Campus

BGSU honors staff & faculty for service

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The University expressed appreciation for the dedicated service of faculty, classified and administrative staff at the annual Employee Years of Service Awards March 30, recognizing those with five to 40 years with BGSU. President Mary Ellen Mazey, Provost Rodney Rogers and Chief Human Resources Officer Viva McCarver praised their contributions and the importance of each person’s role in making the University a success. With 40 years of service was library technical assistant Matt Hungling, who has oversight of the Item Record Database — the computerized record of almost every item in the main library. Hungling began working in the library as a student employee and then transitioned to his full-time job in 1976. Over the past 40 years he has seen many changes in the way things are done, from the old Dewey Decimal System for cataloguing materials to today’s Optimal Character Recognition software. Although his work is primarily behind the scenes, his name may be familiar to patrons and researchers as the donor of the Hungling Disney Collection, more than 700 items from his vast collection of books, movies, music and more. Today they reside in the Curriculum Resource Center, where they may be enjoyed by all. Hungling was the first recipient, in 1986, of the Friends of the Libraries Staff Award.


BCI Lab recognized for energy efficient design

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine and Bowling Green State University President Mary Ellen Mazey announced today that the BCI laboratory on the BGSU campus has earned the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver certification. “Opening the new BCI lab at Bowling Green was an exciting milestone. It added the latest technology and increased capacity to help the crime-fighting efforts of Ohio’s law enforcement agencies,” said Attorney General DeWine. “And this certification confirms that this important work is being done in a facility that is environmentally friendly and energy efficient.” “We’re proud to have the BCI facility on our campus for the opportunities it offers our students and faculty, and especially pleased that it reflects our goal of achieving carbon neutrality and being a good environmental role model for the citizens of Ohio,” BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey said. LEED certification comes from the U.S. Green Building Council – a national green building certification program that recognizes best-in-class building strategies and practices. The LEED certification encompasses numerous categories of energy efficiency and environmentally sound design. For example, the BCI lab is expected to be 14 percent more energy efficient than the standard building baseline, thanks to its HVAC and lighting units, in addition to its windows and insulation. Water consumption is estimated to be more than 40 percent below the standard baseline. In building the 30,000-square foot facility, which opened in 2014, more than 20 percent of the materials cost went toward recycled products. At the same time, construction waste was recycled or reused, diverting more than 90 percent of construction waste…


All the Wolfe’s a stage during Bravo! BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The arts programs at Bowling Green State University threw their doors open to give friends and neighbors the chance to peek in. That meant that as Aaron Hynds squeezed chords out of his tuba the strains of gospel-styled Broadway number wafted in from an adjacent theater. This was all part of the aural and visual hubbub of Bravo! BGSU, which was held Saturday night at the Wolfe Center for the Arts on campus. About 150 BGSU students fiddled, danced, sang, painted, posed, drew and otherwise entertained the 275 attendees at the event. Something was going on around every corner and down every hall and byway in the Wolfe Center. Jazz musicians jammed, and a pianist played familiar tunes. Seamstresses were at work, and a crew was busy constructing the rotating set for the Department of Theatre and Film’s next production “Noises Off!” Film was being edited. In its second year, Bravo! BGSU is intended to raise money for arts scholarships. Twice as many tickets were sold this year as last. (On April 6, the university reported the event raised more than $70,000.) President Mary Ellen Mazey said the gala gives those in the community a chance to see just what kind of talent the university attracts. That included 2015 graduate Mariah Burks, a national honoree for her acting, who returned to entertain Saturday. Burks, now studying theater at Case Western Reserve, said she was pleased to be back in her familiar haunts, and playing a role in an effort to help others study here. Steve Hanson, who graduated 40 years earlier than Burks, was…


National Walking Day on April 6

American Heart Association Walking Day is Wednesday, April 6, from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., at the BGSU Perry Field House. Celebrate National Walking Day with BGSU, Wood County Hospital, the City of Bowling Green, and Wood County employees. Lace up your sneakers and improve your odds of living a longer, healthier life by joining us for a Poker Walk! Enjoy a healthful bout of exercise with your colleagues, healthy snacks, raffle prizes, and giveaways. POKER WALK – No prior knowledge of poker is needed to participate. Rather than winning based on skill or speed, the top individuals who collect the best poker hand while walking at the Perry Field House track win great prizes, such as a Fitbit®! The Golden Sneaker Award will be awarded to the employer with the highest percentage of walkers. SPIRIT CONTEST- The participating individual or group (office, colleagues, friends, etc) demonstrating the most enthusiasm and spirit wins a free chair massage (up to one hour) for their office or work area walkers. CELEBRITY WALKERS – Dr. Mary Ellen Mazey, President, Bowling Green State University; Mayor Richard Edwards, City of Bowling Green Mayor; Dr. Sidney Childs, Interim Vice-President, Division of Student Affairs; Dr. Nicholas Espinoza, Director, Falcon Health Center; Dr. Marie Huff, Dean, College of Health and Human Services; Craig LaHote, Doris I. Herringshaw and Joel M. Kuhlman, Wood County Commissioners; Andrew Kalmar, County Administrator; Stan Korducki President, Wood County Hospital; Lori Tretter, Municipal Administrator; Monica Moll, BGSU Chief of Police/Director of Public Safety; Viva McCarver, Chief Human Resources Officer.


BGSU grad Steve Hanson has stories to tell about the art & business of making “The Prophet”

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Steve Hanson returns to Bowling Green State University, he will have stories to tell about telling stories. His story as a multimedia entrepreneur starts with his time at BGSU. “Bowling Green taught me how to think, how to tell a story,” the 1975 graduate said in a recent telephone interview. As a photojournalism major that education included late night calls from Professor Jim Gordon. Hanson, then photo editor of the Key, lived with Joe Darwal, then photo editor of The BG News. When Gordon called it wasn’t just to say hello, it was usually to deliver blunt critiques of their most recent work. “It is that kind of mentoring that takes us to a different level,” he said. Hanson will participate in Bravo! BGSU Saturday in the Wolfe Center for the Arts Saturday from 7 to 10 p.m. For tickets, call 419-372-6780. He’ll show excerpts from the film “The Prophet,” which he produced, from 7:30 to 8 in the Donnell Theatre. (See related story: http://bgindependentmedia.org/2016/03/25/bgsu-putting-on-the-glitz-to-raise-money-for-arts-scholarships/) Then on Sunday he’ll kick off the university’s E-Week activities with a screening of “The Prophet” at 8 p.m., also in the Donnell. On Monday, he’ll discuss the making of the film at a Lunch and Learn session from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in The David J. Joseph Company Business Hub on the second floor of the College of Business. The first stirrings of the film began back in his undergraduate days. That’s when he read Lebanese writer Kahlil Gibran’s inspirational book “The Prophet.” It was a time of great turmoil,” Hanson said, and as a photojournalist he…


BGSU College of Business hosts event on digital entrepreneurship

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The Sebo Series in Entrepreneurship continues to bring innovative and current entrepreneurial leaders to Bowling Green State University. This year’s event on April 8 will feature keynote presenter Dr. John Kelly, who oversees Watson, the IBM supercomputer that answers questions using artificial intelligence to accept and process natural language requests. The Sebo Series will take place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Lenhart Grand Ballroom of the Bowen-Thompson Student Union on campus with Kelly’s talk scheduled for 12:15 p.m. For details visit: https://www.bgsu.edu/business/centers-and-institutes/dallas-hamilton-center-for-entrepreneurial-leadership/e-week/sebo-series-in-entrepreneurship.html Watson wowed the public during its “Jeopardy!” debut when it defeated two of the game show’s top champions. Watson learns about subjects and automatically updates as new information is published, which made its “Jeopardy!” appearance a day-by-day process in which the supercomputer became increasingly better each day as it learned more about the game and subjects. Kelly is the senior vice president at IBM and his top priority is to stimulate innovation in key areas of information technology and to bring those innovations to the marketplace quickly, to apply these innovations to help IBM clients succeed, and to identify and nurture new and future areas for investment and growth. Other featured presenters include William Amurgis, intranet and internal communications specialist; Mark Hosbein, managing director at Accenture; Lisa Mitnick, managing director at Accenture Digital; and Dr. Gene Poor, Hamilton Professor of Entrepreneurship at BGSU. The event will be at the Lenhart Grand Ballroom of the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Reception and networking begins at 8:30 a.m., with the welcome at 9 a.m.Kelly will be the afternoon keynote speaker.  


BGSU Students ‘Hatch’ entrepreneurial ideas

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS In the spirit of “Shark Tank,” 11 student entrepreneurs will pitch their business ideas to alumni investors during The Hatch on April 7 at Bowling Green State University. The event will begin at 6 p.m. in the Lenhart Grand Ballroom at the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. In 2015, The Hatch attracted more than 3,500 attendees and was streamed to watch parties across the United States. “Hatchlings” are paired with alumni mentors throughout the spring semester to develop their business ideas. Participating students and their ideas include: Alyssa Batch, a senior majoring in graphic design, is creating personal comforters for dementia patients to create a conversation between nurses, aids, residents and visitors. Austin Farrington, a senior majoring in marketing, is developing a system that utilizes Bluetooth beacons to set up a “GeoFence” that will help pinpoint the location of individuals who are wearing a Bluetooth bracelet or ID badge in a facility. Collin Newton and Kiersten Castner, both sophomores majoring in marketing and business analytics, are developing a “smart wallet” phone case that will keep track of the customer’s cards. Jarrod Cain, a senior majoring in finance, business analytics and intelligence, and management information systems, is creating a scheduling application that matches students to professors based on course structure. Khory Katz and Meredith Moore, both sophomores majoring in finance and sales and services marketing, are developing an idea of “no-hassle lofted beds,” an easy to use lofting system to transform a small, cramped dorm room into a more functional space. Ryan Murphy, a sophomore, and Baqer Aljabr a senior, are both majoring in engineering technology…


Scholar puts feminist spin on issues of sports & fitness

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Scholar Pirkko Markula’s talk Monday at Bowling Green State University on “Women’s Empowerment Through Sport and Exercise: Rhetoric or Reality?” revolved around pole dancing, or pole fitness, as it has come to be called. The exercise, popularized in strip clubs, has become a popular form of fitness training for women. Markula opened her talk with positive comments about the activity by one of her students and testimonials from those who participate in pole workouts. The student reported that it helped build her self-confidence as someone who had “overwhelming dissatisfaction with my own body.” This led Markula, who is a professor at the University of Alberta, to wonder: “Pole fitness may be an avenue by which women can develop and maintain positive body image as a result of an environment that emphasizes body acceptance and the body’s abilities.” Still the exercise, with its emphasis on shaping the woman’s body in a stereotypical form that appeals to men, is problematic. At the conclusion of the lecture, Leda Hayes, a graduate student in American Culture Studies, asked the speaker if the popularity of pole fitness could lessen the stigma on those working in the sex industry. Markula said she, contrary to what some believe, considers the sex industry harmful to women, and she wondered why women would choose the particular form of exercise to do. There are other forms of pole exercise, including one practiced in China, that are not sexualized and provide the same benefits. Pole fitness, like female sports and fitness in general, is fraught with issues about social expectations and norms, about empowerment and…


Students to clean up reputations and neighborhoods at same time

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   BGSU students often get trashed for not being good neighbors to full-time city residents. In an effort to clean up their reputations and their neighborhoods at the same time, an Adopt a Block program is being started with the help of the City-University Relations Commission. Danielle Parker, vice president of the Undergraduate Student Government at Bowling Green State University, said the program will help students connect with the community. “This is a new and exciting way for students to give back, besides dropping off some canned goods and walking away,” Parker said. The program will work somewhat like the larger scale “Adopt a Highway” effort. Ten “blocks” have been established by the City-University Relations Commission. Student groups will be asked to adopt an area then head out once a month and pick up trash in the medians. The trash will then be disposed of in the dumpsters behind the city fire station and electric division on Thurstin and Court streets. The 10 “blocks” up for adoption are: North Enterprise from East Wooster to Frazee Avenue. North Summit from East Wooster to Frazee Avenue. North Prospect from East Wooster to Frazee Avenue. East Court Street from North Prospect to Thurstin Avenue. Pike Street from North Prospect to Thurstin Avenue. Ridge Street from North Prospect to Thurstin Avenue. Merry Street from North Prospect to Thurstin Avenue. Reed Street from North Prospect to Thurstin Avenue. Area bordered by Wooster, Biddle, Clough and South College. Area bordered by Wooster, South Enterprise, Clough and South Prospect. “Students will go out and take care of that block,” Parker…


BGSU plans to get down with Earth Month activities

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS BGSU is mobilizing the community to get involved with sustainability efforts and issues during April. A full slate of Earth Month events and activities has been planned to raise awareness about and combat the effects of global climate change. Organized by the Office of Campus Sustainability, all the events are free and open to the public. Visit the website for full details. http://www.bgsu.edu/campus-sustainability/earth-month.html In 2015, the University adopted its Climate Action Plan to help meet its goal of being a carbon-neutral institution by 2040 as part of the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment. Students have been active participants in BGSU’s environmental efforts. Among them, the student-led Green Initiatives Fund  provides a pool of money for projects that enhance sustainability at BGSU. In honor of Earth Month, the Environmental Service Club invites others to join its “Adopt-a-Highway Earth Month Edition” on April 16. To learn more about the issues surrounding climate change, the community is invited to attend a guest lecture by Dr. Henry Pollack, a professor emeritus of geophysics at the University of Michigan. He will be presenting a blend of climate science and policy in a talk entitled “Good COP, Bad COP: The Paris Climate Accord,” at 7 p.m. April 18 in the Bowen-Thompson Student Union Theater. Pollack will share his research on how to move forward with public policy even though there is scientific uncertainty. A highlight of the month is always the annual Eco-Fair, on Earth Day, April 20. The fair runs from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Union Oval and features environmental organizations, groups and initiatives from…


Gloria Gajewicz honored for home grown science teaching skills

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green teacher Gloria Gajewicz was inspired through her career by her own teachers, and further by her mother’s pursuit of education. So it is fitting that she should receive an award named for the late Neil Pohlmann, an educator and BGSU professor who left his mark on science education. Earlier this month Gajewicz won the first Neil Pohlman Award given by Bowling Green State University at the spring conference of the Northwest Ohio School Boards Association meeting. Patrick Pauken, director of the School of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Policy, said the award “is given in recognition of valuable contribution to Educational Administration and Leadership Studies at BGSU.” Gajewicz is working on her doctorate in the program. The award carries a scholarship. Pauken wrote: “The faculty selected Gloria for the award because of her endless dedication to teaching, learning, and leading in our schools. She is an excellent graduate student, as well, inspiring her classmates with her professional stories of student success. Our classrooms and schools are special places, indeed, with teachers and leaders like Gloria Gajewicz.” Gajewicz has taught science for 20 years, the last 16 at her alma mater, Bowling Green High School where she teaches biology and honors physical science. Finishing her second semester of what she expects will be a four-year process, Gajewicz’s goal is to become a curriculum specialist with her particular interest in science. She said she was inspired to pursue science by the many great science teachers she had in the Bowling Green system. That included Roger Mazzarella, “the wizard of Mazz,” in seventh grade and Bob Rex in…


BGSU administration, union announce contract agreement

The administration and faculty union have just issued this joint statement: March 30, 2016 Dear Colleagues, We are pleased to share that the University and the BGSU Faculty Association- AAUP have completed negotiations on our second collective bargaining agreement which, when ratified by both BGSU-FA members and the BGSU Board of Trustees, will cover July 1, 2016, through June 30, 2019. As shared in previous joint communications on the bargaining process, both the University and BGSU-FA are committed to producing a fair contract that supports the broader mission of excellence in teaching, research, and service at BGSU. Both teams worked collaboratively and in good faith over the past year to achieve this goal. We elected to use the Interest-Based Bargaining (IBB) approach, which allowed us to reach joint solutions on recommended changes to this proposed successor collective bargaining agreement that met the interests of both parties. The IBB approach allowed us to work collegially to find creative consensus solutions that addressed the issues each party hoped to address. The proposed 2016-2019 Collective Bargaining Agreement between Bowling Green State University and the BGSU-FA will be distributed shortly. The timeline for both parties is to conduct the ratification vote by BGSU-FA members the week of April 18-22; assuming ratification, the Collective Bargaining Agreement would be submitted to the BGSU Board of Trustees for their review and approval at the May 6, 2016, meeting. We extend our thanks to members of both bargaining teams for their hard work over the past year to bring us this proposed contract that we both believe will help us to continue building stronger relations between the University…


BGSU Lively Arts calendar through April 13

Through April 3—The BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries at BGSU’s Fine Arts Center, and will run through April 3. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free March 30—The Guest Artists series continues with pianists Gulimina Mahamuti and Frank Chiou. The performance begins at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 31—The College of Musical Arts presents a Student Composers Forum, beginning at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 31—The International Film Series continues with the 2014 Russian film ”Leviafan (Leviathan).” Director Andrei Zviagintsev has defended his film as an eternal story against those who saw in it pointed criticism of Russian society. The film follows a family living in a small coastal town in the Murmansk region who confront the mayor, who is trying to take their land and small business. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 2—Bravo! BGSU, a black-tie optional gala, showcases the best of BGSU arts students and faculty. Performances, exhibits, readings and other activities take place throughout the Wolfe Center for the Arts from 7- 10 p.m. Sponsored by PNC, the even raises funds for arts student scholarships. Tickets are $100 per person and are available by contacting the Office of the President at 419-372-6780 or by emailing lmattia@bgsu.edu. For more information, visit bgsu.edu/bravo. April 3—The Sunday Matinee Series continues with “Soundies, Snaders, and Scopitones…


BGSU Lively Arts Calendar, through April 6

Through April 3—The BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries at BGSU’s Fine Arts Center, and will run through April 3. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free March 29—Viola students of Matthew Daline will perform at the Manor House located at Wildwood Metropark, 5100 W. Central Ave., Toledo. The performance begins at 7:30 p.m. Free March 29 —Tuesdays at the Gish series ends this semester with “Girl, Interrupted” (1999). Director James Mangold’s film follows young Susanna, who gets checked into a psychiatric hospital, where she begins to find herself among new friends and enemies. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free March 29—College of Musical Arts students of tuba and euphonium will perform under the direction of David Saltzmann. The recital begins at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 30—The Guest Artists series continues with pianists Gulimina Mahamuti and Frank Chiou. The performance begins at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 31—The College of Musical Arts presents a Student Composers Forum, beginning at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 31—The International Film Series continues with the 2014 Russian film ”Leviafan (Leviathan).” Director Andrei Zviagintsev has defended his film as an eternal story against those who saw in it pointed criticism of Russian society. The film follows a family living in a small coastal…


Common Good benefit celebrates diversity within community

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Common Good of the UCF is what those it serves make of it. The house at 113 Crim St. is the vortex of activities aimed at bettering the lives of people, and the community they live in. That can involve picking up the exterior spaces with neighborhood cleanups, or it can mean the clearing of interior spaces through meditation. That can mean growing sustenance for the body at two community gardens and a food pantry, or providing sustenance for the mind through discussions about spirituality and current event. And at dinner dialogues those two missions meet. The Common Good of the UCF embraces this broad mission because that’s what people have told them their needs are. The organization’s own needs are simple, but real. On Thursday, April 7, at 6:30 p.m. the Common Good will present “Expressions of Arthenticity,” at the Clazel, 127 N. Main St., Bowling Green. Tickets are $25 and $15 with a student identification. One beverage and a dessert bar come with admission. The show includes a fashion show, live jazz and an auction. Tickets are available at Common Good and Grounds for Thought, 174 S. Main St., or by calling 513-314-4489. Caroline Dawson, the financial developer for Common Good, said that the fashion show, which will start at 7:30p.m., will feature clothing from local boutiques and hair and makeup by local salons. The models will be of all ages, body types and ethnicities. That reflects the philosophy of the Common Good, she said. “We offer diversity here and embrace diversity.” Those who participate range in age from kids in…