Arts and Entertainment

Young musicians put down roots in Americana sounds

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News This could be a folk song. Jared Lucas used to play his favorite old time music at home alone. He didn’t know that other people in Bowling Green shared his love of bluegrass, folk, old country. Then one day at Jimmy John’s he spotted a flyer for the Roots Music Club on campus. It looked interesting, so he checked the club out. “I went to the meeting who found like-minded musicians who played the same music I did. We just hit it off. It was like a dream come true.” Well, that happy ending may disqualify it as a true folk ballad, but it does capture the spirit of the Roots Music Club at Bowling Green State University. The club has about 60 musicians who share a devotion for that broad swath of music called roots, or Americana, music. They get together regularly, a classroom in Moore Musical Arts serving as their coffeehouse, front porch or smoky bar. They play their own songs, strum traditional tunes and entertain musical guests. The club has even devoted an evening Beatles covers and another to members doing impersonations of some of their favorite performers. Much of this year, though, they’ve been in the proverbial woodshed, working out the music for the club’s second CD. The Roots Music Club will perform at Grounds for Thought, 174 S. Main St., Bowling Green, April 23 at 8 p.m. as the official release party. It’s the second recording by the club, said founder Mike Bryce. He said he thought about recording just about the same time he pulled the club together….


Art Walk set for downtown Bowling Green

Downtown Bowling Green and the Bowling Green Arts Council will present the 24th annual Art Walk, a celebration of the arts in the community, on Saturday, April 23. This free event showcases art from artists of all ages and disciplines including the visual and performing arts and also features art-related activities for children. The galleries throughout downtown are open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Demonstrations, activities and performances continue throughout the day. As part of the event, The Busy Thimble is hosting its third annual quilt exhibit featuring the Black Swamp Quilter’s Guild on Art Walk day, with some of the best examples of the quilters’ art at The Four Corners Center, 130 S. Main St. The exhibit will feature dozens of beautiful handmade quilts of varying sizes from small baby quilts to large bed sized quilts and wall hangings. Guild members will be working on new creations and doing appliqué, hand quilting, and machine piecing demonstrations throughout the day. The Downtown Foundation is raising funds to beautify Downtown Bowling Green with hundreds of beautiful blooming plants for the community at the Fashion Food & Fine Art Luncheon at Sam B’s. The fashion show and luncheon will be held on April 23rd at noon during the Art Walk. Attendees may choose from a menu of chicken salad or vegetarian lasagna. During lunch models will showcase spring fashions in clothing, accessories, and more provided by Ginny’s Inspired Fashions, Coyote Beads, Farm Girl’s Boutique and For Keeps. Tickets are $20 and are available now at Ginny’s Inspired Fashions, Coyote Beads, Farm Girls Vintage Boutique, Bliss Salon and Spa, Grounds For Thought, and at the Downtown Bowling…


“Getting Sara Married” tells of match made in mayhem

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News “Getting Sara Married” has just about everything you’d want in a romantic comedy: two reluctant suitors, a meddling aunt, a bout of amnesia and some serious food allergies. All those get comically twisted into a plot that not surprisingly ends up with the male ready to move his recliner into the female’s apartment. The fun is in the way the characters are manipulated in ways unlikely and comic into reaching that conclusion. The Black Swamp Players’ production of “Getting Sara Married,” written by Sam Bobrick and directed by Willard Misfeldt, a 40-year community  theater veteran, opens tonight at 8 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 1526 E. Wooster St., Bowling Green. The show continues Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. and April 22 and 23 at 8 p.m. and April 24 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $10 at the door or from Grounds for Thought or online at http://www.blackswampplayers.org/tickets/. Having a well-meaning, interfering aunt always benefits such a plot. In this case Aunt Martha (Fran Weith) fills the bill nicely. At once ditsy and single-minded, she’s concerned that her 30-something lawyer niece will “walk that long road of life alone.” “Left to your own devices,” she tells her niece in one of their hilarious telephone chats, “I’m afraid you’ll end up an old maid. By your age I had been married twice.” Isn’t that embezzler that Sara is representing single? But the niece, the Sara (Caris Cloyd) of the title, professes no interest in matrimony. She’s more concerned with preparing the defense for the embezzler. “Marriage,” Sara says at one point,…


Horizon Youth casting “Honk!”

Horizon Youth Theatre is holding auditions for their spring musical, “Honk!” (An ugly duckling story.) All students age 8-18 are welcome; no experience is necessary. A short solo piece will need to be prepared, accompanied (bring music) or a cappella; there will also be cold reads. Preparing a monologue is optional. Auditions are at First United Methodist Church, 1526 E Wooster St, Bowling Green, on Sunday April 17 4:30-6:30 pm; or Monday April 18 6:30-8:30 pm (choose one but plan to stay the entire two hours). Callbacks are Tuesday 6:30 – 8:30. Scripts are available to be perused at Wood County Public Library on the second floor (may not be checked out); audition packets with more detailed information and sample monologues can be downloaded from the website here.


BGSU Lively Arts Calendar, April 13-27

Through April 17—The MFA Thesis Exhibition continues through April 17 in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries at the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free April 14—BGSU vocal students will perform works from various opera scenes. The recital begins at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free April 15—BGSU’s Wind Symphony will perform under the direction of Bruce Moss. The recital begins at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets the day of the performance are $10. Music majors have free admission with ID. To purchase online, visit bgsu.edu/arts. Or call the box office at 419-372-8171. April 16—The College of Musical Arts’ A Capella Choir and University Men’s Chorus will perform in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. The recital begins at 8 p.m. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets the day of the performance are $10. Musical majors have free admission with ID. To purchase online, visit bgsu.edu/arts, or call the box office at 419-372-8171. April 17—The College of Musical Arts’ Collegiate Chorale and University Women’s Chorus will perform in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. The recital begins at 3 p.m. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets the day of the performance are $10. Musical majors have free admission with ID. To purchase…


Wind symphony features new work by Adler & solo by tuba legend Perantoni

Audiences at the upcoming concert by the Wind Symphony at Bowling Green State University have two special treats in store: the premiere of a commissioned work by renowned composer Samuel Adler and a performance by legendary tuba player and guest artist Daniel Perantoni. The symphony, under the direction of Dr. Bruce Moss, will perform at 8 p.m. April 15 in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Moss writes of the Adler piece, “The work is a beautiful adagio, titled ‘The river that mines the silences of stones, an Adagio for Wind Ensemble’ (from ‘The Book of Hours’ by German poet Rainer Maria Rilke), and was commissioned by BGSU Bands, our Mid American Center for Contemporary Music, and nine other university band programs.” Perantoni joins the Wind Symphony on the “Concerto for Tuba,” by Robert Jager, and will offer some entertaining encores. The Tuba Provost Professor at the Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University, Perantoni, or “Mr. P” as his students call him, is a legendary tuba artist, teacher and pedagogue as well as a trailblazer in a variety of genres including work as a solo recitalist, chamber musician, jazz musician, and in instrument design. He was given the Lifetime Achievement Award by the executive board of T.U.B.A. A true legion of his former students hold prestigious positions in major performing ensembles and music schools around the world, a testament to his abilities as a teacher, mentor and friend. He is cited as a “tubist’s tubist,” whose playing has a “lyrical, clear, and singing tone, along with his impeccable musical style.” Perantoni has been a featured artist in…


Singers celebrate the art of song on BGSU’s Conrad competition

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Minnita Daniel-Cox knows what it’s like to sing a few bars in these young singers’ gowns. Daniel-Cox, a Bowling Green State University graduate, returned to campus Saturday to help judge the Dr. Marjorie Conrad Art Song Competition. Now an accomplished professional singer and professor, she knows how participating in the competition can help the young vocalists develop their artistry. When she was at BGSU, the Conrad event, now in its 17th year, was in its infancy. She participated in 2001 as a sophomore and “surprised myself,” she said, when she placed second. As a junior, she returned overconfident, she said, and didn’t make the finals. She won first place as a senior, knowing that talent must be paired with hard work to achieve her goals. Those are the kind of lessons that have shaped her career, she said, and will provide a solid foundation for the young musicians who participated on Saturday. The competition honors both the singers and pianists. Daniel-Cox with fellow judges Carol Dusdieker, who teaches voice at Heidelberg University, and Anne Kessel, director of collaborative piano at SUNY Fredonia, listened and evaluated 12 undergraduate duos and 15 graduate duos. (In all 42 musicians participated with some pianists working with as many as three singers. The division is determined by the singer’s status.) Undergraduate winners were: soprano Jenna Seeright and pianist Benjamin Crook. Graduate winners were: soprano Kate Pomrenke and Crook. Also honored in the undergraduate division were: mezzo-soprano ShayLyssa Alexander and pianist Xiaohui Ma, second place, and baritone Luke Serrano and pianist Yi Chieh Chiu, third place. Other winners in the…


Cherry Blossom Festival celebrates Japanese culture

Fifteen years after Japanese graduates of Bowling Green State University showed their appreciation for the school by planting cherry trees on campus, several are returning. In fall, 2001, eight Japanese alumni came to campus for the planting of the trees. Graduate Masatoshi Emori had spearheaded the effort, inspired by the cherry trees in the nation’s capital. Fittingly then First Lady Hope Taft was on hand for the planting. Her husband’s great-grandfather was president when those trees took root in Washington D.C. as a sign of peace between Japan and the United States. Thanks to the Schedel Garden three of the BGSU trees were cuttings from the originals. The next spring Akiko Jones, an instructor of Japanese, initiated the first Cherry Blossom Festival to celebrate the plantings. Over the last 15 years, more trees have been planted and the Cherry Blossom Festival has grown. Now there are about 80. In Japan, the blossoming of the cherry trees is celebrated by outdoor hikes and picnics. Given the questionable weather in Northwest Ohio, the ceremony has been moved inside since its damp, very windy inaugural event in 2002. Last year with the event staged in the Lenhart Grand Ballroom of the Bowen-Thompson Student Union, more than 800 attended. Jones expects to attract even more celebrants this year when the event is held Saturday, April 16, from 4 to 8 p.m. in the ballroom. Attendance at the event, a celebration of Japanese culture, has increased in every year, outgrowing several venues. Jones credits the involvement of students with keeping the event going. When it started, she said, she never imagined it lasting this long….


Ancient anxieties … students study & exhibit objects from Toledo Museum of Art

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University Art history students got to rummage around in the Toledo Museum of Art’s attic … figuratively speaking, that is. The 18 students in Sean Leatherbury’s Professional Practices in Art History class had the opportunity to select objects from the museum’s collection that are not on display to present in an exhibit of their own. Leatherbury said that Adam Levine, curator of ancient art, pulled out about 100 objects, most probably never exhibited, for the students to peruse. They each selected one or two, and then as a class narrowed down what would be included in the show. They returned to the museum to study the objects and did research on them. Working with a graphic design class taught by Todd Childers, the students assembled the exhibit “More Than War and Wine: Anxiety and Relief in Antiquity.” The exhibit is on display in the lobby of the Bryan Gallery in the Fine Arts Building through April 15. Leatherbury said that the students wanted to show that there was more to ancient society than the stereotypical images of wine and warriors, though the exhibit does include some of that as well. What they wanted to show, Leatherbury said, was that 2,500 years ago Greeks also suffered from anxiety. The objects were grouped to represent aspects related to that theme. There are objects related to: gender issues; myth as a way to cope with anxiety; and worship and ritual as a way to resolve anxiety. The students, he said, didn’t actually get to handle the objects. Instead Toledo Museum staff brought them to…


Showtime for ideas for a better world at BGSU’s The Hatch

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Surrounded by music, lights, a wise-cracking master of ceremony, video projections of tweets, 11 university students got down to the serious business of pitching ways to make people’s lives better. During Hatch 2016 Thursday night, those students presented eight projects to a five-member panel of Bowling Green State University alumni, who were ready to invest thousands of dollars to help these budding entrepreneurs launch their businesses. Just about all those projects ended up walking away with an initial offer of money in exchange for a stake in the company, and a step closer to solving problems large and small, for people from preschoolers to elders, and everyone who uses water. For Kiersten Castner and Collin Newton, their Trace Case would help people prone to losing their credit cards keep track of them. For Alyssa Batch, her Comfort Covers would employ key words and symbols to foster conversations between people suffering from dementia and their families, friends and caregivers. For Jarrod Cain, his StuPro Match would help college students find the professor who best matches their learning styles. For Baqer Aljabr and Ryan Murphy, their Park Shark would lower costs for airports, universities and others managing massive parking lots with a robot that gives tickets and provides video surveillance. For Meredith Moore and Khory Katz, their Easy-Loft Beds would help college students expand the living space in their dorm rooms. For Sophia Schmitz, her Play-to-Play interactive board game will help music students as young as preschoolers learn their note names and other basics. For Austin Farrington, his Trac Band would allow elders more freedom of…


Toledo Museum marks 10th anniversary of opening of Glass Pavilion with “Hot Spot” exhibit

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART TOLEDO – A rare opportunity to see more than 80 modern works of studio glass from private and corporate collections is being offered in a special exhibition this spring and summer at the Toledo Museum of Art Glass Pavilion. Hot Spot: Contemporary Glass from Private Collections, which opens April 15 and continues through Sept. 18 showcases contemporary North American, European, Australian and Asian studio glass. Many of the objects are on public view for the first time. Curated by Jutta-Annette Page, TMA’s senior curator of glass and decorative art, the exhibition celebrates the 10th anniversary of the opening of the SANAA-designed Glass Pavilion as well as shines a light on the impressive and storied glass legacy at TMA. The works of art will be featured in seven thematic groups – the human figure, animals and plants, landscapes, vessel forms, the spirit world, abstract forms and outer space. Among the artists are Joyce Scott, Nicholas Africano, Tom Moore, Kimiake Higuchi, Preston Singletary, Debora Moore and Tobias Møhl. “This exhibition is the perfect way to reflect on current directions in the studio glass movement in the U.S. as well as studio glass from around the world, particularly work by glass artists not currently represented in TMA’s collection,” Page said. “Toledo is the Glass City and the Toledo Museum of Art, as a major player in the history of studio glass as an art form, is committed to nurturing innovative contemporary glass artists through its collections, programs and facilities.” The Hot Spot exhibition is made possible by 2016 Exhibition Program Sponsor ProMedica, by Museum members and by a…


BGSU Lively Arts Calendar, April 7–20

April 7­—“More Than War and Wine: Anxiety and Relief in Antiquity” is an exhibition by BGSU graphic design students of Todd Childers and graduate-level art history students of Dr. Sean Leatherbury in collaboration with the Toledo Museum of Art. The students will present an “Object Talk” about the artifacts, exploring the anxieties that may have influenced the creation of ancient works of art. The talk will begin at 1:30 p.m. in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery lobby in the Fine Arts Center followed by a reception at 4:30 p.m. The exhibition remains on display through April 15. Free April 7—The College of Musical Arts’ Guitar Ensemble will perform at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free April 7—The Visiting Writer Series features prize-winning writer Amy Gustine. Her short fiction has appeared in The Chicago Tribune’s Printers Row Journal, The Kenyon Review and The Wisconsin Review, among others. Gustine’s book, “Pity Us Instead,” was released in February and has appeared on numerous featured lists including Publisher’s Weekly and The Millions. Her reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free April 7—The International Film Series concludes with the 2013 Chinese film “Bei Jing yu shang Xi Ya Tu (Finding Mr. Right).” A city girl travels to Seattle to give birth to a child who will help her win a rich, married boyfriend. When she arrives in Seattle, nothing goes right; she’s stuck sharing a small house with two other pregnant women, she has trouble reaching her boyfriend on the phone and eventually, even his credit card stops working. The only person willing to spend…


Showell stepping down as music dean at BGSU (update)

By BG INDEPENDENT NEWS Jeffrey Showell is stepping down as dean of the College of Musical Arts after five years in the position. The announcement was made Tuesday morning in a letter to faculty by Provost Rodney Rogers. Rogers wrote: “In his five years at BGSU, Dr. Showell has led the college in notable accomplishments, including raising the academic profile of its student body and the renovation of facilities. He also facilitated an important new partnership with WGTE-FM, ‘New Music from Bowling Green,’ which has provided a showcase for the college’s talented faculty and students on public broadcasting stations across the country.” The university has appointed William Mathis, professor of trombone and chair of the Department of Music Performance Studies, as interim dean. Rogers said that Mathis, who has been on the faculty since 2000, had “strong support” from the faculty. Rogers wrote that Mathis “has held a variety of leadership roles that have given him administrative and budget experience as well as an intimate understanding both of the college and of the University as a whole.” Rogers told faculty senate Tuesday that the search for a new dean will begin next week. Showell in an email said he will take administrative leave and then return to serve as a special assistant in the provost office working on special projects for a semester. After that semester he will be 65 and will retire. He said he plans to continue to live in Bowling Green, and devote himself to volunteer work. Showell has worked 38 years in academy, including the last 17 as an administrator. From 1982-1990, he also was the…



BGSU student metals and jewelry on display at Wood County library

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Student Metal Arts Council from Bowling Green State University’s School of Art is “Forging Ahead” with an exhibit at the Wood County Public Library. The “Forging Ahead” exhibit features about two dozen works of jewelry and metal art in the library’s display window. The exhibit opened Saturday and continues through April 15.                   The exhibit is part of the effort to teach students in the arts professional skills, said Andrew Kuebeck, the faculty advisor for the council. Those efforts include an entrepreneurship class specifically for visual artists taught by Gene Poor. The exhibit was organized by the council’s treasurer Michaela Monterosso. For her the library was a natural venue for the show. Back in her hometown of Terryville, Connecticut, she would place her work in the local library. “I’d put my piece there and there was so much traffic going in and out of the public library that I got a lot of commissions, so I decided it would be a good opportunity for the Student Metal Arts Council.” The show was open to all who submitted work. “It’s meant to be an encouraging event,” she said. Monterosso wanted to give her fellow students a no-stress chance to display their work. “It’s good for their resumes,” she said, “and good for mine.” The council awarded first prize in the show to Katelyn Turner’s “Mother of Pearl” and second place to Diana Bibler’s “The Hero.” It promotes the council and the work being done on campus by jewelers and metalsmiths. Monterosso was attracted to BGSU by…