Articles by David Dupont

Jazz vet featured in downtown BG jam

Veteran jazz guitarist Eric Johnson will join the BGSU Jazz Faculty Ensemble for a show Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. at Grumpy Dave’s, upstairs at 104 S. Main St., Bowling Green. Born and raised in Pittsburgh, Johnson has played with jazz greats including Jimmy Owens, Lou Donaldson, Jack McDuff and Stanley Turrentine. Over his career he’s been based in New York and Los Angeles and recently released a CD “Supahighway.” Joining Johnson on the bandstand will be Ariel Kasler, guitar, Jeff Halsey, bass, and Olman Piedra, drums. Admission is $3.


Concerto concert puts spotlight on top BGSU musicians

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The annual Concerto Concert at the Bowling Green State University College of Musical Arts puts students in the spotlight. The soloists are students who won their chance in the spotlight in a competition in December. The conductors are students. And the Bowling Green Philharmonia is a student orchestra. Listeners should expect, however, nothing less than a top quality in the performance. Graduate student Zachary Nyce’s performance in the dress rehearsal of Witold Lutoslawski’s Concerto for Piano was proof of that. The notes had hardly stopped reverberating in Kobacker Hall when Emily Freeman Brown, director of orchestral studies at BGSU, strode onto the stage. “There are very few university situations where this could be done,” she told the assembled musicians including conductor Maria Mercedes Diaz Garcia. The concerto composed in 1988 will conclude the concert Saturday at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall on campus. Tickets are $10, $5 for students and free for BGSU music majors (and minors enrolled in MUS 99) with stickers on their IDs. Also on the program will be: • Undergraduate division winner Brianna Buck, saxophone, playing Elergie and Rondo by Karl Husa, conducted by Robert Ragoonanan. • Undergraduate division winner Yuefeng Liu, piano, playing Piano Concerto in G minor by Camille Saint-Saens, conducted by Santiago Piñeros-Serrano. • Graduate division winner, Benjamin Crook, piano, playing Piano Concerto in C minor by Ludwig von Beethoven, conducted by Evan Meccarello. Nyce was well aware of the challenge the Lutoslawski piece posed for his fellow musicians. “It’s a real challenge. I picked a very difficult piece. It’s something that needs to be heard and…


Siblings wear memorial for their father, Glenn Haught, on their skins

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News As a leathersmith, Glenn Haught knew something about needles. Haught, a longtime fixture in Bowling Green where he repaired shoes and leather items of all sorts, died Jan. 27. On Tuesday his daughter, Melissa Marshall and his son, Gerald Haught, got a taste of a different kind of needle when they visited Broad Wing Tattoo in downtown Bowling Green to get matching tattoos to honor their father’s legacy. Marshall credited her brother with the idea. He’s no stranger to the shop nor tattoo artist Jaime Mullholand. She’s worked her craft numerous times on Haught’s arms. The memorial tattoo is his seventh. He has an autobiography in ink on his arms. He already has a tattoo to honor his father, one depicting his signature hat and boots. There’s an image for each of his family members, including his mother, Linda, who assisted her husband with jobs requiring stitching on bags, purses and other items. Marshall does have one tattoo. It dates back before her marriage. Her husband, Jack, is not fond of tattoos. But, she said, he made an exception for the one that will adorn her right ankle. The image replicates the metal silhouette included on the community mural on the corner of East Poe Road and College Street. It shows Glenn Haught at work at his bench. When asked about their father, both Gerald Haught and his sister recall him as a man who worked hard at a job he loved. While known for shoe repair, his craft wasn’t limited to footwear. He repaired hockey gear, the bellows for an antique furnace in…


BGSU’s clinical psychology program top ranked

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The University’s clinical psychology Ph.D. program is among the best in the nation, according to two recent reports. On the list compiled by counselingpsychology.org, BGSU is ranked second in the nation for its success in preparing students for careers in professional counseling. The website bestcounselingdegrees.net ranks BGSU 22nd on its list of the country’s 50 best Ph.D. programs in clinical psychology for 2016. “The rankings are affirmation that we offer a top-flight program and have developed an excellent reputation,” said Dr. Michael Zickar, chair of the psychology department. “Our program has excelled in providing a balanced experience that focuses on rigorous academic research as well as excellent practical experiences and placement,” he said, adding, “Our doctoral students learn from world-class faculty and then go on to apply those experiences in mental health facilities throughout the region and the nation.” The main metric for both rankings is the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP) administered by the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards as part of the process in granting licensure. BG’s passage rate is 100 percent. The exam is “one of the best ways to determine how well students are prepared for a career in professional counseling,” according to bestcounselingdegrees.net’s website. Bestcounselingdeegrees.net’s rankings also look at the percentage of doctoral students who successfully obtain American Psychological Association-accredited internships. More than 91 percent of BGSU’s doctoral students achieved that marker. The program is one of 300 clinical psychology Ph.D. programs nationwide that is accredited by the American Psychological Association. BGSU’s program follows a scientist-practitioner model of training in which the development of…


Graduate brass quintet to perform Feb. 11

The Bowling Green State University Graduate Brass Quintet will perform Thursday, Feb. 11 at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center on campus. The quintet is made up of five graduate assistants at BGSU chosen by audition. Members are: Jon Britt and Christina Komosinski, trumpets, Luke Dickow, horn, Drew Wolgemuth, trombone, and Diego Flores, tuba. The five are all working towards master’s degrees in performance. On the program will be: “Scherzo” by John Cheetham; “Rounds and Dances” by Jan Bach; Brass Quintet No. 3 by Victor Ewald; and Brass Quintet No. 1 by Arthur Frackenpohl.


Corner Grill plans to reopen

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The owner of the Corner Grill hopes to be back serving burgers within three months. Larry Cain said Wednesday that because of water and smoke damage caused by a fire Monday morning the interior of the eatery will pretty much have to be gutted. He will try to save some signature elements such as the countertops. Still the nostalgic will be the same. Firefighters were called to the grill shortly before 8 a.m. Monday as the crew was preparing to open. Flames shot up from behind a grill as it was heating, and that fire extended into the hood, and from there into an abandoned stairwell next to the building through which the grills ventilated. That structure is owned by Jim Gavarone who operates Mr. Spots next door. The fire also temporarily closed Mr. Spots, but that restaurant is back operating. Cain said because of the damage from the fire that stairwell will now have to be removed. That’s one of the factors that will play into when the Corner Grill is back in operation. The grill itself will get a facelift, and all that work will have to be inspected and approved by the county. “That’s always the biggest thing, making sure things get codified,” Cain said. Much of the work, including getting new equipment, was already planned, but had been put off because of the vagaries of financing and operating a small business. Now that work will be done, and the new Corner Grill will be even better, he said. The owner said he was touched by the support he’s received. Howard…


Chris Buzzelli still in tune with jazz

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Chris Buzzelli didn’t change his tune when he retired. A guitar professor and director of the Bowling Green State University Jazz Vocal Group, Buzzelli retired from the university last May after teaching there since 1984. While he keeps active as a guitarist, he’s also wanted to maintain a hand in vocal music. So this summer he got together a few former students for a concert at the Hayes Home in Fremont. This Saturday, the group billed as Chris Buzzelli and Friends will perform at the Pemberville Opera House at 7:30 p.m. as part of the Live in the House series. Tickets are $12 at the door or at Beeker’s General Store in Pemberville or by calling Carol Bailey at 419-287-4848. Joining Buzzelli, who sings and plays guitar, for the show will be vocalists Samantha Ulrich, Emily Holsoe and David Breen with instrumental support from Ariel Kasler, piano, and Kevin Eikum, bass. “This is kind of my ideal group,” Buzzelli said. “I get to play, to sing, to write. It contains all my interests.” Buzzelli didn’t seek out the job of directing the jazz vocal group. Paul Hunt had done it for a number of years and when he left there were a couple short-term directors. When one of them stepped aside on short notice, Dean Richard Kennell asked Buzzelli to take over. “I said I would until he found someone else.” It became a long-term commitment. “I loved doing the group at the school and I’ve gotten into a lot of arranging and getting my arrangements published. It became an unexpected part of my…


BGSU Lively Arts Calendar, Feb. 4-17

Thursday —The Creative Writing Program’s Master of Fine Arts (MFA) readings will be presented by graduate students Eric Komosa and Tom Markham at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Thursday —BGSU Student Composers recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Thursday —The season opener for The Dorothy and Lillian Gish Film Theater and Gallery’s International Film Series features “English/Vinglish,” a 2012 feature from India, directed by Guare Shinde. A quiet housewife endures small slights from her well-educated husband and daughter because of her English skills. During a visit to New York, she enrolls in an English course and meets new people who teach her to value herself. Free Saturday —The four student winners of the annual Competitions in Music will perform with the BG Philharmonia during the 49th annual Concerto Concert. Under the direction of Dr. Emily Freeman Brown, the concert begins at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets, available at bgsu.edu/arts or by calling the ticket office at 419-372-8171, are $7 for adults and $3 for students. All tickets on the day of the performance are $10. Sunday —The BGSU School of Art presents the Annual Undergraduate Art & Design Exhibition in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries of the Fine Arts Center. The exhibition opens with a reception from 2-4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 7, and continues through Feb. 21. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays and 2 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free Sunday —The Bent Note Duo are guest artists…


Otsego graduate to receive Medal of Honor

Edward Byers, a Navy Seal who graduated from Otsego High School, will receive the nation’s highest honor later this month. The White House has announced that Byers, a senior chief special warfare operator, will receive the Medal of Honor from President Barack Obama on Feb. 29. According to the White House press release: “Senior Chief Byers will receive the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions while serving as part of a team that rescued an American civilian being held hostage in Afghanistan on December 8-9, 2012. “Senior Chief Byers will be the eleventh living service member to be awarded the Medal of Honor for actions in Afghanistan. He and his family will join the President at the White House to commemorate his example of selfless service.” Byers, 36, graduated from Otsego High in 1997. He enlisted in 1998 and trained as a corpsman. He has served in seven combat deployments earning numerous awards and decorations including five Bronze Stars and two Purple Hearts. He is continuing his education at Norwich University in Vermont where he will receive Bachelor of Science in Strategic Studies and Defense Analysis later this year.


Pemberville elevator looking for $100 donors

The Pemberville Freedom Area Historical Society is looking for a final boost to get the money it needs to finish the elevator at the Pemberville Opera House. The project started in fall has a price tag of $372,000, with about $100,000 coming from local funds. Fundraising has lagged as of early this year, and Carol Bailey, program director for the opera house, has issued a plea. The elevator effort is looking for 100 people to donate $100 each to get the project down the home stretch. In her email she states, acknowledges many people have already donated, “and I am so appreciative.” Still the need remains to come up with funds to finish the project. “Your help is truly needed in this final stretch,” she wrote. Beyond donating she’s also asking folks to help spread the word through email and social media.


Cosmic sounds of ‘Surface Image’ transform ClaZel

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Pianist Vicky Chow and composer Tristan Perich lifted the roof off the ClaZel Monday night. Together with an ensemble 40 loudspeakers emitting digital signals, they transformed the movie house turned nightclub into cosmic atmosphere, a vision of deep space. And what were those sounds coming from the loudspeakers? Cosmic peepers? Chow performed Perich’s “Surface Image” as part of the Music at the Forefront Series, sponsored by the MidAmerican Center for Contemporary Music at Bowling Green State University. The expansive piece unfolds then folds back onto itself over more than an hour. Chow articulates layers of simple figures, the musical equivalent of haiku, while buzzes, bleeps, clicks provide a counterpoint. Those lines of the counterpoint never meet. The pianist is showered by signals that demand translation; the piano expresses a longing to translate. Yet the electronics remain on another plane, emanating from deep space, heard in a darkened room. Still a mystery. The effect is at once something grand and marvelous, but also lonesome. Chow’s performance was at once virtuosic in its relentlessness. Yet remains intimate and meditative. The music flirts with monotony, and with its subdued colors actually would work well in the background, a suitable soundtrack for that state between wakefulness and sleep. Yet its profundity demands concentration as the figures shift, rise in volume, fade. A simple figure will assert itself in the middle, dropping at odd places over the steady pulse that undergirds the piece. Usually concerts at the ClaZel have a more informal air – that’s the appeal. People gather, chat at the bar, and serious listeners sit in the…


Caribbean culture focus of Africana conference at BGSU

The 18th annual Africana Studies Student Research Conference at Bowling Green State University will feature a look at Caribbean culture through film and documentary along with three panel presentations by student researchers from BGSU and other universities. The conference will take place from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Feb. 12 in 101 Olscamp Hall. Attendance is free but there is a charge for the luncheon, which must be reserved by Wednesday (Feb. 3). Tickets are $8 for BGSU students and $15 for others. Call Africana Studies at 372-7814 or email millese@bgsu.edu to purchase. Those wishing to attend the keynote lecture (but not purchasing a luncheon) are welcome. Keynote speaker Christopher Laird, an award-winning writer, film producer and director, will present “Nobody’s Diaspora? Africa in the Moving Picture Memory of the Caribbean,” during the noon luncheon. The conference will conclude with a 3 p.m. screening of his 2013 Caribbean film “No Bois Man No ’Fraid.” The first panel of the day, at 9 a.m., will focus on “Effects of Colonialism,” followed by “Contemporary Art and Identity,” at 10:30 a.m. After lunch, the final panel topic will be “Performance, Race, and Space,” at 1:30 p.m., followed by the film screening. The Trinidad and Tobago- based Laird has produced over 200 documentaries, dramas and other video productions with Banyan Ltd. over the past 40 years, garnering a score of national, regional, and international awards, including the Trinidad and Tobago National Media Awards Best Documentary for “Crossing Over” (a co-production with the National Film and Television Institute in Ghana). “Crossing Over” also was voted Best Video Documentary at the second Caribbean Film Festival in…


Fire damages Corner Grill (Updated)

BG INDEPENDENT NEWS A fire Monday morning  damaged the Corner Grill in downtown Bowling Green. No one was injured. Several hours later almost a dozen employees gathered near the police tape blocking off the entrance to the eatery and the remains of two futons to commiserate about their jobs and the Corner Grill’s place in downtown culture. The fire started before the sign signaling the start of another week of round-the-clock service had been lit. Bowling Green Fire Chief Tom Sanderson said the call came in at 7:45 a.m. from an employee reporting fire in the grill. Flames were still evident in the grill area when firefighters had arrived and the fire have moved into an abandoned stairwell connected to the eatery. That stair well has not been in use for years, and was locked. Two futon mattresses burned. Those, Sanderson said, had likely been in the stairwell for some time. The Corner Grill suffered extensive damage in the grill area. Investigation into the fire is continuing, the fire chief said. During Bowling Green City Council meeting Monday evening, council member Theresa Charters Gavarone, who owns Mr. Spots with her husband, said the restaurant suffered quite a bit of smoke and water damage. The business is expected to be open on Wednesday. “I ran up Main Street in my socks,” to let the firefighters into the restaurant, she said. Gavarone joined Mayor Dick Edwards and others in praising the work of the city’s fire and police divisions. “I can’t say enough about the professionalism and the prompt response,” she said. City Administrator Lori Tretter said the fire division already had a…


Teaching & performing linked in music of Charles Saenz

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Charles Saenz has gotten a lot of mileage out of Charles Chaynes’ Concerto for Trumpet. In 1994 when he was a junior at New Mexico State University, Saenz played the concerto in the International Trumpet Guild Solo Competition. He came away with first prize and a dream. Then 20 years later Saenz recorded the concerto. It serves as the centerpiece for his first CD, “Eloquentia,” which was released in December by Beauport Classical. The concerto, Saenz, 44, said, has been “a signature piece” that he has been studying and performing for over 20 years. “I’ll put it away for a few years and then bring it back and perform it when I’m at a different point in my playing.” He’ll find some things easier, and other aspects just as difficult. “It really challenges, in different ways, my physical abilities on the instrument,” he said. “But along with that it’s very challenging harmonically. His language is one that takes time to understand.” Saenz’ winning performance in the college competition set the trajectory for his career. He had been planning to follow his father’s footsteps and become a band director. After winning the major competition, he realized he wanted to be a performer and college professor. That meant putting “blinders on,” and concentrating on the performance, and committing to getting a graduate degree. “You start seeing little benchmarks along the way. It kind of propelled my career in a direction that led here.” Saenz has been a professor of trumpet at Bowling Green State University for 15 years. During that time he’s remained an active performer….


Spirituals celebration over lunch in BG

The City of Bowling Green Parks and Recreation Department along with the College of Musical Arts at BGSU will be is holding its second event as part of the 10th Annual Brown Bag Music Series on Friday, February 5th from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Simpson Building, 1291 Conneaut Avenue. Folks are invited to bring their lunch and enjoy a musical performance by students and faculty from the College of Musical Arts in a comfortable and warm setting. Drinks and dessert will be available for purchase. The scheduled performance in the series will be a Celebration of the African American Spiritual. For questions or more information call 419-354-6223 or visit our website at www.bgohio.org (click parks and recreation).