Articles by David Dupont

Chillabration shows the Bowling Green way to celebrate winter

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green celebrated winter the way it loves—with activities and beer on ice, song, food and child’s play, all in temperatures that weren’t all that winter-like. BG Winterfest Chillabration ran from Friday through Sunday packed with activities in the park, community center, the ice arena and downtown. The event was a collaborative effort of the Bowling Green Convention and Visitors Bureau, the City Parks and Recreation Department, Wood County District Public Library. and the BGSU ice arena, which was celebrating the 50th anniversary of the ice arena. Here’s just a sampling of the fun.            


WBGU-TV to stay put, more or less, as BGSU comes away from spectrum auction empty-handed

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Dave Kielmeyer first discussed the possibility of Bowling Green State University taking part in the Federal Communications Commission’s incentive auction, he said that WBGU-TV’s spectrum could fetch millions, or nothing, “nada.” Now some 20 months later, after a vigorous public discussion period, and more than a year-long auction process, “nada” it is. The university announced Friday that it had withdrawn from the auction about a month ago, and the station will continue to broadcast in the UHF spectrum. The only change for WBGU-TV will be a move a few spots down on the dial from 27 to 22. That’s part of the repacking process whereby TV stations are packed into one part of the spectrum, and wireless providers into the newly acquired space. But that won’t happen for at least another 18 months or so. Kielmeyer said the station’s engineering staff is looking at the details of making the change. “I don’t think it’ll be terribly difficult.” All the costs of moving will be picked up by the FCC. The parties could not comment while the auction was going on, and only now has the FCC allowed stations to announce the outcome. The FCC had staged the auction to free up spectrum for use by the growing wireless sector. Kielmeyer, who as chief marketing and communications officer oversees the station, said that the university decided that the money being offered was not enough to continue in the process. The university, he said, had hoped to generate some revenue that could have been used for student scholarships. The university trustees had said that the station would continue to operate, but allowed the administration to participate to see if it could surrender its UHF spectrum, which is more desirable, and move to VHF, or possibly partner with another station, and share spectrum. In a statement released by the university, President Mary Ellen Mazey said: “As we indicated before the start of the auction, WBGU-TV remains an integral part of the University’s core mission, a valued asset in the community, and an important provider of experiential learning for our academic programs. We look forward to continuing that mission.” The university conducted four public meetings in the summer of 2015. Those hearings drew hundreds, almost unanimous in supporting keeping the station on…


Winterfest Chillabration tent puts a song in the heart of downtown BG

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Winterfest in Downtown Bowling Green will now offer visitors a place to chill out on Saturday. Wendy Chambers, executive director of the Bowling Green Convention and Visitors Bureau, said a people have suggested the annual celebration needed more of a downtown presence. So this year, the Huntington Bank parking lot at the southeast corner of South Main and Clough streets will be turned into an ice garden and tented music venue. Winterfest gets underway tonight (Friday, Feb 10 with events at the Community Center and the Slater Ice Arena on the Bowling Green State University campus. The university is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the arena. From noon to 4 p.m. on Saturday the Chillabration Tent will offer hot chocolate, coffee and doughnuts, and will be the site of ice carving demonstrations. Three ice sculptures, each inspired by Disney animated movies, will be carved. Karaoke will be set up to allow people to sing along to their favorite tunes from the movies “Frozen,” “Aladdin” and “Little Mermaid.” Other ice sculptures sponsored by local businesses and organizations will be on display in the parking lot. Though the temperature is expected to reach to 50 degrees, Chambers said, she’s been assured that the ice sculptures can go on as scheduled. “We kind of go with the flow,” she said. “Mother Nature’s going to do what Mother Nature’s going to do.” Also during the day Saturday there will be carriage rides starting from the courtyard at the Four Corners Center and a high school art show inside the building. Shops, she said, will be offering special “snowtastic” sales as well. From 4 to 11 p.m. Saturday beer and wine will be available for purchase in the Chillabration tent. The beverage tent is modeled after the beer garden at the Black Swamp Arts Festival, Chambers said. The country rock band Corduroy Road, featuring Josh Denning and Niki Carpenter, two veterans of the Bowling Green music scene, will be the headliner. The band will perform at 7:15 p.m. Chambers reached out to Tim Concannon, who runs the Hump Day Revue at Stones Throw, to fill out the stage schedule. Concannon also books the acts for the farmers market, and is in his second year co-chairing with Cole Christensen the Performing Arts Committee for the…


Pianist Chu-Fang Huang has musical stories to tell

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When concert pianist Chu-Fang Huang listens to the finalists in the David Dubois Piano Festival and Competition Sunday morning, she wants the young musicians to tell her a story. “More important than making your fingers move faster or more brilliantly, you need understand what the composer has to say. Otherwise playing the piano would be like being a blacksmith, just hammering.” This epiphany ignited her passion for music. “I realized every piece of music is like a piece of literature. Every piece of music is like something by Shakespeare and Tolstoy. It’s just written in different language.” She arrived at this understanding when she was 17, and a student at the Curtis Institute. She’d been playing for 10 years at that point easily winning many competitions. But her technical mastery driven by a strong competitive streak was not enough. “If you want to crack the code, send the right kind of message, the right kind of emotions to your listener you must understand through the notes, the chords, the melody, what the composer is trying to say.” “I realized what a great world I’d gotten into, the great emotions and how affecting and touching those things can be,” Huang said in a recent telephone interview. All this will come to the fore when she performs in recital Saturday at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall. Tickets are $7 in advance at: https://itkt.choicecrm.net/templates/BGSU/index.php or by calling 419-372-8171. Her program will conclude with Maurice Ravel’s La Valse, a piece she performed in 2005 as winner of International Piano Competition and finalist in the Cliburn International Piano Competition. In the flamboyant waltz, originally written for orchestra, Ravel depicts the European aristocracy on the brink of World War I who “didn’t want to face the fact that something was coming. They wanted to dwell in their luxurious lives while shooting was already happening outside their window. It’s a huge sarcasm Ravel pulls off.” The Chopin sonata and ballade that she will play both speak to the composer’s love of his native Poland. The ballade is based on a Polish poem and his Second Sonata was written as Warsaw was falling to the Russian czar. The latter piece includes the famous funeral march. Huang will also perform two pieces by Haydn, a composer she…


BGSU Arts Events through Feb. 21

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Feb. 9—The Elsewhere Season begins with “The Winter Barrel,” written and directed by film faculty member Dr. Eileen Cherry-Chandler. The staged reading will begin at 8 p.m. in the Marjorie Conrad M.D. Choral Room, located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Feb. 11—The David D. Dubois Piano Festival and Competition features guest artist Chu-Fang Huang. Winner of a 2011 Avery Fisher Career Grant, Huang debuted as a finalist in the 2005 Van Cliburn Piano Competition and as First Prize Winner of the Cleveland Piano Competition that same year. In 2006, she won a place on the Young Concert Artist roster. Her performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets are $7 call 419-372-8171  or online at http://www.bgsu.edu/the-arts.html. Feb. 12—The David D. Dubois Piano Festival and Competition will start at 9 a.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. The annual event supports student pianists by providing scholarships for high school students to attend BGSU, encouraging undergraduate students to develop innovative programming ideas for outreach projects and supporting current piano students to participate in music festivals around the world. Free Feb. 14—Music at the Manor House features BGSU violin students. The performance will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Manor House in Wildwood Metropark, 5100 W. Central Ave., in Toledo. Free Feb. 14—Tuesdays at the Gish continue with the 1968 film “Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One,” directed by William Greaves. This film on the making of a film involves three camera crews capturing the process and personalities (director, actors, crew, bystanders) involved. Led by visionary auteur William Greaves, the collective project also depends on his multi-racial crew, who stage an on-set rebellion that becomes the film’s drama and platform for sociopolitical critique and revolutionary philosophy. Filmed in Central Park, the film is a vivid document of this historical period and moment in American independent cinema. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Feb. 16—The Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series features graduate students Bridget Adams and Benji Katz. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Feb. 16-25 — “The Penelopiad” will be presented  at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre at the Wolfe Center…


Optimal Aging Institute offers programs on pet therapy, care for dementia patients, ukulele & more

From BGSU OPTIMAL AGING INSTITUTE The Optimal Aging Institute at Bowling Green State University invites older adults to embrace wellness with a full list of programs, ranging from pet therapy to osteoporosis prevention to photography made during the Great Depression. All programs are free but registration is encouraged at www.bgsu.edu/oai or by calling (419) 372-8244. The first two programs will be held at the Bowling Green State University Student Recreation Center, with free, convenient parking in Lot X off of Mercer Road, right next to the recreation center, for registrants. “Pet Therapy: Sharing the Joy” (Feb. 23 at 10:30 a.m.) explores the history of pet therapy and its benefits to older adults, and offers activities with pet therapy animals. The presenters are Cynthia Spitler, Ph.D., who is a licensed nursing home administrator and teaches in BGSU’s Gerontology Program, and Christopher Dunn, Ph.D., BGSU associate professor of criminal justice, who visits facilities with pet therapy animals and whose students conduct field research on pet therapy as part of a research methods class. “Osteoporosis: Prevention through Exercise” (March 2, 1 p.m) will provide exercises and tips to strengthen bones and improve balance, coordination and flexibility, as well as give information on the disease. Its presenter, Robyn Miller, Ed.S., is an instructor in BGSU’s School of Human Movement, Sport & Leisure Studies, and is an ACSM-certified personal trainer. A two-session “Ukulele for Beginners” class, which is co-sponsored by Bowling Green Parks and Recreation, will take place on March 22 and 29 from 10:30 a.m. until noon at the Simpson Garden Community Center at 1291 Conneaut Ave. If you have ever wanted to learn to play a musical instrument, register for these two sessions to learn how to strum, play a few chords, sing familiar songs and learn some new ones, all in a fun and relaxing environment. There is no experience necessary and instruments will be provided. The presenter, Lisa Gruenhagen, Ph.D., is an associate professor of music education at BGSU; while at the Eastman School of Music, she became involved with the New Horizons music program, which provides entry points to music making for “chronologically gifted” adults ages 50 and older. “Images of the Great Depression in America,” on April 6 at 10 a.m. in the Wood County District Public Library, will explore images made in the 1930s, including…


Faculty senate hears about parking, approves graduate program & honorary degree

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Faculty Senate at Bowling Green State University was not stuck in park when it met Tuesday. Its agenda was jammed, but it kept moving, at least with as much speed as it could manage with presentations on faculty files related to merit and promotion, charter revisions, and a change in who is qualified to teach and supervise graduate students. Then there was the discussion of parking. Aaron Kane, manager of Parking Services, explained the new system his office will be initiating. Now parking enforcement officers will cruise lots and scan license plate numbers to determine if cars are parked where they should be. The system, he said, has many advantages. It should save time and energy. “Improved productivity is going to be a major benefit,” he said. People will no longer have to stand in line to get their hanging passes. The registration process will be done all online. Each faculty member will be able to register two cars. Students will be able to register one car. People with loaners or rental cars will be able to go online and change the registration so that car will be covered instead of one of the two originally registered. When prospective students and their families come to campus they will be able to register their vehicles ahead of time. At the ice arena, Kane said, people coming for open skate, now have to park, run inside, get a tag, and return to the vehicle to put it in. Now they’ll just give their license plate number at the desk. The system will allow parking services to gather data on which lot are filling up, with the possibility of an app that will tell commuting students which lots have spaces and which are full. The system Kane said may be extended to pay lots, allowing visitors to pay for parking without going to the kiosk. The system, he said, has worked well at Ohio State and Cleveland State. New graduate degree The senate also approved a new Master of Arts in European Studies. The interdisciplinary major would prepare students for careers in business, journalism, government, research and education. The program builds on the university’s strengths including established study abroad programs. The major, said Edgar Landgraf, a professor of German, also addresses…


Still no action in Faculty Senate on sanctuary petition

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Bowling Green State University Faculty Senate meeting Tuesday unfolded much as the January session had. Senators were greeted by a gauntlet of protestors outside McFall, and then when the senate convened the sign-carrying demonstrators lined the assembly hall quietly and listened through President Mary Ellen Mazey’s remarks. And when she addressed the issue they were concerned about, a request for a sanctuary campus, they heard the same stance. The university must adhere to the law. But the university will do everything within the parameters of the law to assist foreign students and faculty as well as students with status under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. The university has 11 DACA students and 21 with visas or green cards from the seven countries covered by the travel ban. Mazey has publicly supported proposed federal legislation, the BRIDGE Act that would extent DACA status to people who were brought to the country illegally as children. On Tuesday, Mazey announced she joined 600 other higher education leaders in signing a letter opposing the travel ban issued by the administration. While acknowledging the need to “safeguard” the country, the letter states the signatories also recognize “the need for the United States to remain the destination of choice for the world’s best and brightest students, faculty, and scholars.” This openness promotes American values abroad as well as promoting scientific and technological advances, the letter states. When asked, Mazey would not speculate on what action the university would take if these legislative and lobbying efforts failed. Professor Francisco Cabanillas then asked if those efforts fail “would we have to say yes in our town” to immigration officials checking the status of students and faculty, referencing the Not In Our Town anti-bias program that Mazey help found. Mazey reiterated that all students and faculty are here legally, so she doesn’t see why immigration officials would come to BGSU. “We have confidence in the law.” But for those pushing for sanctuary status that is not enough. Outside before the meeting, Ethnic Studies professor Michaela Walsh, who initiated the sanctuary campus petition, said she hoped that bringing the issue up before Faculty Senate “would be the first step toward creating an open dialogue” after the issue failed to generate discussion at the previous senate meeting. Luis…


Teen pianists selected to compete in Dubois Festival at BGSU (Update)

The David D. Dubois Piano Festival and Competition has selected 28 young pianists as semifinalists to compete Saturday, Feb. 11, with finals Sunday, Feb. 12 at Bowling Green State University’s Moore Musical Arts Center. All events will take place in Bryan Recital Hall. The pianists will compete for a top prize of $3,000, with $2,000 for second and $1,000 for first. The festival’s guest artist will be pianist Chu-Fang Huang. Huang will present a master class Friday from 2:30–4:30 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall and she will perform a solo recital Saturday at 8 p.m.  Contact 419-372-8171,  or online at http://www.bgsu.edu/the-arts.html for tickets. She will also judge the finals on Sunday. The teenage pianists come from 10 states and Ontario. The semifinalists were selected based on a video recording submitted to the festival. The pianists prepare a program of 20 to 30 minutes in length that includes selections from at least three of four style periods – Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Contemporary. One movement from a Classical sonata is required. All works must be memorized with the exception of those written after 1945. The semifinals will be held Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center on campus. Those selected as finalists will perform Sunday beginning at 8:30 a.m. Recipient of a 2011 Avery Fisher Career Grant, Huang burst onto the music scene as a finalist in the 2005 Van Cliburn Piano Competition, and as First Prize Winner of the Cleveland Piano Competition that same year.  In 2006, she won First Prize in the Young Concert Artists International Auditions and made critically acclaimed debuts at Carnegie’s Zankel Hall and at the Kennedy Center in the Young Concert Artists Series. Huang has performed in Canada on the Vancouver Recital Society Series, in Australia with the Sydney Symphony Orchestra and the Australian Chamber Orchestra, in China with the Sichuan Symphony Orchestra and the China, Shenzhen, and Liaoning Philharmonic Orchestras, at the famed Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, the Ruhr Piano Festival in Germany, the Mustafa Kemal Center in Istanbul, and at the Musée du Louvre in Paris. After early studies at the Shenyang Music Conservatory, Huang continued her studies at the Idyllwild Arts Academy in California, where she studied with Laura Melton, now on the BGSU music faculty.  Subsequently, she earned her Bachelor’s degree…


Greek accordion master squeezing his instrument into contemporary music

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Panagiotis Andreoglou is a missionary proselytizing about the virtues of accordion. The Greek musician has traveled to Bowling Green intent on introducing composers and music lovers here to his instrument, and to understanding through experience that it’s more than a vehicle for polka, zydeco or tango. Not, that there’s anything wrong with those venerable styles. They are part of his instrument’s DNA. Still wielding a button accordion, a further development from the more familiar piano accordion, he’s intent on showing that the instrument he begged to play when he was a child has a place in contemporary music. Andreoglou will make his case Tuesday at 8 p.m. in a guest artist recital in Bryan Recital Hall in Bowling Green State University. His program showcases his instrument both as a haunting solo voice and in conjunction with pre-recorded electronics. He will also perform March 2 at 8 p.m. with the New Music Ensemble. Andreoglou is in the early stages of a semester long residency at BGSU made possible by Fulbright Artist Scholarship. He decided to take up residency after meeting BGSU composition professor Elainie Lillios at a music festival in Thessaloniki in his native Greece.  They were intrigued by each other’s music. BGSU’s strong reputation as a center of contemporary music was an attraction. Andreoglou is particularly interested in electro-acoustic music, Lillios’ specialty, where acoustic and electronic sounds merge. The accordionist believes the particular timbre of his instrument lends itself particularly well to the genre, and he wants to encourage composers to explore those possibilities. “Composers are interested generally in new sounds since this is a new instrument with a lot of possibilities they can use.” Andreoglou has been exploring the sound of the accordion since he was 7. His father had a small piano accordion, and could play three songs, Andreoglou remembers.  “I was fascinated,” he said. “I wanted to learn. I insisted.” So his parents sent him to the local music school. A few years later he began piano lessons as well and through his teenage years he played and studied both instruments. When he went to university he focused on piano. He majored in musicology with studies in ethnomusicology and continued his piano at the local music school. It was only after he graduated that the accordion…


St. Baldrick’s clip jobs raise money for childhood cancer research

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Amid smiles and tears, songs and cheers, dozens of good-hearted folks sacrificed their hair Sunday in solidarity with the thousands of young cancer patients who have no choice about going bald. Students and others were lined up Sunday for the fifth St. Baldrick’s Foundation fundraiser at Bowling Green State University. Cassie Mere, the coordinator of the fundraiser, said when she presented herself as a candidate to lead the event which is sponsored by National Residence Hall Honorary along with the Office of Residence Life, she stated she would not have her head shaved. But Sunday morning, caught up in the spirit, she was sporting a new clean clipped hairdo. The more she learned about the cause the more she wanted to participate. The event will top $100,000 raised by the BGSU / St. Baldrick’s Day event since it was started to raise money to support the fight against childhood cancer.  The goal for Sunday was $22,000, and as of Monday morning it had collected $16,161 with donations still coming in. In all 89 heads were shaved. Participants were mainly students, but others, including Mere’s grandfather and her boyfriend’s little brother, also got shaved. As Caitlyn VanDyke’s auburn tresses fell from her head, she held of a lock of her hair and contemplated it. Within minutes she was bald, smiling at the strange sensation of rubbing her exposed scalp. She was inspired by a high school friend “who lost the battle to cancer.” Leading up to the event she’s been talking up St. Baldrick’s. She secured $550 in pledges. VanDyke isn’t concerned about the questions her new look will prompt. “I’m looking forward to it,” she said. “I’m excited. I’m proud. It’s not a big deal to me. It’s just hair. It will grow back.” Some women surrendered their long cultivated ponytails. Mere said that the event works with Pantene Beautiful Lengths, which uses hair to make wigs for cancer patients. Sunday’s event yielded 40 ponytails for donation. Zach Beach was participating for his third year. He stops getting a haircut for several months before to achieve the maximum effect. He’s graduating this year, but still plans to search out a St. Baldrick’s event wherever he ends up. Beach remembers fielding questions from his family when he first got his…


Bruce Moss named OMEA Outstanding Educator

By Marie Dunn-Harris ’95 From BGSU MARKETING &COMMUNICATIONS Ask any BGSU music student, past or present, who Dr. Bruce Moss is and chances are you will hear nothing but praise and admiration. Moss, a professor and the director of band activities for 23 years in Bowling Green State University’s College of Musical Arts, was named Ohio Music Education Association’s (OMEA) 2017 Most Outstanding Educator of the Year. The award recognizes and honors an OMEA member each year for his or her outstanding service, dedication and overall contribution to music education. The finalists need at least six nomination letters to be considered for the honor, and Dr. Moss had 65. “I was surprised and humbled beyond words when seeing the long list of names of former students and peers from all over the country who wrote letters on my behalf,” Moss said. The list of people who nominated Moss is impressive. Some are former colleagues, but many are students who have gone on to pursue successful music careers. One of them is U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Ryan Nowlin, assistant director of “The President’s Own” U.S. Marine Band. Nowlin studied with Moss for his undergraduate and graduate degrees. In his letter, Nowlin said, “Dr. Moss’s selfless commitment to students, stalwart advocacy for music education, personal and professional integrity, genuine care and concern for student growth, development and success, and his high level of musicianship make him a role model, mentor and tireless devotee to all fortunate enough to study under his baton.” Another world-class musician and nominator is John Hagstrom, a trumpet student of Moss when he taught public school. He now performs in the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. “As I look back at the most important influences on my early development it is clear to me that Bruce Moss was crucially important for my tenacity and honest improvement despite many obstacles,” Hagstrom said. “His focus on quality and finding solutions models a strategic mind-set that I have emulated along with many of his other successful students. “That Bruce Moss is an outstanding music educator is well documented by the outstanding results he has achieved with several generations of students, and this is because he himself personifies the courage and commitment of a mature and educated person. I am only one of so many students who have been…


Scientists worried about Trump’s impact on science

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Trump Administration antipathy toward the Environmental Protection Agency has scientists at Bowling Green State University worried. Of particular concern to the region is how changes at the EPA could affect efforts to protect and restore the Great Lakes. Trump views environmental protection regulations as a hindrance to economic growth and has appointed Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, who has sued the EPA on numerous occasions, to head the agency. “There’s a lot of uncertainty and a lot of worry,” said George Bullerjahn, a professor of research excellence in biological science. Bullerjahn has been heavily involved in studying the cyanotoxins in Lake Erie that closed down the Toledo water supply in 2014. He and colleague Robert Michael McKay worked with Republican U.S. Rep. Bob Latta’s staff to draft the Drinking Water Protection Act. The legislation was the rare law that made it through a Congress deeply divided along partisan lines. Bullerjahn said that he felt that Latta was “swimming upstream” in backing the legislation when many of those in the conservative legislator’s fellow Republicans wanted to see the EPA abolished. Much of his funding comes from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Science Foundation. Sientists there are also nervous. But, Bullerjahn said, “EPA is the whipping boy.” McKay shares Bullerjahn’s concern. “Our new administration is very unpredictable.” That was evident when just after the Inauguration the administration ordered a freeze on all grants and contracts. The Washington Post reports that has been lifted, but uncertainty remains on other fronts. In an email, McKay wrote: “Also unclear how the actions of the administration will impact the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative which is administered by EPA. Notably, in December, Congress authorized $300 million to carry through 2021 and apparently language in the Bill directs those funds to be spent on the Great Lakes, so perhaps that offers some protections. However, there are other activities/initiatives directed by federal EPA that could impact our ability to monitor the health of the lakes. “Potentially affecting BGSU scientists would be modifications to the seasonal monitoring surveys conducted by EPA (to be clear, I have not heard on any negative actions that would affect this program – yet). “Each spring and summer, a research vessel contracted by EPA conducts water quality monitoring surveys…


Peace Lutheran powers Christian mission with light from the sun

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Peace Lutheran demonstrates its faith by the cross that rises high atop its steeple. The solar panels that were installed recently are also a demonstration of the congregation’s faith. “Here’s a faith expression that God is resourceful and generous,” said Pastor Deb Conklin. The solar panels fit in its Creation Care ministry. The solar panels were paid for by a behest from long-time neighbors Leonard and Margaret David. On Sunday, Feb. 5, at 10:30 a.m. the church will dedicate and give thanks for the solar panels and donation as part of its 10:30 a.m. worship experience. The donation was a surprise, Conklin said. The Davises were not members of a congregation, though Mrs. Davis did attend some of the church’s many community functions. Conklin had already been considering what environmental action the church could do and had attended an Ohio Interfaith Power & Light conference. She’d also discussed the environment and what the church could do with local activist Neocles Leontis. Then in 2014 the lawyer handling the Davis estate stopped by the church with a $5,000 check. That was, he informed her, just the start. She wasn’t at the church, she said, when the rest came. A check for $120,000. Conklin said the church already had a vision fund in place and that’s where the money was put. Working with Harvest Energy Solutions of Jackson Michigan, the solar panels were installed this winter, and have been operating for several weeks. The contractor also provided an app that allows the congregation to monitor how much electricity is being produced. Conklin said the church expects to save 25 percent on its utility bill with the solar panels. That won’t just come off the budget’s bottom-line, she said. That money will be used for its ministry. “That’s what’s important,” she said, “not to save money for us but to do more ministry.” That means “to enhance our vision to create a Christ connection to the community.” The goal is not to proselytize “but we’re trying to connect people with the best in Christ.” Part of that is being good stewards of the earth and its resources. It’s up to people to use what God gives them and that includes science, to take care of the creation, the pastor said. Using solar power…


Ohio Population news finds poverty among the youngest children up

Using data from the 2014 American Community Survey, the current issue of Ohio Population News from Center for Family and Demographic Research at Bowling Green State University examines poverty among Ohio’s young children aged 0-4. In 2014, nearly half of Ohio’s young children were considered poor or low income, and a greater percentage of Ohio’s young children lived in poverty than in the United States as a whole. However, a greater percentage of Ohio’s young children in poverty received food stamps than the nation as a whole – an important indicator of social safety net support. The report finds 27.5 percent of children 0-4 years live in poverty, that’s an increase from 2005 when the rate was 22.6 percent. Find the Ohio Population News, http://www.bgsu.edu/content/dam/BGSU/college-of-arts-and-sciences/center-for-family-and-demographic-research/documents/OPN/Ohio-Population-News-2017-Ohios-Young-Children.pdf.