Articles by David Dupont

Irish duo to give listeners a taste of what’s coming to Black Swamp Arts Festival

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Even though Irish piper Cillian Vallely has performed before audiences of thousands around the world, he’ll still find time after a gig to sit in at a local jam session, or seisiun. The camaraderie of those spontaneous music gatherings have become a huge part of the propagating Irish music. “You can go all over the world and go into an Irish bar and find people playing this music. There’s a common repertoire,” said Vallely, who grew up in Northern Ireland. “A lot people are not taking it up to be a performer or a top player, they take it up because they like the company.” As a member of Lunasa, called “the hottest Irish acoustic group on the planet” by the Irish Times, he’s now at the pinnacle of Irish music, but he still likes to sit in. Vallely, on pipes and low whistle, and Lunasa bandmate Kevin Crawford, flute and whistle, will play a free show Friday May 12 at 7 p.m. at Grounds for Thought, 174 S. Main St., Bowling Green. The concert, sponsored by local Irish group Toraigh an Sonas, is a preview for the full quintet’s performance at the Black Swamp Arts Festival on Sept. 8. There was a time, Vallely said, when the music was dying out in Northern Ireland. Then in the 1960s folk revival brought it back to public attention. His parents were catalysts in helping bring the music back. Though avocational musicians, they founded Armagh Pipers Club in 1966, taught and went on tour. A few years later Cillian was born. “I grew up in this house full of instruments. Several days a week some kind of musical activity was going on.” He started on the tin whistle, then graduated to the pipes. He tried the fiddle “but it felt alien to me.” As a teenager he drifted away a bit. He was active in sports. He played flute in orchestra and saxophone in school combos. “But I always loved the music.” Still “it was down my list of priorities.” It was in his late teens “when I started getting really addicted to it.” “Once you get more into it, it’s amazing music. I just wanted to play it all the time,” he said. While having a push from the family helped, in the end “you have to do it on your own.” He has four…


BG Arts Council invites artists to get some fresh air

From BG ARTS COUNCIL The Bowling Green Arts Council and Bowling Green Parks and Recreation Department will host Art in the Park on the grounds of Simpson Garden Park, 1291 Conneaut Avenue, on Friday, June 9th from 4:30-7:30 p.m. Artists of all ages are invited to bring their easels and art supplies to the park to paint in the gardens for this event. Artists can register to participate by sending an email to blair@surrealogic.com. No sales can be made on Park premises; however, artists may bring a sample finished work and are encouraged to bring business cards to distribute. To encourage artist participation, The Art Supply Depō in Bowling Green has donated a $100 gift certificate for the artist voted “People’s Choice” by those in attendance. In addition to the artists at work, Art in the Park will feature hands-on arts activities for children. There will also be local musicians, music by students of the BGSU College of Musical Arts and performances by the Black Swamp Players and Horizon Youth Theatre. Some light refreshments will be provided.


Faculty celebrate milestones as BGSU trustees act on promotion & tenure (updated)

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The University celebrated milestones in faculty academic careers with the granting of promotion and, for some, tenure, approved by the Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees at its May 5 meeting. Promotion to Full Professor Timothy Brackenbury, communication sciences and disorders; Ellen Broido, higher education and student affairs; Larissa Szporluk Celli, English; Lynne Hewitt, communication sciences and disorders; Bob Lee, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies; Mingsheng Li, finance; John Liederbach, human services; Shannon Orr, political science; Andrew Pelletier, music performance studies; Valeria Grinberg Pla, romance and classical studies; Maria Rizzo, mathematics and statistics; Charles Saenz, music performance studies; Ray Schneider, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies; and Junfeng Shang, mathematics and statistics Tenure and Promotion to Associate Professor Leonel Carrillo, humanities, BGSU Firelands; Hyungsuk Choo, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies; Gregory Decker, musicology, composition and theory; Christopher Dietz, musicology, composition and theory; Stefan Fritsch, political science; Benjamin Greene, history; Adam Fullenkamp, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies; David Hampton, School Intervention Services; Lisa Hanasono, School of Media and Communication; Daniel Kelley, natural and social sciences, Firelands; Starr Keyes, School Intervention Services; Hee Soon Lee, human services; Mary-Jon Ludy, public and allied health; Vera Lux, library teaching and learning; Kate Magsamen-Conrad, School of Media and Communication; Mariana Mereoiu, School Intervention Services; Marco Nardone, physics and astronomy; Susan Nelson, music performance studies; Sarah Rainey, School of Cultural and Critical Studies; William Sawaya, management; Robert Snyder, library teaching and learning; Mihai Staic, mathematics and statistics; Jennifer Stucker, School of Art; Liangfeng Sun, physics and astronomy; Ram Veerapaneni, natural and social sciences, Firelands; Joseph Wagner, humanities, Firelands; and Hans Wildschutte, biological sciences Promotion to Senior Lecturer Jadwiga Carlson, computer science; Susan Carlton, General Studies Writing Program; Sara Chambers, theatre and film; Steven Chung, chemistry; Susan Cruea, General Studies Writing Program; Heath Diehl, English/Honors; Dryw Dworsky, psychology; Sherona Garrett-Ruffin, psychology; Sylvia Hermo-Fedro, applied sciences, Firelands; Cheryl Hoy, General Studies Writing; Harland Jones, General Studies Writing; Cheryl Lachowski, General Studies Writing; Lori Liggett, School of Media and Communication; Cynthia Mahaffey, General Studies Writing; Matthew Partin, biological sciences; Amy Rybak, General Studies Writing; Frank Rzicznek, General Studies Writing; Michael Schulz, General Studies Writing; Kelly Taylor, School of Media and Communication; Tamera Wales, biological sciences; Jennifer Warnke, English; Sherri Werdebaugh, General Studies Writing; and Ann Westrick, General Studies Writing Promotion…


Union contract bears fruit for BGSU lecturers

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees had a full house for its afternoon business session Friday. Being the last meeting of the academic year, the board had approvals for tenure and promotion on its agenda. The room was packed with those faculty, their colleagues, and family. One even came via Skype from across the Atlantic. Others, however, couldn’t attend because they had final exams to give. Friday’s list was larger than usual with 81 names. That full house represents the fruit of new provisions in the university’s contract with the BGSU-Faculty Association, which sets guidelines for non-tenured track faculty to be promoted. Of the 81 on the promotion and tenure list, 23 lecturers were promoted to senior lecturer and 17 instructors were promoted to lecturer. Also, 14 associate professors were promoted to full and 27 assistant professors received tenure and promotion to associate professor. (Complete list: http://bgindependentmedia.org/faculty-celebrate-milestones-as-bgsu-trustees-act-on-promotion-tenure/) Arts and Sciences Dean Ray Craig said later that the contract has meant procedures are more uniform across the colleges. As dean he had the most names to read – 48, with 33 of those were for promotions within the NTTF ranks. General Studies Writing had the most. Over the next few years the numbers of NTTF promotions will decline, he said,  as those eligible now will have already been promoted. NTTF faculty – instructors, lecturers, senior lecturers – make up 33 percent of BGSU’s full-time faculty on the main campus. In other action from the trustees’ Academic Affairs Committee, the full board approved the merger of the departments of German, Russian, East Asian Languages and Romance Languages and Classical Studies into a new department World Languages and Culture. When presenting the merger earlier this year to Faculty Senate, Nathan Richardson, chair of Romance Languages, said that no one knows why the two departments were separate. Possibly, he said, clashes among faculty. He assured the senate that even after the lengthy meetings needed to iron out the details of the merger, the faculty of the two departments were still on friendly terms. In introducing the merger, Provost Rodney Rogers said that the new, single department will increase efficiency while also fostering innovations. The trustees also approved a new Master’s in European Studies. The master’s program will be open to graduates from all disciplines as long as they have the required language skills. Such a program, Rogers…


BG community band celebrates with a lot of help from its friends

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Bowling Green Area Community Band called in the Marines to help celebrate the band’s 10th year. Saturday night, 10 years to the day of the band’s first concert, the BG ensemble, directed by Thom Headley and Catherine Lewis, hosted two other community bands The North Coast Concert Band, directed John Kustec, and the Defiance College Community Band, directed by Scott Rogers and Catherine Booth. And to help conduct all those musicians the hosts invited Capt. Ryan Nowlin, one of the leaders of what’s considered the world’s greatest concert band, the U.S. Marine’s Washington D.C. band, “The President’s Own.” And if that wasn’t enough as a guest soloist, they invited Amy Horn, a 30-year veteran of that band, as French horn soloist. From the opening National Anthem, done by the Defiance band in the Marine Band arrangement to the curtain call of “God Bless America,” taken at brisk tempo, the event was  celebration not just of BG Area Community Band, but to the American band tradition. There were stops at picturesque places and fittingly tributes some Ohio band directors. Aside from the introductions each piece, the assembled musicians let the music do the talking, and it spoke in volumes, even when playing hushed passages. The spectrum of the American band was represented from its pinnacle in the persons of Nowlin and Horn. Nowlin conducted a number with all three bands and the finale when all 200 musicians crowded on the Performing Arts Center stage. Each band also played one of his compositions. Horn soloed on “Hunter’s Moon” with the BG band. The piece was a wonderfully idiomatic display of the horn’s capabilities. There was even a humorous passage with slurs and intentionally wobbly rhythm, that made it seem like the hunter had imbibed in some moonshine. With all the current and retired band directors in the ranks of all three ensembles, the night was celebration of music education’s role in nurturing that musical tradition, from elementary school when kids first pick up and instrument through college and teaching. That’s the journey Nowlin has taken. He started studying piano at 4. His family had a player piano in the house, and he would tinkle on the keys. His grandmother asked him if he’d like her to give him lessons. He said “yes.” She made it clear: “We’re not going to mess around. We’re going to…


Remember BGSU & what it stands for, Coast Guard rear admiral tells graduates

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News For Rear Admiral June Ryan the path that led her to the Coast Guard was illuminated by the light of a television screen. She saw an advertisement for the Coast Guard at 3 in the morning – “the only time the Coast Guard can afford to advertise.” It featured the Midgett family from North Carolina’s Outer Banks who had members who served in the Coast Guard since before the Revolution. She decided she wanted to start her own tradition. As a sophomore at Bowling Green State University, she enlisted in the Coast Guard Reserve as a junior boatswain’s mate. Once a month she would report to the lighthouse at Marblehead, a lighthouse rich with history. It is the oldest continually operating lighthouse on the United States side of the Great Lakes. It had the first female lighthouse keeper and is near the site of one of the first rescues honored by the Gold Lifesaving Medal. Her career ended up taking her around the world, serving presidents as a military aide, and meeting world leaders, before returning to the Midwest in 2015 as the commander for the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway. In introducing the 1984 biology graduate at Saturday morning’s BGSU commencement ceremonies, Provost Rodney Rogers noted she was the first woman to rise from the junior enlisted ranks to become a flag officer. Ryan offered the graduates of the College of Arts and Sciences “four observations that led to my success and could lead to yours.” “Remember BGSU,” she said. The “B” stands for beacon, she said. “Be a beacon for others,” Ryan said. “So concentrate your talent to a single beam of light and then share it with the world.” That means being a mentor. And for those who wonder what a new college graduate has to offer, she said: “I can tell you there many people who want to be in your shoes and don’t know the path to get to a commencement.” BGSU graduates can help light their paths. Ryan said they must also have gratitude. Just as a lighthouse’s beacon is supporting by brick and limestone, their success is built on the work of countless others. That includes family and friends. It also includes those whose daily work doesn’t get much recognition – those who work in landscaping, the bookstore, the library, residence halls, food service, and the…


BGSU trustees okay money & authority for university to buy adjacent properties

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees Friday again gave approval and money to the administration to purchase adjacent properties as they come on the market. That can be done if the university needs the land for development or to improve the aesthetics around the campus. Sheri Stoll, vice president for finance, said during the morning informational meeting that the limited authority to purchase real estate dates back to 2003. The authority is renewed every two years. The authorization is for up to $1 million. The most recent purchases were two houses on the corner of East Wooster and College and two houses on Troupe Street. The houses on Troupe Street have been turned into places where forensic science students can student crime scene procedures. Stoll said sometimes when a house “is deemed not in horrible condition,” it can renovated and used as temporary housing for faculty or staff. Only one house is now being so used. Otherwise as is the case of the two houses on East Wooster they are torn down. She said will plant grass and leave the lots as green space “until such time we have some use for that.” In the past two years the university has spent $631,000 using the limited authority, she said. Board Chair David Levey, in his last meeting as a trustee, encouraged Stoll to buy up whatever became available. While the university’s side of East Wooster has really been cleaned up, nothing has been done across the street. That makes a poor first impression. Levey, a housing developer, said he was struck by the contrast when he first returned to campus nine years ago. Pointing to a campus map, he encouraged the board to see to it that “when kids come back to campus 40 years from now that this looks like part of the university. When property comes available buy it. That really should become an extension of campus.” That will take, he said, a couple decades to accomplish. Megan Newlove, of Bowling Green, was elected the chair at the meeting. During the afternoon business session as part of his farewell, he said he was disappointed he wouldn’t be on board when the Harshman Quadrangle comes down. A few weeks ago he told Faculty Senate that when he returned to campus and saw it, he wondered why it was still there, and…


Recreation center gets funky & functional glass mosaic

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Artist Gail Christofferson is proud of her most recent work. While being interviewed near the track on the second floor of the Bowling Green Recreation Center, she asks those passing by what they think of the new glass mosaic above the lobby. The walkers approve. Christofferson shares that sense of pride with hundreds of others. Almost 800 Bowling Green residents, kids through seniors, had a hand in creating those 40 glass quilt squares. They helped sort and trim the bits of glass and place them within the designs. Those designs were created not just by Christofferson, but also by Bowling Green High art students, the Conneaut Art Club and members of the Black Swamp Quilters Guild. On Tuesday, May 9, at 4 p.m. a celebration of the installation will be held. Those “funky quilt squares” were appropriate for the project, Christofferson said. “A quilt was made by the community. It was an heirloom that was valued. I like that concept.” And like a quilt, the mosaic is functional art. Parks and Recreation Director Kristen Otley approached Christofferson about creating the mosaic to help moderate the sunlight that would pour into the lobby at certain times of the day during mid-summer. Those rays left those working at the front desk literally blinded by the light. The “funky quilt” idea worked because the artist wasn’t sure how many mosaic panels she’d have to work it. Besides forming the artistic vision, she had to martial the community forces to work on it. Christofferson said she could have done the work herself, but having the community involved was an important part of the project. So crafting work gave way to filling out paperwork and making telephone calls. She was glad to have the help of the Kiwanis’ college affiliate help with grouting the 40 panels. “If I had to do it all myself, my hands would have fallen off,” she said. In the past year, she has brought together folks at Wood Lane, Montessori School of Bowling Green, Conneaut Elementary, the Wood County Educational Service Center, Kiwanis, Behavioral Connections, and Brookdale Bowling Green. She would spend an entire day working in a school. She held three open sessions at the Art in the Park, and two movie nights. All intended to get as many hands involved in the project as possible. In mid-April with the 20-inch-by-20-inch panels completed,…


BGSU to test warning sirens, May 9

BGSU will perform outdoor warning siren testing from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m. Tuesday, May 9. Periodic testing will consist of warning tones and voice commands at four to six locations across campus. Each test will last for 10 to 15 minutes. These sirens typically activate if Wood County goes under a Tornado Warning, for the regular monthly test or for the statewide tornado drill normally held every March. The May 9 test will be rescheduled if there is a chance of severe weather.


BGSU to award 2,328 degrees in graduation ceremonies

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Degree candidates at Bowling Green State University’s commencement ceremonies Friday (May 5) and Saturday (May 6) will hear from alumni who have gone on to distinguished careers in academia, the Coast Guard and the financial services industry. Of the total 2,328 degrees to be awarded this weekend, 664 are with honors. The Graduate College will award 436 degrees, including 404 candidates for master’s degrees and 32 for doctorates. Those graduating include 102 international students from 30 countries. The Bowling Green campus will hold three ceremonies, all in the Stroh Center. The 7 p.m. Friday event will comprise the Graduate College and the colleges of Health and Human Services, Musical Arts and Technology, Architecture and Applied Engineering. Giving the commencement address will be Anthony Rucci, who received a bachelor’s degree in psychology and master’s and doctoral degrees in industrial/organizational psychology from BGSU. Rucci is now a clinical professor of management in the Fisher School of Business at the Ohio State University and a Distinguished Teaching Professor. The 9 a.m. Saturday commencement for the College of Arts and Sciences will feature an address by Rear Admiral June Ryan, who earned a Bachelor of Science in biology in 1985. Ryan serves as the Ninth Coast Guard district commander, a position she assumed in June 2015. She is the senior Coast Guard commander for the Great Lakes and Saint Lawrence Seaway. The colleges of Business Administration and Education and Human Development will hold commencement at 2 p.m. Saturday. Susan Mucciarone, who earned a Bachelor of Science in business administration in 1979, will give the commencement address. She is the managing director of Private Client Relationship Management at The Glenmede Trust Co. and a member of the Glenmede Management Committee. In this role, she leads private client investment and wealth advisory for individuals and families throughout the country. BGSU Firelands’ commencement ceremony will begin at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. William McDonald, executive dean of regional campuses at Ohio State, will address the candidates. He received three degrees from BGSU: a bachelor’s in interpersonal and public communication and master’s and doctoral degrees in sociology. Of the total 2,328 degrees to be awarded this weekend, 664 are with honors. The Graduate College will award 436 degrees, including 404 candidates for master’s degrees and 32 for doctorates. Those graduating include 102 international students from 30 countries. With this commencement, BGSU presents three…


Safe Communities reviews five fatal crashes

Wood County Safe Communities held their quarterly Fatal Data Review on Tuesday, April 4. Five crashes were reviewed from the first quarter of 2017. The crashes reviewed were:  Rte 6 at Wapakoneta Rd.  2111 E. Wooster St. in Bowling Green  I-280 at Mile Post 1  Curtice and Wheeling in Northwood  I-75 at Mile Post 170 The countermeasures established as a result of these crashes are as follows:  Always wear your seatbelt  Do not drive at an excessive speed  Always be attentive when driving  Always obey all traffic control devices  Do not drive impaired  Always secure children properly in approved Child Restraints For more information, please contact Lt. Angel Burgos, Ohio State Highway Patrol, at 419-352-2481


Portraits in friendships between BGSU student photographers & Wood Lane individuals exhibited at Toledo Museum

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News To find the Wood Lane photo exhibition at the Toledo Museum of Art, walk toward Matisse’s “Apollo” on the ground floor, then take a left. Just down the hall from that masterpiece, images of people served by Wood Lane line the walls of the Community Gallery. Most of the photos were taken by students in Lynn Whitney’s Community Projects class at Bowling Green State University. Some were taken by the Wood Lane individuals themselves. The exhibit, “Speaking of,” is the culmination of semester long project through which a dozen BGSU student photographers were teamed up with Wood Lane individuals. This is the project’s fifth year. At the opening, Whitney said this was “a project that seeks to bring a voice and alternative vision to a community of especially wonderful people.” In the beginning the Wood Lane individuals were the subjects. The photographers worked with them to depict their lives. This year, though, they were also given cameras and with the guidance of their student partners also made photographs. They went out bowling, shopping, for ice cream, and talked, said Lisa Kaplan, a BGSU graduate and a professor at Adrian College who has watched the project develop. And they came to the museum both for a visual literacy workshop and to view the Kehinde Wiley exhibit. This kind of partnership is especially needed now, Kaplan said. “We face a nation that’s increasingly suffering in many ways from a terrible lack of empathy. The struggle continues to get to a place where people with disabilities are fully integrated members of society who have full access to jobs, family, and education. … The public presentation of these pictures is a challenge to a dominant, often dehumanizing, narrative of people with disabilities.” Museum Director Brian Kennedy said the project connects with the museum’ focus on visual literacy. “We teach people how to see, to make them understand what they see. When you understand what you see, you empathize; you try to think what the other person is feeling.” Those connections are more personal between the partners in pictures. “I really felt like it was going to be a new experience,” said Kristy Cartmell of her decision to enroll in the class. “It would take me out of my comfort zone and make a connection with somebody. Photography is all about the connection.” She was partnered with Michael. He…


School tax & Rowland win big in primary

The Bowling Green School District income tax renewal has passed overwhelmingly. With 100 percent of the vote in, the income tax is ahead 75 percent (1,939 votes) to 25 percent (647). Sandy Rowland easily outpaced a four-candidate field for two Democratic spots for council at large on the November ballot. Her 1001 votes were more than twice her nearest competitor. Holly Cipriani held a slim 11-vote lead over third place candidate Mark Hollenbaugh, 423-411. Robert Piasecki with 266 votes came in fourth. A first-ever Green Party primary for the council at large drew 123 voters. Beverly Ann Elwazani was the top Green votegetter with 41 votes. Carolyn S. Kawecka with 32 and Helen Kay Dukes with 30 were neck and neck for the second Green line. Rosamond L. McCallis received 20 votes.


Faculty members urge BGSU to be a leader in addressing sexual violence

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Sandra Faulkner wants Bowling Green State University to be the leader in combating sexual assault on campus. The director of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies hopes that the recent protests over the way BGSU handles sexual assault will lead to innovation, not duplication of other universities’ “best practices.” “No institution in higher education handles sexual violence well,” she said. Faulkner and her colleague Sarah Rainey, an associate professor in the School of Cultural and Critical Studies, met with Dean of Students Jodi Webb Friday in the wake of a protest that drew about 200 students. In their meeting with Webb, Faulkner and Rainey brought with them a list of actions, drafted by members of the Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies faculty, that BGSU could take immediately to start addressing the problem. On Monday President Mary Ellen Mazey announced the formation of Task Force on Sexual Assault. Rainey is one of 17 members appointed to the task force. The task force includes faculty, staff, students, the student member of the Board of Trustees, and a representative from The Cocoon. (http://bgindependentmedia.org/mazey-to-launch-task-force-on-sexual-assault/) According to President Mary Ellen Mazey’s letter announcing its creation, the task force’s charge is: “to review our policies and procedures for Title IX and sexual assault, benchmark our efforts against best practices across the country, and provide recommendations to improve the campus culture and our policies. In addition, the task force will examine our services for supporting sexual assault victims and evaluate our awareness and prevention efforts.” Both Faulkner and Rainey were encouraged by the composition of the task force. Faulkner is concerned about the word “benchmark.” “We shouldn’t be benchmarking with anyone,” she said. “We should innovate. We should do more.” Other institutions should be looking to BGSU as the model. While the Task Force is expected to gather before summer, Rainey said she expects the work to start in earnest in August when the fall semester begins. It would be hard to meet throughout the summer given faculty and students are not always on campus. They indicated a report would be made by the end of the year. Before then they and their colleagues and students would like certain steps to be taken. The university must do a better job of educating students about the issue. That would include information about prevention as well as what options are available to victims. All…


Nathan Eberly files for at-large city council as independent

Submitted by NATHAN EBERLY At the deadline for Independent candidates for City Council At-Large, Nathan Eberly has submitted petitions to the Board of Elections for verification in hoeps of being certified to appear on the November 2017 ballot. The November General Election is expected to have at  least six candidates with Eberly joining the race in official status, pending verification and certification by the Board of Elections. Nathan Eberly is a Financial Representative with Modern Woodmen of America here in Bowling Green. Eberly is a volunteer for several organizations in town including the Brown Bag Food Project, the Wood County Humane Society, Wood Lane Levy Committee, and others. He is a member of the Exchange Club of Bowling Green and has been an active volunteer for a range of projects. Further, Eberly is very involved and active in the Chamber of Commerce, assisting the Business Council, Governmental Affairs Committee, and ACT BG. In December 2016 Eberly, seeing a need for an organization focused on young professionals including BGSU graduates and students, formed the Bowling Green Young Professionals Association. The next step in the process is waiting for the certification of the petitions and the official adding of Eberly as an Independent candidate on the November General Election ballot. This will come after the Primary Election for tomorrow, May 2, and along side the election certification process for the election results. Eberly is holding a Coffee with the Candidate chat May 12 between 7:30m and 9:30 a.m. at Biggby Coffee in Bowling Green. This will be the fifth installment of the Coffee with the Candidate events that Eberly has held since his announcement of desire to run for Council in December 2016.