Arts and Entertainment

BGSU Lively Arts through Dec. 5

Nov. 29—Undergraduate and graduate piano students will perform at 7 p.m. at the Wood County District Public Library, 251 N. Main St., Bowling Green. Free Nov. 29—Percussion ensembles will perform at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 30—The Early Music Ensemble will perform at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Dec. 1—The International Film Series concludes with the 1977 film “Neokanchennaia P’esa Dlia Mekhanicheskogo Pianino (An Unfinished Piece for Mechanical Piano),” directed by Nikita Mikhalkov. From Russia’s most well-known contemporary filmmaker, an intriguing story of former lovers who meet at a pre-revolutionary country estate. Casual conversations on social issues and the music of Liszt, Rachmaninoff and Donizetti supply background to a Chekhovian treatment of returning past love. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Dec. 1—Creative writing students in the bachelor of fine arts program will present their work. The reading begins at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Dec. 1—World Percussion Night features multiple styles including performances by the Taiko, Afro-Caribbean and Gamelan ensembles. The concert begins at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171. Advance tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for students and children. All tickets the day of the concert are $10. Dec. 3—Ensembles of the BGSU College of Musical Arts will perform a Holiday Concert as part of the 12th annual ArtsX events. The performance will begin at 4 p.m. in the Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Dec. 3—The 12th annual ArtsX will take place from 5-9 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center and the Wolfe Center for the Arts, including the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries, where student and faculty artists and performers show off their talents to the community. The evening includes works from the College of Musical Arts, the…


BGSU pianists tickled to play the ivories in public library atrium

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Concerts in the Wood County Library Atrium can take patrons by surprise. They may be perusing the stacks for a novel to read, or hanging out in the Children’s Place when the strains of Bach or Beethoven come wafting through the stacks. Pianists from Bowling Green State University will present another in a series of piano recitals in the atrium Tuesday, Nov 29, at 7 p.m. The concert is presented by the piano department in the Bowling Green State University College of Musical Arts and the library and features graduate students. “It’s turned out to be a good collaboration,” said piano faculty member Thomas Rosenkranz, who is coordinating the concert. “It’s great for our students who get to play not just for their peers” but for people from the community in a situation “where people may be walking around.” “It’s not like a concert situation. That’s good. Those kinds of experiences are great.” “It’s like a promenade,” said Mikhail Johnson, a pianist who performed on an earlier library recital. As someone who aspires to a career as a touring performer and composer, it’s necessary, he said, to play for variety of audiences and in a variety of venues. “People in different places react to music differently. It’s nice to experience that first hand.” The people who show up at the library are different than those who would attend a recital at Bryan Recital Hall, he said. And the atrium has a very different sound than other concert halls. “The acoustics in the atrium are very live,” Johnson said. “As a performer that informs the way you perform. You may want to take a fast piece slower because of how bouncy the sound is. That’s very informative … not every space is the same.” Nor, Rosenkranz noted, is every piano. Pianists must learn to adjust to a variety of instruments. Johnson said the atmosphere in these recitals is more relaxed than those on campus. The performers only play one piece, rather than the entire program….


Winterfest looking for help creating new logo & name

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News This weekend provided the first blast of winter weather, but planning for next February’s celebration of the season BG Winterfest is already well underway. Wendy Chambers, director the Bowling Green Convention and Visitors Bureau, said the committee is looking to improve the event, and that takes advanced planning, as well as fresh branding. Winterfest is holding a contest for a new name and a new logo.  The date for submissions is Thursday, Dec. 1. For details visit: https://www.facebook.com/WinterfestBG/photos/a.173662663758.124178.74230638758/10154225204718759/?type=3&theater. Contact Chambers at wendychambers@visitbgohio.org or visit the Winterfest Facebook page www.facebook.com/WinterfestBG. “We’re stepping everything up a notch,” Chambers said. “That’s why we felt it was appropriate to do the logo and renaming contest.” Winterfest has been presented for about a decade, and it’s still a work in progress. When it started, it was a new concept in the area, Chambers said. Now a number of similar events have sprung up.  “So we said ‘let’s do something to set ourselves apart.’” The 2017 event will have some notable expansions. Bowling Green State University has scheduled the 50th anniversary of the ice arena so it coincides with Winterfest. That means Falcon hockey will be added as an element of Winterfest. There’ll also be high school and university alumni hockey on tap over the weekend. And Olympic gold medal winner Scott Hamilton and Alissa Czisny are expected to return home to Bowling Green for the festivities. Also, this year the committee wants to have more happening in the downtown. “It was the missing component,” Chambers said. A tent with beverages and ice carving demonstrations will be set up in the Huntington parking lot at the corner of South Main and Clough streets. As night approaches, visitors can then avail themselves of the eating and entertainment options downtown. Businesses and organizations will have the opportunity to suggest themes for these four ice sculptures made on the Saturday of the festival. An object would be preferable to a logo for this purpose, Chambers said. Businesses and organizations can also sponsor ice…


NCNW hosts Women’s Empowerment Concert

Submitted by NCNW of BGSU The National Council of Negro Women Inc, Bowling Green State University Section, was established Spring of 2008. NCNW serves its national purpose and mission which is to lead, develop, advocate, inform, and unify the African American Women of Bowling Green State University’s campus and its surrounding communities as they support their individual, family, and societal efforts and lifestyles. NCNW implements our mission through bi-weekly meetings, community service, workshops, annual events, awareness and fundraising. NCNW hosts a variety of events to fulfill our organizational purpose and mission. This Saturday we will be hosting our first big event, which is our 8th Annual Women’s Empowerment Concert. This year our theme is “Evolution of a Black Woman: More Than a Stereotype.” Our concert is unique because it consists of students using their special talents to empower woman through rap, dance, song, spoken word, etc. This year we have some hardworking students with very raw power performing. The second portion of the concert is dedicated to a special guest performance. This year, R&B singer Cree and her live band from Detroit, Michigan will visit Bowling Green State University giving us an exclusive and uplifting performance. There will also be food, drinks, interactive games, a live DJ, other women’s organizations and raffle for exclusive art pieces of black women donated from different artists in many different states. Concert will be November 19, 2016 from 6-9PM in Oslcamp 101. Tickets can be purchased in the student union this week from 11-3PM and at the event. Tickets are $3 for students, $5 for non-students, and $1 for NCNW members. To receive a discounted ticket, guest are allowed to bring in a canned good or feminine product to receive $1 off the ticket price. Donations will be given to the Cocoon Shelter in Bowling Green, Ohio. If you have any additional questions regarding the concert, feel free to contact myself or the chair of this event Khadirah Hobbs at khobbs@bgsu.edu.


‘Sit&Tell’ uses graphic design, storytelling to unite communities

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Jenn Stucker is inviting us to pull up a chair and listen to a story — 100 stories, and 100 chairs. Stucker, chair of the graphic design division in the Bowling Green State University School of Art, is the creator of “Sit&Tell,” a project in which graphic designers and artists created chair graphics related to stories told by residents of eight Toledo neighborhoods, preserved through audio recording. BGSU students and faculty were integral to the project, a collaborative effort among Stucker; AIGA Toledo, the Professional Association for Design; the Toledo Arts Commission and local manufacturer MTS Seating, which donated the chairs. The result is a cultural and artistic achievement that unites communities and allows members to learn about themselves and one another. Stucker said that in choosing a focus for the project, she was inspired by the “strong women” theme of 2016 World Storytelling Day. Some of the stories people tell are tales of notable events, others are remembrances of and memorials to strong women and their often difficult lives, others of the power of sisterhood. As storyteller Dora Lopez said simply, “Gracias, hermanas (Thank you, sisters),” for paving the way. The project captured some notable speakers, such as Doris Hedler, the oldest living Chinese woman in Toledo, Stucker said. “It’s a terrific example of graphic design in the service of both community engagement and outstanding student learning,” said Dr. Katerina Ruedi Ray, director of the BGSU School of Art. “Sit&Tell” has already garnered two prestigious awards. First was a Platinum award in the Creativity International Print and Packaging Design awards. Submissions came from 41 countries, and of the winning works only 3 percent received platinum. The project also won a Merit Award in the respected design publication HOWMagazine’s International Design Awards, a very competitive event. Now the community has the opportunity to buy a one-of-a-kind chair, during an online auction http://sitandtell.com/auction/ that closes Nov. 28. Proceeds will go to the Arts Commission for facilitating art programming for young people in the Toledo…


BGSU cast kicks up its heels in “Drowsy Chaperone”

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News “The Drowsy Chaperone” is a love song to musical theater, and our hero barely sings a note. Instead the Man in the Chair played by Nathan Wright, listens and revels and harrumphs, and in the end reveals himself. “The Drowsy Chaperone” opens in Bowling Green State University’s Donnell Theatre tonight (Nov. 17) at 8 p.m. and continues with shows Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. with matinees Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. Advance tickets are $15 for adults and $5 for students and children. All tickets the day of the performance are $20. 419-372-8171 or visit www.bgsu.edu. The show opens in the dark with Wright talking about that sense of anticipation before the lights go on in the theater. Then they do, and he informs us what he expects from a show: “A good story and a few good songs.” And the man, being something of a curmudgeon, tells us as well what he doesn’t like, including breaking through the fourth wall and interacting with the audience, which is exactly what he is doing. And that’s what he does throughout the show, which is billed as a musical within a comedy. He puts on an LP, a prized possession, though we don’t know just why until much later. It’s an original cast recording of a 1920s musical “The Drowsy Chaperone.” As the overture starts, the man begins a guided tour of the show, and we slowly find out why it is his favorite. Even he admits it’s hardly a classic. Rather it is a spectacle created by the scriptwriters Bob Martin and Don McKellar to send up the various clichés of the style. The plot is slight. The handsome businessman Robert Martin (Justin Roth) is about to marry Janet Van de Graaff (Madi Zavitz), a darling of the stage. Their love is a whirlwind affair as love usual in a musical. Janet fell in love during a moonlit conversation about the Martin family’s oil business. She’s determined to give up her career. In “Show Off,”…


First United Methodist spreads the Gospel with rousing “Godspell”

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News “Godspell” turns the good news into happy talk. The musical, directed by Janine Baughman, is on stage at the First United Methodist Church Thursday through Saturday. The 34th annual dinner theater is sold out, but there will be about 20 tickets for show and dessert only available each night. Tickets will be $15 at the door. This after dinner seating will be at 6:45 p.m. With a book by John-Michael Tebelak and most of the music by Stephen Schwartz, the musical’s take on the Gospel is very much in the spirit of  1971 when it was created, free-spirited, free-wheeling. The show opens with a gaggle of philosophers, each spouting fragments of their philosophy creating a cacophony of abstraction. As “Tower of Babble” proceeds, they each take turns climbing a tall ladder center stage. Then John the Baptist (Will Baughman) enters, carrying a water gun, skirting the audience as he approaches the stage. He sets about baptizing the cast who have now shed their personas as philosophers. Now they are just folks, wide-eyed and happy. Baughman brings a big goofy charm to John, and then to Judas. The last to arrive is Jesus (Michael Barlos). Barlos conveys a charisma that instantly captivates the crowd and the audience. He exudes a warmth and tolerance, like a favorite teacher. He loves the rambunctiousness of his disciples, but knows when to firmly but lovingly draw the line. The cast is a team of individuals. They all have their own way of smiling, and each gets a chance to shine in a song that reveals more personality. We feel we’re getting to know them. But it really is how they work together as a group that gives the production its lift. Other cast members are: Andrew Austin, Daniel Carder, Mara Connor, D. Ward Ensign, Courtney Gilliland, Cassie Greenlee, Garrett Leininger, Emily Popp, Tyler Strayer and Sherel White. There’s a palpable joy in their interplay as they act out parables. They even pull in audience members to help them. Throughout they…


Musical friends release new recordings

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News A couple recordings with local ties have recently been released. Master guitarist Skip “Little Axe” McDonald has visited Bowling Green on several occasions. Matt Donahue, in the Popular Culture Department at Bowling Green State University, is both a fan and supporter of McDonald and has hosted the guitarist, who grew up in Dayton and now lives in England, for stays in Bowling Green. The most recent visit was to perform at the Black Swamp Arts Festival. On a couple earlier occasions, McDonald played shows at Grounds for Thought. That’s where this CDm “One Man – One Night”  was recorded back in March, 2015. McDonald’s sound is an amalgam of the various colors of African-American music. At the heart is blues, jazz and gospel. He’s also played hard rock and, as a session player for Sugarhill Records, he backed Grandmaster Flash is the early days of rap. He’s blended this into a smooth mix that delivers pointed messages and hard truths. When he has the audience join him in singing “tear the system down,” he seems prescient to what many are feeling in the wake of the presidential election. And he reminds the listeners that they’ll encounter people they met on the way up again on the way down. All this is backed by guitar mastery so assured it doesn’t call attention to itself. McDonald programs his own bass and drums tracks to provide a steady pulsating groove. The freshness of his guitar lines always imbues the music with a sense of spontaneity. Especially poignant is “My Only Friend” about falling onto the wrong path, and being trapped there. “Sin,” he sings, “is my only friend.” The recording is available at Grounds as well as at Culture Clash Records in Toledo. Another recent release with Bowling Green connections is “Ken Thomson: Restless.” Issued on LP and also available as a digital download, “Restless” features pianist Karl Larson with cellist Ashely Bathgate. Larson was one of the first graduates of the Doctor in Contemporary Music program…


Black Swamp Fine Arts School expands music offerings with ensembles for kids & adults

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Both Sophia Schmitz and Betsy Williams discovered a passion for music at an early age. Schmitz, of Perrysburg, started playing violin at 3, and was gigging when she was 11. “My mom’s an artist and my family is very musical so I was surrounded by that.” Williams, the youngest of six children, grew up in northern Kentucky with a musical mother who had the entire family singing every morning. Schmitz started teaching when she was in high school, but even before that had a goal in mind. “Since I was 12 it’s been my vision to open a studio.” For her part as the youngest of six, Williams got a late start on violin lessons. The cost of lessons was an obstacle. Her mother had taught her piano and the musical basics. “I taught myself several instruments before I settled on violin.” Those experiences and passion have now taken shape in their new endeavors. Schmitz founded the Black Swamp Fine Arts School in January, realizing her dream of opening a studio. Williams teaches violin, viola and cello at the school. Both are graduate students in the Bowling Green State University College of Musical Arts. As a BGSU undergraduate Schmitz had a minor in entrepreneurship, and in one class she had to put together a proposal for a business. When she started figuring out how much it would take to open a music studio, she realized she could make it work.  So last fall she met with lawyers and accountants, and with help pulled together a studio in space at 500 Lehman Ave. in Bowling Green where she could teach violin, piano and dance, as well as offer a space to other professional musicians associated with the university to teach. She’d already been teaching in the area, but finding a space for lessons was always a chore. Students are not allowed to use university facilities. Williams was teaching as well. She’d already been working with orchestra students at the Bowling Green High and Middle schools….


Art bus makes stop in Bowling Green

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Just out of graduate school metalsmith Autumn Brown had a problem finding a place to call home as an artist. Studio space to work and display her work was hard to find, expensive and came with landlord issues. “I was always trying to put my studio wherever I could.” Her own work focused on the combination of metalsmithing with ceramics. After working as a production jeweler, she decided to do her own venture making traditional jewelry “to pay the light bill.” Her business was Blue Onion, a tribute to her family that had roots in Vidalia, Georgia, the home of the sweet onion variety. She traces her interest to jewelry back to them. Her great-grandparents had a jewelry store and great grandmother who loved porcelain. She set up shop in an old restaurant, a studio with an “extremely rude” landlord, and shared space with other artist. Never settled, her jewelry and gear had to be ready to move with her to the next location. She notice as she moved around “all these buses” parked on farms. It was like schools “themselves” of their fleets. That got her thinking. About two years ago, she finally located a bus, on eBay, a 1985 International Harvester with less than 50,000 miles on it. She paid $2,600 for it. The bus had a varied history – a transport vehicle for the Air Force, a senior citizens bus, a hunting lodge and a home for a young couple. Her boyfriend and parents, “thought she was crazy.” Undeterred she set about transforming it into an artistic home on wheels, a place to work, teach and display her own and other artists’ jewelry. Now the Blue Onion Bus, BOB, is visiting Bowling Green. Brown was brought to campus by Bowling Green State University metals instructor Marissa Saneholtz, who knew her from graduate school. Brown gave a workshop on campus, and then set up a display of student work. The bus will be parked at Art Supply Depo, 435 E. Wooster St.,…


Horizon kids play out Aesop’s immortal lessons

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Horizon Youth Theatre’s production “The Fabulous Fables of Aesop” begins in chaos. We have 10 kids talking at once, as fast as they can. They are trying to tell all of Aesop’s fables, and this is the only way they think that they can accomplish the feat. That’s a hilariously real moment. Kids acting like kids. They do realize telling all the tales, about 600 at last count, even in that chaotic way would be impossible. What the Horizon Troupe does, using director Keith Guion’s script, is introduce us to the ancient fabulist’s world with a handful of those tales, little more than anecdotes, that continue to resonate to this day. Our language is spiked with phrases and lessons from the Greek storyteller’s fables, standing with Shakespeare and the Bible as a source for aphorisms and turns of phrase. Horizon Youth Theatre is staging “The Fabulous Fables of Aesop” tonight (Nov. 11) and Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. in the auditorium for Otsego High School. Tickets are $5. Visit horizonyouththeatre.org. Beside its exploration of the tales of Aesop, the script offers a look into what it’s like to stage a youth theater production. Starting with chaos, the actors go through all the various chores they need to right on stage. The setting is simple a few blocks that the actors themselves mostly move into place from tale to tale. A table is located at the rear of the stage where they collect props and the costumes. The opening dialogue even talks about scripting, how Aesop’s large output of fables will need to be trimmed down to a manageable number. They seemingly cast on the spot. As the moral of the first fable explains, they are stronger working as a team. That’s the message conveyed by a farmer (Lauren Carmen) to his brood of children, who learn a bunch of sticks is harder to break than an individual stick. True to the democratic nature of this troupe, the roles are…


BGSU Arts Events through Nov. 23

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Through Nov. 21—“The Deathworks of May Elizabeth Kramner,” a mixed media installation by The Poyais Group, continues through Nov. 21 in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery in the Fine Arts Center. The exhibit purports to be a re-creation by the Poyais Group of outsider artist Kramner’s (1867-1977) private lifework, a tent version of the town where she lived, with each tent representing someone who had died. Discovered by a team of anthropologists after her death but then lost in a fire, the installation was remade by the Poyais Group (Jesse Ball, Thordis Bjornsdottir, Olivia Robinson and Jesse Stiles) based on notes by one of the original anthropologists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Through Nov. 22—“Criminal Justice?” an exhibit by activist artists Carol Jacobson and Andrea Bowers, investigates the attitudes and biases embedded in the U.S. criminal justice system. Jacobson is an award-winning social documentary artist whose works in video and photography address issues of women’s criminalization and censorship. Bowers’ video “#sweetjane” and drawings explore the 2012 Steubenville, Ohio, rape case and the citizens whose activism resulted in two rape convictions. The drawings reproduce the text messages sent among the teenage witnesses to the assault on an underage young woman. “Criminal Justice?” is on view in the Willard Wankelman Gallery at the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Nov. 9—The Faculty Artist Series continues with guitarist Ariel Kasler. Kasler has performed at venues and events as diverse as the Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto, the Detroit Jazz Festival, the Grand Theater in London, Ontario, the Clore Center for Music and Dance in Israel, New Music from Bowling Green, the NASA regional conference in Urbana-Champaign, the Victorian College of Arts in Australia and Rutman’s Violins in Boston. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 10—The…


Keith Guion is a master of family entertainment

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Keith Guion wryly admits to being a bad influence on his three children. Guion is a theater devotee, as a director and writer, especially children’s theater. And all three of his children have followed his footsteps, and the Horizon Youth theatre and other troupes have been the beneficiaries. His daughter, Cassie Greenlee of Bowling Green, remembers when she was in fourth grade and had been offered the part of Annie in “Annie Warbucks.” She was concerned about taking the part, so she discussed it with her father and mother, Wendy Guion. They didn’t push her, rather discussed the pros and cons. She took the part. “That was the beginning of the end,” she said while waiting for a preview of her father’s current show, “The Fabulous Fables of Aesop.” Horizon Youth Theatre will stage the show Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. at Otsego High School. Tickets are $5 and available at the door and at horizonyouththeatre.org. Guion wrote the “Fabulous Aesop” script a number of years ago while working in the Ashland area. That’s where his children, including two sons Matthew and Jeffrey Guion, grew up and picked up the love of all aspects of theater. “I never really encouraged them to get involved,” their father said, “they just sort of did.” That included acting, all the theater crafts and writing. The play references 21 of the more than 600 fables attributed to Aesop, the storytelling slave from ancient Greece. Eight of them are acted out, while the rest are mentioned in passing. “The fables are about universal themes we all recognize,” he said. The behavior of the characters whether animal, human or even plant, are recognizable. “And most of the lessons are still pertinent today.” This amounts to a double dose of Aesop for the Horizon troupe. The older members staged “The Great Cross Country Race,” based on “The Tortoise and The Hare” in October. That was directed by Greenlee, and featured the human characters talking in…


Mikel Kuehn takes listeners on walk through his musical landscape on new CD

  By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Mikel Kuehn likes to take hikes. Oak Openings is a favorite location. He favors the wilder, natural environment to a more manicured landscape – “the messiness of nature… the entanglement of vines.” “To me, it’s really beautiful,” the composer said. That carries through in his compositions. They have a deceptive tangle of sounds, lines that stretch into the musical undergrowth reaching up, seeking light. As in nature, what may seem a disorder of trees, vines, leaves and their shadows, has an underlying order. In his compositions, Kuehn said, he wants listeners to go on a walk with him and appreciate the unruly beauty of nature. Kuehn, now on the cusp of turning 50, has just released his first CD devoted to his compositions. “Object Shadow” was released by New Focus Recordings in October. The recording features seven compositions, most written between 2004 and 2014. The outlier is the composition that closes the recording, “Between the Lynes,” which dates to 1994. This is the earliest piece in which he explores the textures and techniques evident in the later work. “It’s one of the first I’m happy with,” he said. “The pieces are all virtuosic,” Kuehn, who has taught at Bowling Green State University since 1998, said.  The performers are “all perfect.” The CD opening and closes with performances by Ensemble Dal Niente, a Chicago-based new music group. The opening “Undercurrents” features the entire 14-piece ensemble. The title piece, albeit in French not English, “Objet/Ombre,” features a 12-saxophone ensemble from BGSU with electronics that shadow their sounds. Another leading new music group Flexible Music appears on “Color Fields.” Three solo pieces for cello and electronics, guitar and marimba round out the program. Kuehn said he was able to record the CD thanks to a Guggenheim Foundation grant and an award from the Ohio Arts Council. Without that money, he said, “I never would have been able to do it.” Recording a piece for as many musicians as “Undercurrents” is especially costly, he said. “Undercurrents” was…


Artistic animals make debut in Four Corners exhibit

The exhibit “Artists 4 Animals 4open Friday evening (Nov.4) in the gallery space at Four Corners Center, 130 S. Main St. The show features the work of 22 artists, from kindergartners through senior citizens. Juror Jane Vanden Eynden, a fine art photographer and teacher, selected the top winners in each age category. These images have been reproduced on note cards that are be available at venues in town. Sales of the cards will benefit the Wood County Humane Society and the Bowling Green Arts Council. Winning the top prizes were: Jens Svendsem, “Black Cat,” Best Domestic Animal Erica England, “Fox Box,” Best Wild Animal Stella Loera, “My Cat Coco,” first place, K-4th Grade Alex Lundquest, “Snail Ball,” first place, 5th-8th Grade Amanda Kaufman, “Glancing Sanger,” first place, adult. The exhibit will run through Dec. 9.