Campus

BGSU Arts Events through Feb. 21

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Feb. 9—The Elsewhere Season begins with “The Winter Barrel,” written and directed by film faculty member Dr. Eileen Cherry-Chandler. The staged reading will begin at 8 p.m. in the Marjorie Conrad M.D. Choral Room, located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Feb. 11—The David D. Dubois Piano Festival and Competition features guest artist Chu-Fang Huang. Winner of a 2011 Avery Fisher Career Grant, Huang debuted as a finalist in the 2005 Van Cliburn Piano Competition and as First Prize Winner of the Cleveland Piano Competition that same year. In 2006, she won a place on the Young Concert Artist roster. Her performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets are $7 call 419-372-8171  or online at http://www.bgsu.edu/the-arts.html. Feb. 12—The David D. Dubois Piano Festival and Competition will start at 9 a.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. The annual event supports student pianists by providing scholarships for high school students to attend BGSU, encouraging undergraduate students to develop innovative programming ideas for outreach projects and supporting current piano students to participate in music festivals around the world. Free Feb. 14—Music at the Manor House features BGSU violin students. The performance will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Manor House in Wildwood Metropark, 5100 W. Central Ave., in Toledo. Free Feb. 14—Tuesdays at the Gish continue with the 1968 film “Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One,” directed by William Greaves. This film on the making of a film involves three camera crews capturing the process and personalities (director, actors, crew, bystanders) involved. Led by visionary auteur William Greaves, the collective project also depends on his multi-racial crew, who stage an on-set rebellion that becomes the film’s drama and platform for sociopolitical critique and revolutionary philosophy. Filmed in Central Park, the film is a vivid document of this historical period and moment in American independent cinema. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Feb. 16—The Creative Writing Program’s…


Women urged to throw their hats in ring for elections

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Women are still playing catch up attaining elected positions in the U.S. Statistics show that when women run for elected offices, they are elected at the same rate as men, according to Mary Krueger, director of BGSU Women’s Center. The disparity exists because fewer women throw their hats into the rings as candidates. “They don’t run nearly as often,” Krueger said. “Let’s get past this.” To help young college age women interested in attaining public office, the BGSU Women’s Center is offering a program called “Elect Her,” on Saturday. The workshop is designed for women eyeing spots in student government, politics or any leadership positions. According to the Center for American Women and Politics, the following offices are filled by far fewer women than men. The statistics show: U.S. Senate: 21 percent women; 16 Democrats and 5 Republicans. U.S. House: 19 percent women; 62 Democrats and 21 Republicans. State senates: 22 percent women; 253 Democrats, 175 Republicans, 13 non-partisan, 1 Independent. State houses: 26 percent women; 854 Democrats, 528 Republicans, 4 Progressive, 3 Independent, 1 Working Families Party. State governors and other state elected officials: 24 percent, 32 Democrats, 41 Republicans, 1 non-partisan. Mayors of 100 largest cities: 19 percent women. Mayors of cities with over 30,000 population: 19 percent women. The disparity certainly is not due to competence, Krueger said. However, it could be partially due to men getting a couple centuries’ advantage. It has not even been a full century since women gained the right to vote in 1920 with the 19th Amendment. “Over generations in this country, women have been discouraged from running for office,” Krueger said. “There’s a legacy of being forbidden. The men have had a couple hundred years’ head start.” This is the second time the “Elect Her” workshop has been hosted by the Women’s Center. Krueger said she had no idea of the heightened relevancy it would have – with so many women now being involved in or inspired by the national women’s marches. “When we planned this and picked…


Optimal Aging Institute offers programs on pet therapy, care for dementia patients, ukulele & more

From BGSU OPTIMAL AGING INSTITUTE The Optimal Aging Institute at Bowling Green State University invites older adults to embrace wellness with a full list of programs, ranging from pet therapy to osteoporosis prevention to photography made during the Great Depression. All programs are free but registration is encouraged at www.bgsu.edu/oai or by calling (419) 372-8244. The first two programs will be held at the Bowling Green State University Student Recreation Center, with free, convenient parking in Lot X off of Mercer Road, right next to the recreation center, for registrants. “Pet Therapy: Sharing the Joy” (Feb. 23 at 10:30 a.m.) explores the history of pet therapy and its benefits to older adults, and offers activities with pet therapy animals. The presenters are Cynthia Spitler, Ph.D., who is a licensed nursing home administrator and teaches in BGSU’s Gerontology Program, and Christopher Dunn, Ph.D., BGSU associate professor of criminal justice, who visits facilities with pet therapy animals and whose students conduct field research on pet therapy as part of a research methods class. “Osteoporosis: Prevention through Exercise” (March 2, 1 p.m) will provide exercises and tips to strengthen bones and improve balance, coordination and flexibility, as well as give information on the disease. Its presenter, Robyn Miller, Ed.S., is an instructor in BGSU’s School of Human Movement, Sport & Leisure Studies, and is an ACSM-certified personal trainer. A two-session “Ukulele for Beginners” class, which is co-sponsored by Bowling Green Parks and Recreation, will take place on March 22 and 29 from 10:30 a.m. until noon at the Simpson Garden Community Center at 1291 Conneaut Ave. If you have ever wanted to learn to play a musical instrument, register for these two sessions to learn how to strum, play a few chords, sing familiar songs and learn some new ones, all in a fun and relaxing environment. There is no experience necessary and instruments will be provided. The presenter, Lisa Gruenhagen, Ph.D., is an associate professor of music education at BGSU; while at the Eastman School of Music, she became involved with the New Horizons music program, which provides entry…


Faculty senate hears about parking, approves graduate program & honorary degree

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Faculty Senate at Bowling Green State University was not stuck in park when it met Tuesday. Its agenda was jammed, but it kept moving, at least with as much speed as it could manage with presentations on faculty files related to merit and promotion, charter revisions, and a change in who is qualified to teach and supervise graduate students. Then there was the discussion of parking. Aaron Kane, manager of Parking Services, explained the new system his office will be initiating. Now parking enforcement officers will cruise lots and scan license plate numbers to determine if cars are parked where they should be. The system, he said, has many advantages. It should save time and energy. “Improved productivity is going to be a major benefit,” he said. People will no longer have to stand in line to get their hanging passes. The registration process will be done all online. Each faculty member will be able to register two cars. Students will be able to register one car. People with loaners or rental cars will be able to go online and change the registration so that car will be covered instead of one of the two originally registered. When prospective students and their families come to campus they will be able to register their vehicles ahead of time. At the ice arena, Kane said, people coming for open skate, now have to park, run inside, get a tag, and return to the vehicle to put it in. Now they’ll just give their license plate number at the desk. The system will allow parking services to gather data on which lot are filling up, with the possibility of an app that will tell commuting students which lots have spaces and which are full. The system Kane said may be extended to pay lots, allowing visitors to pay for parking without going to the kiosk. The system, he said, has worked well at Ohio State and Cleveland State. New graduate degree The senate also approved a new Master of Arts in…


Citizens get peek at BG Community Action Plan

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Adam Kirian and Adrian Lowien came to the Community Action Plan open house for two reasons – 10-week-old twins Charlie and Freddie, who attended bundled in blankets. “We wanted to get some input for these little guys as they get older,” Kirian said as he looked at the tiny twins. The couple lives on the East Side of Bowling Green, which is the focus of much of the community action plan. “I’m glad they are trying to clean up the area,” Lowien said. The couple has a home on Clough Street, with several neighboring rental properties leased to BGSU students. “Sometimes they are really good kids and sometimes you want to call the cops every night,” Kirian said. Overall, the young couple liked what they saw at the community plan open house held Tuesday evening in the atrium of the Wood County Courthouse. “We like a lot of it,” Lowien said, especially the emphasis on open spaces. “I’d like to see more green spaces and parks. That would encourage more families.” From the other side of town was Beverly Miner, who also approved of the plans presented on big charts. “The theory is good,” she said, then added, “But it takes money to do things.” Miner particularly liked the proposals to upgrade housing, work on bettering the relationship between the city and the campus, putting a bike path on Court Street, and planning a Court Street festival. In fact, she’d like to see each area of the city have festivals. “I think the East Side kind of gets a bad rep,” she said. “I think we’ve got a great town.” Miner also thought the community planning process benefited from bringing in an outside firm as a consultant. “I’ve been impressed with the people here,” she said of the Camiros group from Chicago. “They can come in with an objective view.” Jill Carr, who served on the city’s future land use committee, appreciated seeing the effort taken to the next level. “It’s really encouraging.” “I love the emphasis…


Still no action in Faculty Senate on sanctuary petition

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Bowling Green State University Faculty Senate meeting Tuesday unfolded much as the January session had. Senators were greeted by a gauntlet of protestors outside McFall, and then when the senate convened the sign-carrying demonstrators lined the assembly hall quietly and listened through President Mary Ellen Mazey’s remarks. And when she addressed the issue they were concerned about, a request for a sanctuary campus, they heard the same stance. The university must adhere to the law. But the university will do everything within the parameters of the law to assist foreign students and faculty as well as students with status under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. The university has 11 DACA students and 21 with visas or green cards from the seven countries covered by the travel ban. Mazey has publicly supported proposed federal legislation, the BRIDGE Act that would extent DACA status to people who were brought to the country illegally as children. On Tuesday, Mazey announced she joined 600 other higher education leaders in signing a letter opposing the travel ban issued by the administration. While acknowledging the need to “safeguard” the country, the letter states the signatories also recognize “the need for the United States to remain the destination of choice for the world’s best and brightest students, faculty, and scholars.” This openness promotes American values abroad as well as promoting scientific and technological advances, the letter states. When asked, Mazey would not speculate on what action the university would take if these legislative and lobbying efforts failed. Professor Francisco Cabanillas then asked if those efforts fail “would we have to say yes in our town” to immigration officials checking the status of students and faculty, referencing the Not In Our Town anti-bias program that Mazey help found. Mazey reiterated that all students and faculty are here legally, so she doesn’t see why immigration officials would come to BGSU. “We have confidence in the law.” But for those pushing for sanctuary status that is not enough. Outside before the meeting, Ethnic Studies professor Michaela Walsh,…


Teen pianists selected to compete in Dubois Festival at BGSU (Update)

The David D. Dubois Piano Festival and Competition has selected 28 young pianists as semifinalists to compete Saturday, Feb. 11, with finals Sunday, Feb. 12 at Bowling Green State University’s Moore Musical Arts Center. All events will take place in Bryan Recital Hall. The pianists will compete for a top prize of $3,000, with $2,000 for second and $1,000 for first. The festival’s guest artist will be pianist Chu-Fang Huang. Huang will present a master class Friday from 2:30–4:30 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall and she will perform a solo recital Saturday at 8 p.m.  Contact 419-372-8171,  or online at http://www.bgsu.edu/the-arts.html for tickets. She will also judge the finals on Sunday. The teenage pianists come from 10 states and Ontario. The semifinalists were selected based on a video recording submitted to the festival. The pianists prepare a program of 20 to 30 minutes in length that includes selections from at least three of four style periods – Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Contemporary. One movement from a Classical sonata is required. All works must be memorized with the exception of those written after 1945. The semifinals will be held Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center on campus. Those selected as finalists will perform Sunday beginning at 8:30 a.m. Recipient of a 2011 Avery Fisher Career Grant, Huang burst onto the music scene as a finalist in the 2005 Van Cliburn Piano Competition, and as First Prize Winner of the Cleveland Piano Competition that same year.  In 2006, she won First Prize in the Young Concert Artists International Auditions and made critically acclaimed debuts at Carnegie’s Zankel Hall and at the Kennedy Center in the Young Concert Artists Series. Huang has performed in Canada on the Vancouver Recital Society Series, in Australia with the Sydney Symphony Orchestra and the Australian Chamber Orchestra, in China with the Sichuan Symphony Orchestra and the China, Shenzhen, and Liaoning Philharmonic Orchestras, at the famed Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, the Ruhr Piano Festival in Germany, the Mustafa Kemal Center in Istanbul, and at the Musée du…


St. Baldrick’s clip jobs raise money for childhood cancer research

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Amid smiles and tears, songs and cheers, dozens of good-hearted folks sacrificed their hair Sunday in solidarity with the thousands of young cancer patients who have no choice about going bald. Students and others were lined up Sunday for the fifth St. Baldrick’s Foundation fundraiser at Bowling Green State University. Cassie Mere, the coordinator of the fundraiser, said when she presented herself as a candidate to lead the event which is sponsored by National Residence Hall Honorary along with the Office of Residence Life, she stated she would not have her head shaved. But Sunday morning, caught up in the spirit, she was sporting a new clean clipped hairdo. The more she learned about the cause the more she wanted to participate. The event will top $100,000 raised by the BGSU / St. Baldrick’s Day event since it was started to raise money to support the fight against childhood cancer.  The goal for Sunday was $22,000, and as of Monday morning it had collected $16,161 with donations still coming in. In all 89 heads were shaved. Participants were mainly students, but others, including Mere’s grandfather and her boyfriend’s little brother, also got shaved. As Caitlyn VanDyke’s auburn tresses fell from her head, she held of a lock of her hair and contemplated it. Within minutes she was bald, smiling at the strange sensation of rubbing her exposed scalp. She was inspired by a high school friend “who lost the battle to cancer.” Leading up to the event she’s been talking up St. Baldrick’s. She secured $550 in pledges. VanDyke isn’t concerned about the questions her new look will prompt. “I’m looking forward to it,” she said. “I’m excited. I’m proud. It’s not a big deal to me. It’s just hair. It will grow back.” Some women surrendered their long cultivated ponytails. Mere said that the event works with Pantene Beautiful Lengths, which uses hair to make wigs for cancer patients. Sunday’s event yielded 40 ponytails for donation. Zach Beach was participating for his third year. He stops getting a…


Bruce Moss named OMEA Outstanding Educator

By Marie Dunn-Harris ’95 From BGSU MARKETING &COMMUNICATIONS Ask any BGSU music student, past or present, who Dr. Bruce Moss is and chances are you will hear nothing but praise and admiration. Moss, a professor and the director of band activities for 23 years in Bowling Green State University’s College of Musical Arts, was named Ohio Music Education Association’s (OMEA) 2017 Most Outstanding Educator of the Year. The award recognizes and honors an OMEA member each year for his or her outstanding service, dedication and overall contribution to music education. The finalists need at least six nomination letters to be considered for the honor, and Dr. Moss had 65. “I was surprised and humbled beyond words when seeing the long list of names of former students and peers from all over the country who wrote letters on my behalf,” Moss said. The list of people who nominated Moss is impressive. Some are former colleagues, but many are students who have gone on to pursue successful music careers. One of them is U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Ryan Nowlin, assistant director of “The President’s Own” U.S. Marine Band. Nowlin studied with Moss for his undergraduate and graduate degrees. In his letter, Nowlin said, “Dr. Moss’s selfless commitment to students, stalwart advocacy for music education, personal and professional integrity, genuine care and concern for student growth, development and success, and his high level of musicianship make him a role model, mentor and tireless devotee to all fortunate enough to study under his baton.” Another world-class musician and nominator is John Hagstrom, a trumpet student of Moss when he taught public school. He now performs in the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. “As I look back at the most important influences on my early development it is clear to me that Bruce Moss was crucially important for my tenacity and honest improvement despite many obstacles,” Hagstrom said. “His focus on quality and finding solutions models a strategic mind-set that I have emulated along with many of his other successful students. “That Bruce Moss is an outstanding music educator is well documented…


Scientists worried about Trump’s impact on science

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Trump Administration antipathy toward the Environmental Protection Agency has scientists at Bowling Green State University worried. Of particular concern to the region is how changes at the EPA could affect efforts to protect and restore the Great Lakes. Trump views environmental protection regulations as a hindrance to economic growth and has appointed Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, who has sued the EPA on numerous occasions, to head the agency. “There’s a lot of uncertainty and a lot of worry,” said George Bullerjahn, a professor of research excellence in biological science. Bullerjahn has been heavily involved in studying the cyanotoxins in Lake Erie that closed down the Toledo water supply in 2014. He and colleague Robert Michael McKay worked with Republican U.S. Rep. Bob Latta’s staff to draft the Drinking Water Protection Act. The legislation was the rare law that made it through a Congress deeply divided along partisan lines. Bullerjahn said that he felt that Latta was “swimming upstream” in backing the legislation when many of those in the conservative legislator’s fellow Republicans wanted to see the EPA abolished. Much of his funding comes from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Science Foundation. Sientists there are also nervous. But, Bullerjahn said, “EPA is the whipping boy.” McKay shares Bullerjahn’s concern. “Our new administration is very unpredictable.” That was evident when just after the Inauguration the administration ordered a freeze on all grants and contracts. The Washington Post reports that has been lifted, but uncertainty remains on other fronts. In an email, McKay wrote: “Also unclear how the actions of the administration will impact the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative which is administered by EPA. Notably, in December, Congress authorized $300 million to carry through 2021 and apparently language in the Bill directs those funds to be spent on the Great Lakes, so perhaps that offers some protections. However, there are other activities/initiatives directed by federal EPA that could impact our ability to monitor the health of the lakes. “Potentially affecting BGSU scientists would be modifications to…


BGSU Faculty Association responds to governor’s proposed budget for higher ed

From the BGSU-FA Dear BGSU faculty, The Ohio Conference of the American Association of University Professors (OCAAUP) has released a statement regarding the latest Ohio state budget released by Governor John Kasich. Please see below for the full statement: More of the Same in Kasich’s Latest Budget On Monday, January 30, Gov. Kasich unveiled the highlights of his executive biennial state budget, which covers Fiscal Years 2018-19. There were no major surprises, as the components followed suit with what the governor has pushed for in previous budgets. Tax Cuts & Shifts Kasich’s executive budget continues his focus on reducing the personal income tax while raising the sales tax and broadening the services tax. His plan would increase the severance taxes on oil and gas, as well as hike the “sin taxes” on cigarettes and alcohol. Reducing progressive taxes and enhancing regressive taxes has the effect of disproportionately rewarding the wealthiest Ohioans and hurting the poorest Ohioans. Unfortunately, these are the same tax policies that have led to revenue shortfalls — the shortfalls that prompted the governor to proclaim that the state is on the verge of recession. There is little evidence to suggest that Ohio could be headed to recession, but there is much evidence to suggest that income tax cuts produce less revenue. Ohio has a revenue problem, not a recession problem. Higher Education Freezes and Funding In step with his previous budgets, Kasich has called for tuition and fee freezes at institutions of higher education for the next two years. His budget would increase overall higher education funding by 1% in FY 2018 and then an additional 1.8% in FY 2019. State Share of Instruction (SSI) According to the administration’s budget recommendations, State Share of Instruction (SSI) — the primary means of financial support to colleges and universities — will increase 1% in each fiscal year. In pure dollar amounts, not adjusting for inflation, this will put SSI slightly above where it was under Gov. Strickland’s final budget in FY 2011. While we commend the slight increases in funding, we still have a…


Trying to make students far from home feel at home

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Prior to President Donald Trump’s travel ban for seven countries, the biggest problem for some international students at Bowling Green State University was just getting around their new city. The Bowling Green City-University Relations Commission has been discussing how to make that transition for international students smoother. The group has heard stories about international students feeling uncomfortable, even hesitant to speak in public because their accents could make them targets. But when the commission inquired recently about international students, the top concerns expressed were more basic – like rides around town and friendship of local families. Dr. Marcia Salazar-Valentine, director of the international student program at BGSU, said there are currently 1,172 students from other countries studying here. More than 82 nations are represented, with the highest number from China, followed by India, Saudi Arabia, Canada and Nepal. The office makes sure all the students have the necessary F-1 visas. Staff picks them up at the airport, brings them to BGSU, and tries to do an overall orientation on the campus and the community. That can be an awful lot to digest when coming to a new country, Salazar-Valentine said. During a three-day orientation, the new students are given information on local transportation, apartment options, restaurants and churches. They learn about academic honesty, student legal services, how to get a driver’s license, and how to get to stores in town. They also learn about sporting events on campus, “so they can form friendships,” Salazar-Valentine said. “We try to make the students as much as possible integrate into BGSU and the city community.” Bowling Green City Council member Daniel Gordon asked about discriminatory treatment of international students in the city. Salazar-Valentine said students are advised to report issues to the student affairs office, and problems are dealt with on an individual basis. Gordon suggested the city-university commission continue discussing how to improve welcoming international students and planning an event to give the students an opportunity to express their concerns. Amira Hassnaoui, a graduate student from Tunisia, said international…


BG ready to chill out at Winterfest (updated)

From BG CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU The BGSU Ice Arena is celebrating 50 years with Bobcat and Falcon hockey games, pregame party, post reception, skating show and a visit from Scott Hamilton and Alissa Cziny. Ice sculptures will be on display in the Huntington Bank Parking lot downtown along with our new Chillabration Tent serving beer, wine, snacks and entertainment from 4-11 pm on Feb. 11. The 9th Annual Winterfest held in Bowling Green Ohio is on Feb. 10, 11 and 12 which is always the coolest weekend of the year. This Three-day fun-filled community event features Ice Sculpting Demonstrations, Horse-Drawn Carriage Rides, Ice Skating, Chili & Soup Cook-Off, Frostbite Fun Run, Cookie Creations, Youth Dodge Ball, Snow Globe Co-ed Bubble Soccer, Window Youth Art Exhibition, Four Corners Gallery BGHS Art Exhibit and WC Library events to include Home Depot Break It Make It, Hot Chocolate Story time and I Heart Ohio Scavenger Hunt. Schedule of Events (subject to change) Schedule of Events, Feb 10-12, 2017 FRIDAY BGHS Art Show, Four Corners Gallery, 10 a.m. -7 p.m. Youth Dodgeball, BG Community Center, 3:30 p.m. ($8 fee includes pizza) 2 vs 2 Co-ed Snow Globe Soccer Tournament, BG Community Center, 6 p.m. ($15 per team, 3 games guaranteed,  final at 8 p.m.) BGHS Bobcat Hockey vs. Findlay, Slater Family Ice Arena, 7 p.m. (ticket required) Skate with the Bobcats, Slater Family Ice Arena, 8:30-10 p.m. (skate rental available) SATURDAY Ice Carving Demo by Ice Creations, Slater Family Ice Arena, 10 a.m. I Heart Ohio Scavenger Hunt, WC Public Library Second Floor, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. BGHS Art Show, Four Corners Gallery, 10-2 pm 1 mile Frostbite Fun Run presented by BIGGBY, City Park, 11 a.m. (pre-registration w/ fees) Ice Carving Demonstration by  Ice Creations,  Huntington Bank Parking Lot, noon to 4 p.m. Chili & Soup Cook Off, Vet Building at City Park, noon to 2 p.m. ($5 tasting) Cookie Creations for Kids, City Park, 1:30-2:30 p.m. BGHS Art Show, Four Corners Gallery, 2-6 p.m. Break It Make It with Home Depot: Cold Slushy Fun!, WC Public…


BGSU Arts events through Feb. 7

Feb. 1—The Faculty Artist Series continues with percussionist Daniel Piccolo. Piccolo has appeared as a soloist with the Toledo Symphony Orchestra, the University of Michigan Percussion Ensemble, and as a guest artist at colleges and universities around the world. He is also an active composer, writing and arranging music for and featuring percussion instruments. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Feb. 2—The Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series features visiting poet Becca Klaver. Author of chapbooks and poetry collections, Klaver has had poems appear in APR, Fence and jubilat. The craft talk and reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Feb. 3—The Brown Bag Music Series will present a musical theatre extravaganza by pianists from the College of Musical Arts. The program will begin at 11:45 a.m. in the Simpson Building, 1291 Conneaut Ave., Bowling Green. Free Feb. 5—The annual Undergraduate Art and Design Exhibition opening reception will be held at 2 p.m. in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries located in the Fine Arts Center. Free Feb. 5—Bowling Green Philharmonia will perform the music of Richard Wagner at 3 p.m. in Kobacker Hall. Featured soloists are tenor Christopher Scholl and Andrew Pelletier, horn. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171 or visit www.bgsu.edu. Advance tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for students and children. All tickets the day of the performance are $10. Through Feb. 20—The annual Undergraduate Art and Design Exhibition will be on display in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are from 11 a.m.­-4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Feb. 7—The Guest Artist Series continues with accordionist Panagiotis Andreoglou. The program will feature his playing of solo works for accordion and electronics. Andreoglou came to BGSU from Greece as a Fulbright scholar. His performances have been broadcast live by the National Dutch Radio and the Greek National Radio and Television. The concert will begin at…


BG to see ‘Good Neighbor Guide’ and community festival plans

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Next week Bowling Green residents will get a sneak peak at the new “Good Neighbor Guide” and plans for a community festival. An open house on the Bowling Green Community Action Plan will be held Tuesday, Feb. 7, from 6 to 8 p.m., in the atrium of the Wood County Courthouse. Citizens will be able to view and comment on the planning concepts for the city’s East Side. Also on view will be the new “Good Neighbor Guide” with descriptions of various community problem issues, permits, penalties and contact information. The open house, guide and festival were discussed Tuesday evening during a joint meeting of Bowling Green City Council and Planning Commission with the representatives of Camiros, who are working on the city’s Community Action Plan. (A story on the zoning discussion at the joint meeting will appear Wednesday on BG Independent News.) Plans for the Court Street Connects Festival will also be on display at the open house next week. The festival, set for April 22, is to create stronger connections from the downtown to Bowling Green State University. The all-day event will be held on the front lawn of the county courthouse. Its purpose is to celebrate the city’s East Side, with historic home tours, safety demonstrations at the fire station and Earth Day events. The Court Street Connects Festival will also serve to test on-street bikeways from BGSU to Prospect Street, along the south side of Court Street. The bikeway will stay in place for the following week. Volunteers are being sought to help with the April 22 event. At next week’s open house, the four draft concepts of the Community Action Plan will also be highlighted: Preservation of historic and green spaces. Activation of park and other community areas. Connection of people in the neighborhoods. Evolution of the East Side of the city.