. “Marsha’s wealth of information, understanding of institutional policy and legacy knowledge of the University is inimitable,” wrote marketing faculty members Kirk Kern and Drs. Douglas Ewing and Jeffrey Meyer. “Her talents for efficient organization and effective communication with our faculty members and department chair keeps our diverse department operating. In short, she is invaluable.” “To say that Marsha exhibits exemplary job performance (one of the criteria for the award) is an understatement,” said former faculty member and chair Dr. Susan Kleine. “In fact, in an annual performance review, it is a challenge to identify something Marsha could improve; her work is nothing less than excellent in every way.” The marketing department is a challenging environment, her nominators agreed. Comprising a variety of disciplines from marketing to entrepreneurship to business communications to BIZX to hospitality management, it serves all business students plus others outside the College of Business Administration. Simply scheduling classes is a complex undertaking, but one Bostelman has the expertise and knowledge to accomplish, Kleine said. She also manages course evaluations for 100 sections, which became even more of a challenge when an electronic system was introduced. For that, Bostelman initiated training from ITS and worked with support staff to implement the new system and decide what needed to be communicated to faculty and students — taking a completely positive attitude toward an “onerous task.” “She saw it as an opportunity to improve the department and also to learn something and tackle a new challenge,” Kleine said. “Marsha enjoys mastering new things and solving puzzles; she approaches such challenges with intellectual rigor, creativity and a high degree of persistence. These characteristics contribute to her ability to…


Tom McLaughlin returning to the land of his ancestors

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Tom McLaughlin was walking in the rain recently. When a driver stopped and asked if he wanted a ride, McLaughlin declined. He was getting ready for Ireland. The 82-year-old native of Bowling Green, who made his career elsewhere before returning to his hometown 25 years ago, is on the move again. At the end of July he’ll begin a long journey, first by train and then by plane, to his new home in Cornamona in Ireland’s County Galway. There he’ll continue his studies in the Irish language, memorize the poetry of William Butler Yeats and soak in the music and dancing. “Wherever they have traditional music, I’ll be there,” he said. For McLaughlin, it’s a return to a land his family left several generations ago. His late wife Kathleen, who had a keen interest in genealogy, located records of a great grandparent in Pennsylvania. McLaughlin’s own grandparents lived in Bowling Green where he was born. When he was just about ready to enter high school his parents moved north to Oregon. (He still gets together for lunch with members of the Bowling Green High Class of 1953.) In September, 2015, McLaughlin, traveled to Ireland with his five grown children. His eldest son, Tom Jr., was suffering from the cancer that would claim him in June, 2016. Tom Jr .had a deep love of Irish music and dancing, and as a naturalist a fascination with the cliffs and the birds that swirled about them. They located the ancestral plot in Northern Ireland. They explored the culture and the nature. And they hatched an idea. Why not buy a place in Ireland, with everyone having a stake, where they could visit? A second home in the ancestral homeland. They even considered opening a bed and breakfast. When McLaughlin returned home, he had more immediate concerns. He had been diagnosed with colon cancer, and his time was occupied caring for Tom Jr. The idea of the Irish homestead seemed to fade. Then came the November election, McLaughlin said his son, Bill, a fire chief in Colorado, and McLaughlin’s three daughters, Colleen, Maureen, and Pegeen, came home for Thanksgiving. Bill, McLaughlin said, “couldn’t understand how Trump got elected.” Now was the time to realize the dream. So McLaughlin and his son flew over in March and found a place, and Tom Sr. negotiated to buy it with the…


Jeffery Jackson’s work directing Career Center earns Ferrari honors at BGSU

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The criteria for the Administrative Staff’s annual Dr. Michael R. Ferrari Award include innovation and initiative, high performance and building relationships with the University community. Jeffery Jackson, the 2017 winner of the top Jeffery Jackson administrative staff award, exhibits all those and more, according to his nominators. Jackson, assistant vice president for student career success and director of the Career Center, received the award, which comes with a $1,000 cash prize and a reserved parking spot for a year, at the spring reception hosted by Administrative Staff Council. “Jeff truly embodies all three attributes of this prestigious award,” wrote Danielle Dimoff, associate director of the Career Center. “He is known for his energetic and optimistic attitude when working through student concerns, while demonstrating a sense of compassion toward every individual. He is an innovative leader who goes above and beyond the responsibilities of his position. He is a relationship builder who strives to strengthen University partnerships with stakeholders. He is a strategic thinker who approaches each new challenge as a new opportunity. Above all, he is an educator who recognizes and cares about the success and future of Bowling Green State University.” Jackson has been involved with creative new approaches to ensure the career readiness of BGSU graduates, Dimoff said. These include partnering with the Office of Pre-Major Advising to support students through the Deciding Student Program with such activities as Major Match-Up, the Career and Life Planning course and numerous others. He also helped develop the Falcon Internship Guarantee Program, designed to prepare first-year students experiential learning opportunities. And along with that, he created the Falcon Internship Guarantee Ambassador and Career Center Student Ambassador programs, which provide students opportunities to serve their peers while gaining leadership experience. Students who have served as Career Center Student Ambassadors report how much they gained from it, and several have gone on to pursue careers in higher education. These activities and more reflect “Jeff’s efforts to support students in not just finding a job, but finding a fulfilling career path,” Dimoff said. Jackson has taken the lead on enhancing partnerships between employers, students, faculty and staff members across the country. He created and implemented the Employer Symposium to bring these groups together and engage in meaningful dialogue on career-related topics, Dimoff said. He also served as project director for three Ohio Means Internships and Co-ops grants…


Genevieve Simon’s Bowling Green roots inform work headed to Cincy Fringe Festival

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Genevieve Simon was a junior at Bowling Green High School she didn’t get the part she wanted in the school musical “West Side Story.” Instead of a role with a lot of singing and dancing, the director Jo Beth Gonzalez cast Simon as Anybodys, a tom boy who hangs out with the Jets, who ignore her. But she persists. “She was this strange girl who wanted to be a boy.” Simon ended up loving the role even though it has few lines. That didn’t mean it she wasn’t acting. “I started to learn how to be on stage when it’s not about you.” Simon learned to listen intently to the story. She fashioned a deep inner life for Anybodys, contemplating her role in the social structure, and projecting that even if she was in the shadows. “I was able to explore and learn how to be on stage and listen, how to be part of a group – who do I feel most loyal to, most scared of, and who do I hate?” “I look back at that and am so grateful she gave me that challenge,” Simon said in a recent telephone interview from her home in New York City. That experience not only has played into her development as a professional actor now working in New York, but it has inspired a new play, “Romeo + Juliet + Anybodys,” that will be performed at the Cincinnati Fringe Festival June 6, 8, and 10. For details visit: http://www.cincyfringe.com. The play brings Anybodys out of the shadows and into the spotlight. Simon said the idea for the play came to her about a year ago while riding the subway. She was reading a book in which a female character was simply called No Name. This frustrated Simon. Why would the author not give her a name? Then the train stopped, and it made a familiar metallic noise, which happens to mimic the first three notes of the song “Somewhere” from “West Side Story.” That got Simon thinking about this other female character with no name whom she’d played. For fun, she started writing in Anybodys’ voice, exploring her view of the tragedy. Simon discovered that “she had a lot to say.” Anybodys is there at pivotal moments. “But nobody listens.” Simon also looked at Shakespeare’s “Rome and Juliet.” There’s no character like Anybodys…