Articles by David Dupont

Chautauqua returning to Rossford, July 19-23

From the ROSSFORD CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU If history was your favorite subject in school, or even if it wasn’t, you will be amazed and delighted when history comes to life before your very eyes in Rossford July 19-23. The Rossford Convention & Visitors Bureau received a grant from Ohio Humanities in Columbus to produce the local event. Join us at Rossford Veterans Park & Marina along the banks of the Maumee River for Chautauqua Rossford 2017, “Seeds of Change: America in the Early 20th Century” featuring a keynote performance of ‘Gone With the Wind’ author Margaret Mitchell by Chautauqua veteran Debra Conner Other characters include Henry Ford, Amelia Earhart, John Barrymore and Nikola Tesla. Rossford High School students will portray influential figures from local NW Ohio history including Edward Ford, Florence Scott Libbey and Samuel ‘Golden Rule’ Jones. Building on the 19th-century tradition established on the shores of New York’s Chautauqua Lake, Chautauqua Rossford is a five-day event that combines living history performances, music, education, and audience participation into a one-of-a-kind cultural event the entire community will enjoy. “Combining Riverfest with the local Chautauqua this year will create a bigger and better experience for locals and visitors alike,” said Rick Reichow of the Rossford Business Association. Favorite Riverfest events such as the fireworks, beer tent and games for the kids will take place on Saturday evening, July 22nd . The troupe is under the tutelage of Jeremy Meier at the new Chautauqua training program at Owens Community College, which also received an Ohio Humanities grant for the program. “The interactive presentation style of Chautauqua promotes an exciting interaction between audience and performer,” said Meier. “It’s a wonderful way to learn and reflect upon historical events and see their significance in contemporary times.” Enjoy evening performances along with side trips, events and activities during this 5-day living history extravaganza. Sunday, July 23rd is planned as a family day with hands-on activities under the tent, performances by the high school scholars and a special preview of the Rossford Recreation production of Ronald Dahl’s Willy Wonka Jr. This program is made possible in part by Ohio Humanities, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.


Alberto Gonzalez finds distinction close to home

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Professor Alberto Gonzalez has come a long way and not far at all. The first time Alberto Gonzalez set foot on the Bowling Green State University campus was when he and his twin brother, Gil, arrived to move into Kohl Hall. Sons of a Mexican American worker from nearby Sandusky County, they hadn’t done college visits. For them even heading 30 miles west to Bowling Green was a major move. In a way it was their generation’s migration. Their grandparents had been born in Mexico. Their parents were born in south Texas. They grew up in rural Riley Township near Fremont, and now they were attending college. Alberto Gonzalez graduated from BGSU in 1977 before continuing his graduate work in communications at Ohio State where he earned a doctorate. He ended up returning home to teach, and at its February meeting the university’s board of trustees named him a distinguished university professor. Gonzalez, who has taught at the university since 1992, was pleased with the honor for more than what it said about him. “For me it brings attention to the School of Communications and speaks to the quality of work, the quality of research done in this school,” he said on a recent interview. “You never do anything isolation. All the things I’ve been able to accomplish is because of having great colleagues around me and having great doctoral students. I learn from them and publish with them.” In the resolution approved by trustees one of his former students, Eun Young Lee, was quoted as saying: “He provides me with a model for what it truly means to be an academic, which I am now trying to pass on to my students. … He has made me genuinely believe in and adopt the pedagogical value that each student in college deserves hearty and sincere guidance.” Gonzalez said that the honor for him is also gives affirmation and encouragement to faculty of color and students of color. Gonzalez has built his career on the scholarship in intercultural communication studies. He’s written books and articles and is the co-author of one of the most prominent texts “Our Voices: Culture, Ethnicity, and Communication,” now in its sixth edition with a seventh in the works. Gonzalez learned early what it is to…


BG writer adds her voice to “The Nasty Women Project”

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News For Kirsty Sayer, the rise of Donald Trump was personal. The Bowling Green woman was just starting to emerge from a complex Post-Traumatic Stress when Trump started his general election campaign. What she felt was more than political disagreement. His inescapable appearance triggered something deep inside. Emotions that she was just starting to come to grips with. Deep trauma that had controlled her life. Now Sayers saw in Trump a reflection of the older family member who has sexually abused her. And the candidate’s dismissive attitude toward the women who accused him of sexual improprieties, including assault, reminded her of how her abuser treated her. They were cut from the same cloth, both domineering narcissists. So Sayer was one of so many other women who “gritted our teeth” as the election approached, waiting for it to be over. Hopeful, even confident, that after Nov. 8 they’d be done with Donald Trump. Then the votes were counted, in Florida, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Michigan and Ohio. “There was a sense of great helplessness,” Sayer said. “We were just unmoored. Nobody was really expecting it. … Now what?” For Sayer and about 80 other women, the answer to that question includes bringing their written reactions to Trump’s election together in a book “The Nasty Women Project,” available today (March 1) through the website http://nastywomenproject.com. All the proceeds will benefit Planned Parenthood. “This is a labor of love. Nobody’s taking any money,” Sayer said. “Women particularly feel better when they have something to channel their energies into, and when they are connected with other people in well doing. It’s therapeutic.” For Sayer, who blogs and  has published in magazines, it was “a difficult time.” “I needed a project,” she said, and she had a story that was demanding to be told, but she didn’t feel quite ready. She connected with the project’s editor Erin Elizabeth Passons. They agreed her piece would fit within the parameters of the project. Sayer sent a draft, a self-of-consciousness story, overflowing its narrative bounds. A naturalized citizen as of this summer, Sayer had just two years ago let her family back in South Africa know about the abuse she suffered, and it caused a severe rift in the family. The revelation also caused internal turmoil. Her identity was…


Residents to lift voices in protest song at Grounds for Thought

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When people are frustrated, sometimes the only thing to do is sing. Pastor Mary Jane Saunders, of the First Presbyterian Church, knows many people are concerned about the current state of affairs, and she decided to help organize an event that will enable them to give voice to their frustrations. She was inspired in part by a video of Pete Seeger, Holly Near and others who use music as a form of activism. So Friday, March 3, at 7 p.m. ‘Singing for Our Lives: Empowering the People through Song’ will be presented at Grounds for Thought, 174 S. Main St., Bowling Green. Saunders enlisted the local ukulele quartet the GRUBs – Grande Royale Ukulelists of the Black Swamp – to be the house band for the event. Sheri Wells-Jensen, of the GRUBS, said the set list will include both old and new material. The GRUBS have already dipped their toes, or ukuleles, into current issues when they recorded “Where’s Bob?” a humorous song about Republican U.S. Rep. Bob Latta’s unwillingness to hold a town hall meeting. Wells-Jensen and her husband, Jason Wells-Jensen, added their voices to last Sunday’s rally to support immigrants. They have written a call and response blues number “Send Them All to Me” for “Singing for Our Lives,” she said. “The purpose is to reintroduce people to the power of singing together and why people do that,” Wells-Jensen said. The event seeks “to reclaim the label ‘protest music,’ and to give people permission to ditch that label if it gets in the way.” “We Shall Overcome” has to be on the setlist, Wells-Jensen said. They will also include “This Land Is Your Land” with all the verses. The Woody Guthrie classic has come to be perceived as a harmless ditty, but taken in its entirety it is “a marvelously rich and wide-ranging song that includes a lot of people,” she said. “We’ll sing patriotic music, too,” she said, “because these folks are patriots.” So “America the Beautiful” will be on the program. Even if a song doesn’t connect with their concerns, it may mean something to the person sitting next to them. “The thing is you don’t have to love all the songs,” Wells-Jensen said. “These are not songs for the individual these are songs for…


“Activism from Where You Are” theme of BGSU Women’s History Month events

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS “Activism from Where You Are” is the theme of the keynote event in this year’s Women’s History Month celebrations at Bowling Green State University. New York poet and political activist Staceyann Chin will conduct a workshop on the topic Saturday, March 18 , from 5-8 p.m. Chin, an “out” poet and Jamaican national, has starred in the Tony Award-nominated “Def Poetry Jam on Broadway,” has performed in “Voices of a People’s History of the United States,” in one-woman shows off-Broadway and at the Nuyorican Poets’ Café. The workshop, geared toward students, she will share her own story about how a girl “born into denial and contempt can grow up resilient, sane and full of purpose.” The workshop will include a gathering of participants’ family narratives and how those unique narratives can inform their activism. Pre-registration for the workshop is required. Email the Women’s Center at womencenter@bgsu.edu. The overarching theme of the month’s events is “Get in Formation: Women of Color and Contemporary Activism.” Sponsored by the Women’s Center and the Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program, there are activities for people of all ages. Below is a sampling of what’s happening. The annual “Toss the Tiara,” an alternative dress-up day for boys and girls, takes place from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday (March 4) in the Lenhart Grand Ballroom at the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Also on March 18, the National Council of Negro Women Empowerment Conference will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Pre-registration is also required for this event. Faculty members from BGSU and other universities will speak at and host conferences and events throughout the month. On March 22, “Focused Falcons: BGSU Alumni Activists” will feature a panel discussion facilitated by Dr. Sandra Faulkner, director of the Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program. The discussion begins at noon in the Women’s Center, 107 Hanna Hall. A discussion on “Indigenous and International Women Activists,” at 2:30 p.m. March 23 in 410 Kuhlin Center, will be moderated by Dr. Jackie Sievert, political science. Dr. Nicole Jackson, history, will lead a screening and discussion of Beyoncé’s “Lemonade” at 7 p.m. March 27 in 107 Hanna Hall. She will also present “Say Her Name: Justice and Honor for Murdered Black Women” at…


Air Force & School of Human Movement, Sport & Leisure Studies form partnership

From 88th Air Base Wing Office of Public Affairs The Air Force Research Laboratory’s 711th Human Performance Wing has signed an Educational Partnership Agreement with Bowling Green State University’s School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies due to a mutual interest in the areas of human biomechanics and three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis. An EPA is a type of technology transfer agreement between a federal laboratory and an educational institution that enables the transfer or development of technological resources and applications, such as equipment, facilities and professional expertise. Under this agreement, AFRL’s 711th Human Performance Wing and Bowling Green State University, a public university in Ohio, collaboratively developed research projects to be conducted at BGSU. The 711 HPW loaned motion analysis equipment to BGSU, which enabled BGSU students and faculty to conduct research of benefit to both parties. Several research papers have been published regarding the multiple projects that were conducted through the equipment loan. “The purpose of the EPA is to encourage and enhance study in scientific disciplines. AFRL/711 HPW found that working with BGSU was mutually beneficial and validated the importance of partnering with academia,” said Jennifer Whitestone, biomedical engineer, AFRL 711 HPW. “Sharing technologies and assets with our BGSU colleagues offers a unique collaborative opportunity that can lead to new ideas, innovations, and solutions to help solve our current Air Force challenges as we help to develop the bright young minds that will become part of tomorrow’s workforce.” Access to collaborative resources allowed researchers to analyze concealed objects of various sizes in the torso and the changes that occurred to the size, shape and motion of an individual. The datasets collected are expected to result in improvements of defense and security processes for the military. Research efforts were also made in the area of simulated entry control point development for evaluating human deception and its influence on human dynamics when individuals were near a simulated air base, town or other restricted security checkpoint. When illegal objects made it through the checkpoint undetected, individuals received a monetary incentive of $100. Projects of interest to the School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies have been conducted to analyze soccer kicking and hockey slap shot techniques. Results from this research included a discovery in the differences between how skilled and unskilled soccer players use the…


Contemporary music is at center stage at BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When the New Music Gathering arrives at Bowling Green State University next May 11-13, it will be further confirmation that the College of Musical Arts has become a Midwestern center of contemporary music. That reputation is grounded in the New Music Festival, which started in 1980 and staged every October. The university is also one of only two that offers a doctorate with a specialty in contemporary music. That gives it a foothold with the younger generation of performers, composers and impresarios A series of performances by visiting and resident performers in the past week has demonstrated the extent to which contemporary music has been infused into the culture of the College of Musical Arts. A series of in-house concerts this week further elaborates on the theme. This activity testifies to contemporary music’s place at center stage at BGSU. The opening act for this un-festival was the biggest name, Roomful of Teeth. The voice ensemble arrived Wednesday as the guest artist for the Dorothy E. and DuWayne H. Hansen series. The ensemble has won a Grammy, and its signature piece “Partita for 8 Voices,” composed by one of its members Caroline Shaw, won a Pulitzer. The ensemble was the epitome how the Hansens envisioned for the series. They want to bring inspirational artists to campus to share their skills and artistic philosophies with students and the broader community. The ensemble worked with students on campus and made an appearance at Bowling Green High School, sharing the joy and immediacy of new music wherever they went. At a master class for voice students, ensemble members were able to pinpoint spots where a student singer needed help, and then suggest simple techniques to address the issue with immediate results. I expect we’ll hear some of these songs in a few weeks during the Conrad Art Song Competition on April 8. All of the ensemble singers who traveled to Bowling Green – Shaw and founder and conductor Brad Wells were not able to make the residency – answered questions from students and faculty. They offered advice about preparing for performances – as contradictory as one would expect from a group of individuals with different experience – and the necessity of solid theoretical grounding, on which there was unanimity. Learn to sight sing….


BGSU’s Eric Dubow named Distinguished Research Professor for work of a lifetime

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Eric Dubow, professor of clinical psychology, takes on a research project, he’s in it for the long run. One study he’s been involved in started about the time he was born. Now his graduate students are using its data as the basis for their theses. That’s more than a life’s work. Earlier this month the Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees designated Dubow as a Distinguished Research Professor. From the beginning of his graduate work at the University of Illinois-Chicago, Dubow’s scholarship has focused on “how the observation of aggression and violence, whether it’s in the media, the family, the neighborhood, leads someone to be more aggressive. … We develop a way of thinking, attitudes that justify violence as a behavioral choice. … But certainly there are some kids who observe these things who don’t become aggressive. So we look at protective factors.” Positive parentings, social engagement, education, all can help foster resilience in young people, he said. His graduate mentors were working on a longitudinal study of a cohort of people in Columbia County in New York, an area on the east side of the Hudson between Albany and New York City. The study started in 1960. Researchers interviewed all the third graders in the county and their parents. Those subjects were 30 when Dubow joined the study as a graduate student. Now they are about 65, and the study includes interviews with their children. In a longitudinal study ‘“you keep going back and interviewing them again and again and again.” The study is now being conducted through the Institute for Social Research, a free standing research institute located at the University of Michigan. Dubow is a researcher at the institute as well as holding his position at BGSU. He affiliated with the institute in 1994, eight years after joining the BGSU faculty. The study, he said, was the first to determine a link between seeing violence on television and aggressive behavior in children. The institute is also studying children aged 8, 11 and 14 in Palestine and Israel. Every four years they’ve gone back and interviewed the youngsters and their parents in the home. “We’re looking at violent behavior and post-traumatic stress that develops as a result of exposure to political violence.” While it’s obvious…


BG residents rally to support immigrants

About 150 people have gathered Sunday evening on the green space in downtown Bowling Green to condemn the Trump Administration’s recent executive orders on immigration and to offer support to the migrants in their midst. Tighter immigration laws and enforcement threaten not just to keep people out but to break up American families now in the country. Beatriz Maya of La Conexion de Wood County said workers come here to work at jobs others do not want. Driving them out will hurt the economy. The rally is scheduled to last until 6 p.m.


Forum on future of ACA generates healthy debate

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News A town hall forum on the future of health care drew about 150 people. Many of them had something to say. Many had questions for their legislators. Lawmakers, though, were in short supply. The dais in the front of the community room in the Bowling State University student union had signs representing a bipartisan all-star team of no-shows, including U.S. Rep. Bob Latta and U.S. Rep. Marcy Kaptur. Kaptur did send a letter expressing her regret at not being present and praising the attendees for getting involved. Two state lawmakers did make the forum. State Sen. Randy Gardner (R-Bowling Green) and State Rep. Michael Sheehy (D-Oregon). Gardner, as a Republican, knew he was in hostile territory, but he received applause on several occasions for showing up, listening to comments, sometime shouted, even when they were expressed while he was still talking. Gardner could not provide what many in the crowd wanted, any sort of commitment to take specific action. As Dr. Johnathan Ross, of Toledo, noted little of what concerned the crowd was in the hands of state government. Gardner made it clear that his purview was the state, and he urged those present, a large number of whom were his constituents, based on a show of hands, to monitor the progress of the state budget. As a legislator, he said, it is his job to listen to his 360,000 “bosses”– and that means not coming to a conclusion about anything as soon as it is presented. He said he hopes the forum is just part of an ongoing give-and-take between himself and his constituents. He must channel the personal stories into some kind of legislation as he’s done decades ago after hearing about family with a child with hemophilia. He’s now working with a family with a child with cystic fibrosis on legislation that may assist them. As a legislator that’s what he does. He tries to address the concerns of constituents through legislation. What Gardner refused to do was take a stand on the Affordable Care Act, nor would he comment on plans to replace the ACA with tax credits. Concerns for the fate of the law known as Obamacare were what led to Our Revolution in Northwest Ohio to stage the town hall meeting. Dennis Slotnick,…


Quince’s advocacy for a place in new music for female voices bears fruit

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News For three members of Quince Contemporary Vocal Ensemble, the concert on Monday at Bowling Green State University is a homecoming. The ensemble got its start here when three members met. Amanda DeBoer Bartlett, Liz Pearse and Kayleigh Butcher studied with Jane Schoonmaker Rodgers in the College of Musical Arts as graduate students. Carrie Henneman Shaw is the fourth member of the ensemble. Fittingly their concert will be devoted to a single work “Love fail” by David Lang. They met the composer when he visited BGSU as the guest composer at the New Music Festival on campus.in 2011. The free Music on the Forefront concert will be Monday, Feb. 27, in Bryan Recital Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center. The hour-long piece is more than four women singing. They break into duos and trios, said Kayleigh Butcher, and each has a solo. They also are called on to play percussion and she even blows on  a conch shell. “Love fail,” was originally written for the early music group Anonymous 4. Since that venerable ensemble has retired, “we’ve taken up the reins,” Butcher said. The piece with text written by Lydia Davis revisits the myth of doomed lovers Tristan and Isolde. This will be a concert version of the piece, though Quince traveled with Lang to the Kody Festival in Lublin Poland last year to perform a theatrical production. “Love fail” is a haunting, spacious piece full of resonant dissonances and echoes of ancient chant. “Love fail” is one of the rare pieces for women’s voices in contemporary music. The desire to promote chamber music for the female voice inspired the formation of the ensemble at BGSU in 2009. BGSU is known as a Midwest hub music activity. “But we noticed there wasn’t a lot of avenues without starting it ourselves,” Butcher said. “Amanda and I wanted it to be an all-women’s group because there’s not a lot of that in the contemporary music world.” Voice is used as a solo instrument, and in small ensembles with instruments. “We started it as just a way for us to have a contemporary music outlet,” Butcher said. “There’s nothing more fun than a one-on-a-part chamber music setting with all women. Initially the ensemble started with five voices, hence the name Quince. By…


Soloists & orchestra are up to the task of challenging concerto concert program

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The soloists in Saturday’s concerto competition didn’t make it easy for their fellow students in The Bowling Green Philharmonia. Flutist Kenneth Cox said the orchestra parts have more notes than his solo part. And the solo part in Joan Tower’s Flute Concerto has plenty of notes jammed into its measures. Cox, who studies in the Bowling Green State University College of Musical Arts doctorate in contemporary music program, executes them with aplomb with the orchestra keeping pace. Michelle Whitmore said she’s heard from some orchestra members about some of the unusual sounds the score of her piece requires of them. But that’s what they should expect when the piece is John Corigliano’s “The Pied Piper Fantasy,” and they get to be the rats. Whitmore gets to make her entrance strolling through the orchestra. The program is no stroll in the park for the orchestra. Emily Freeman Brown said this was the most difficult concerto concert set the Philharmonia has tackled. And they’ve risen to the challenge. Tonight (Saturday, Feb. 25) at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center on the Bowling Green State University campus the Philharmonia will perform with the four winners of last December’ 50th Competition in Musical performance. Tickets are $10. Beside Cox and Whitmore, those performing will be junior Stephen Dubetz on clarinet performing Stephen Hartke’s Clarinet Concerto “Landscape in Blue” and graduate student Peisi Luo soloing on Maurice Ravel’s Piano Concerto for left hand. Each earned the honor of soloing with the orchestra by coming out on top of competition with 69 of the best musicians in the college. For Whitmore, a senior performance major, this was the first chance to solo with an orchestra. The experience, she said, is at once “terrifying” but also “really, really exciting to hear the different textures.” She has loved the piece since she was a freshman and heard another flutist play it. She was impressed by its theatricality. Whitmore decided she wanted to learn the piece when she was “good enough.” Now she’s contemplating continuing her flute studies in graduate school. She’s auditioned and is awaiting the results. So far she’s been accepted by the Royal College of Music in London. As a child flute was not her first choice of instrument. Originally she…


Mathis named dean of the College of Music Arts

Bowling Green State University has tapped an insider to lead its College of Musical Arts. Dr. William B. Mathis has been selected as the dean of the College of Musical Arts, Provost Rodney Rogers announced this morning. Mathis has been serving as interim dean since last July . BGSU conducted a national search, and Mathis was one of three finalists brought in for final interviews.  He “received strong support from faculty, staff and students,” Rogers said. Rogers also wrote: “In addition to serving as dean, Dr. Mathis will be responsible for leading the broader interdisciplinary arts strategy for BGSU.” Mathis joined the University as an assistant professor of trombone in 2000 and was promoted to full professor in 2013. In 2003, he began serving as coordinator of graduate studies and in 2006, he became chair of the Department of Music Performance Studies. He served un that position until he was appointed interim dean in 2016. “Dr. Mathis has a vigorous history of performance and has held a variety of teaching, mentoring and administrative positions, making him a well-rounded choice for this position,” Rogers wrote. He received his bachelor’s degree in music education from Wichita State University in 1986 and his Master of Music from the University of Michigan in 1987. He earned a D.M.A. in musical arts from the University of Michigan in 1992. The previous dean Dr. Jeffrey Showell announced he was stepping down last April after five years in the position.


Sanders supporters hope to spark discussion of health coverage after Obamacare

By DAVID DUPONT BG independent News The Republicans have been gunning for the Affordable Care Act since it passed without a single GOP vote. Now with control of both Congress and the White House, they are on the brink of doing it. The problem, according to Kris Johnson, a Northwest Ohio activist, is: “They want to get rid of ACA, but they can’t come up with a solution that’s any better Our Revolution in Northwest Ohio, a group Johnson is affiliated with, wants to help. Yes, they are a group that is taking up the mantle of Independent socialist Bernie Sanders’ failed run for the Democratic Party presidential nomination. “We are taking Bernie’s agenda and manifesting it any way we can,” said organizer Dennis Slotnick. Still they see a way out of the current logjam. One that addresses the problems that led to the passage of the ACA, and one that addresses that law’s flaws. Slotnick agrees with Sanders that while imperfect the law is “a lot better than what we had before.” More than 30 million people now have insurance who didn’t before, he said. And the law makes sure those with pre-existing conditions can still get insurance. What the ACA needs, he said, is a public option, where people can forego the private insurance market entirely. “We’re in a position of offering real solutions,” Slotnick said. Our Revolution in Northwest Ohio in conjunction with Single-Payer Action Network Ohio, a group that has been around for 20 years, want to be able to make their case face-to-face with legislators. On Saturday they will hold aT0own Hall on the Future of America’s Healthcare from 2-4:30 p.m. in Ballroom B at Bowling Green State University Student Union. While the hope is for U.S. Rep. Bob Latta (R-Bowling Green) to attend, his staff has said little beyond they will forward the information to him, according to Slotnick. Also invited has been U.S. Rep. Marcy Kaptur (D-Toledo) and about a dozen state legislators. As of mid-week Slotnick didn’t have any commitments from politicians to attend. Our Revolution has been around for a few months. This is its first major action. While Sanders is not officially affiliated with the group, it does have his blessing. Johnson said the action is taking place in Bowling Green “because Latta’s here.” “The…


La Conexion will hold rally Sunday

La Conexion de Wood County will hold a rally on Sunday, Feb 26 at 5 p.m. in Bowling Green’s Green Space across Church Street from the police station. The rally is being help to express support and solidarity for immigrants following the issuance of the Trump Administration’s recent executive orders on immigration. The rally is also in support of the city’s and Bowling Green State University’s efforts to build welcoming, safe and inclusive communities.