Campus

BGSU student, Eric Ward, dies

A Bowling Green State University freshman, Eric Ward, died unexpectedly Monday at his home in Castalia, Ohio. The 20-year-old was an  aviation studies major, according to an announcement from the BGSU Office of Vice President for Student Affairs and Vice Provost. 
 He began his studies at BGSU in the spring 2016 semester and was to have continued this fall, commuting from home. He was also a private first class with the Ohio National Guard’s Bravo Company, 237th Brigade Support Battalion, out of Youngstown. According to an online obituary a Celebration of Life will be held from 2-5 p.m.  Saturday, Aug. 27 in the Ransom Funeral and Cremation Service 610 S. Washington St. Castalia. In lieu of flowers memorials may be made to Teen Leadership Corps 12984 Ridge Creek Strongsville OH 44136 or the Seker Fund of EHOVE 316 W. Mason Rd. Milan OH 44846. The full obituary can be viewed at: http://www.ransomfuneralhome.com/notices/Eric-Ward Condolences can be sent to the family through sympathy@bgsu.edu. Counselors are available to help the campus community cope with this loss. The BGSU Counseling Center is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday-Friday, or can be reached by phone at 419-372-2081.


Renovations bring new life to the heart of the BGSU campus

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News To get a good view of the future of Bowling Green State University, all you have to do is arrange a tour of two of its oldest buildings. That will require donning a hard hat since University Hall, which opened in 1915 and Moseley Hall, which opened in 1916, are both construction sites. And it takes a little imagination to see what the future holds in the haze of dust, walls stripped to bare stone, metal girders and even gaping empty sections. Still a year from now, these buildings will welcome students, and prospective students, to their lives as Falcons. Brian Swope, assistant director of office of construction and design, said it was an honor to be involved in turning some of “the university’s iconic structures” into “dynamic and innovative educational spaces.” Among those at work on the projects are a number of graduates from BGSU’s construction management program. That desire to blend the new and the old means preserving some signature features. The marble staircase in University Hall will be refurbished. And the building will get a new entry on the east side with a facade that will be in the style of the existing façade. University Hall will house the admissions office on the second floor. What was the front of the Eva Marie Saint Theatre will be turned into a large presentation space for admissions, said Steve Krakoff, vice president, capital planning and campus operations. The lower floors will house a number…


University Women to hold Fall Membership Brunch

(As submitted by the University Women of BGSU) The University Women of Bowling Green State University will open their 2016-2017 year with the annual Fall Membership Brunch. The event will be held on Saturday, Aug. 27 at 10 a.m. in the Simpson Building at Simpson Garden Park in Bowling Green. It is open to the public, with area women interested in joining the organization invited to come as guests. Current members each bring a dish for the potluck brunch. During the brunch, BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey will update members and guests on what is new at BGSU. The morning’s program will be presented by Julie Rubini, author, founder of Claire’s Day, and a Maumee City Councilwoman. Rubini will speak about her own book “Missing Millie Benson.” Writing under the pseudonym of Carolyn Keene, northwest Ohioan Millie Benson wrote 23 of the first 30 books in the vastly popular Nancy Drew Mystery series for girls. Claire’s Day was created in memory of Rubini’s daughter, Claire, who died in 2000 at age 10 as a result of a heart condition. Reflecting Claire’s love of reading, dancing and art, Claire’s Day currently partners with Read for Literacy, dedicated to inspiring children and families to be lifelong readers through exposure to a variety of literary experiences. Among these is Claire’s Day Children’s Book Festival, northwest Ohio’s largest free family book festival. Also during Saturday’s fall brunch the organization will hold its annual raffle and silent auction, which last year raised $1,000 to help with school supplies for families in need in the five Bowling Green public…


Mayor and Mazey ask BGSU students to behave

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Still in her pajama shorts at 1:30 Friday afternoon, Lacy Hoening wasn’t expecting the mayor and university president to come knocking on her front door. “I saw you coming down the street and said, ‘the president’s coming,’” Hoening said as she welcomed to her front porch BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey, Mayor Dick Edwards and Vice President of Student Affairs and Vice Provost Thomas Gibson. “We just want everyone to be on their good behavior,” Mazey told Hoening. They chatted about classes and hometowns, shared hugs and handshakes. One house down, many more to go. The door-to-door visits by the mayor, university president and vice provost were not just to welcome new students. They were to establish some expectations – especially for those students living on East Wooster Street, the front door to the city. “When I first came to BG, there were signs put up,” Mazey recalled. While some students found them funny, many parents dropping out their students for the new school year failed to find the humor. One huge sign stated, “Daddy drop your daughters off here. They’ll be in good hands.” “That’s not something we want to be known for,” Mazey said. So she and the mayor teamed up and started their annual meet and greets along Wooster Street. “The last two years, it’s really improved,” Mazey said. “I think it’s helped.” On Friday afternoon, they put on their walking shoes again and went knocking on doors. After…



BGSU welcomes new & returning students

From BGSU MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The 2016-167 academic year that begins Monday (Aug. 22) is already off to a strong start. The University today welcomes an incoming freshman class that is about 6 percent larger than last year’s, more diverse and with the highest average GPA in University history. BGSU expects close to 3,600 new freshmen on opening day, up from 3,405 in fall 2015, said Cecilia Castellano, vice provost for strategic enrollment planning. About 20 percent of this year’s freshman class comes from diverse backgrounds, and the class overall has seen growth of 8 percent in multicultural students compared to last year, including 27 percent more Latino students. Ohio is still the primary recruitment area for the University, Castellano said, but 15 percent of the new freshmen are from other states. The freshman class boasts a BGSU record-breaking 3.4 GPA. ACT scores of the incoming class match last year’s 22.6. Twenty-three percent of BGSU freshmen reported on their FAFSA applications that they are first-generation college students. New and returning students will be greeted by some outstanding new facilities. The School of Media and Communication moves into its new home, which also has a new name. The former South Hall has been rechristened the Michael and Sara Kuhlin  Center in honor of major funding from the alumni couple. The cutting-edge facility features two state-of-the-art audio and video production studios, a media convergence lab uniting all the Falcon media plus active-learning classrooms. The center will allow students to learn in settings mirroring…


BG Community Center to close for maintenance week

The Bowling Green Community Center will be closed to facility users during the week of Aug. 22-26 for its annual shut-down week for maintenance. The front desk will still remain open on a limited basis from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. to accept and process program registrations, rental reservations and payments, and other related business transactions. During this time, BG Community Center passholders are able to use the BGSU Student Recreation Center as part of a reciprocal agreement. Community Center members may pick up a temporary BGSU parking permit from the community center front desk and are to park in lots 10 (Ice Arena) or 18 (Perry Field House) and are required to display a BGSU parking permit on driver’s side dashboard at all times or are subject to parking fines. Paid parking is available for lot X (across from the Ice Arena). Lot X parking tickets are purchased from the kiosk located within the lot. Valid BG Community Center passes are required to enter. During the first visit, waivers must be signed at entry. BGSU Recreation and Wellness recommends one parent/guardian for every four children using the facility. Same room supervision is required for children under 16. No day care facilities are available. The BG Community Center will reopen for use on Saturday, Aug. 27.


New home for media and communications the talk of BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG INDEPENDENT NEWS South Hall was an eyesore; the Kuhlin Center is a gem. Some people scoffed at the idea that South Hall with its facade pimpled with window air conditioning units should be renovated. Now three years later the new home for Bowling Green State University’s School of Communications and Media Studies including a new wing housing a suite of studios is ready to educate a new generation of professionals. About two weeks before the first day of classes, construction workers are still putting finishing touches on the $24 million project even as faculty and staff begin to move in. “These projects tend to go down to the wire,” said Steve Krakoff. “This one is no different.” Krakoff, vice president, capital planning and campus operations, was a prominent advocate for renovating rather than razing the former South Hall. It had good bones, he said. Now he and John Fischer, vice provost for academic affairs, and Brian Swope, assistant director of office of construction and design, three administrators closest to developing the project, are walking the halls of the nearly finished Kuhlin Center. The School of Media and Communication includes three departments: Communications, Media Production and Studies, and Journalism and Public Relations. Even for those who were familiar with the building’s previous iterations it can be hard to identify its features. What was a dank theater space on the fourth floor is now a conference room. The Kuhlin Center, Fischer said, will have “the nicest conference spaces…



New Greek Village creates common ground for BGSU’s sororities and fraternities

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The new houses for Greeks on the Bowling Green State University campus generated smiles from visitors, especially those looking forward to moving in a few days. While the amenities, large bedrooms, kitchens, and open spaces drew raves, it was the sense of togetherness the place would foster that seemed to most warm the hearts of future residents. Delaney Poor, a sister of Delta Gamma, said having the sorority back in its own house will mean “you always have a support system. There will always be someone here for you.” Her Delta Gamma sister Lauren Gillespie said it will allow them “to share their sisterhood in a special place.” One of the features of the new townhouse-style houses is each will have a chapter room, a place big enough to gather all the members of the chapter, including the majority not living in the house, into one place for meetings. Alyssa Karaffa, a 2010 BGSU graduate and member of Alpha Delta Xi, said in the past the larger chapters would have to use several rooms to hold meetings. “We won’t be scattered across campus anymore,” said Molly Post, who will live in the Omega Phi Alpha house. Greeks were given space in Kohl Hall after the old houses were torn down. “It will give us a chance to have a home place to gather have more a sense of sisterhood,” Post said. And, she added, the complex with its uniform look will serve another purpose, to…


Optimal Aging keynote speaker says we must take getting older into our own hands

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In my many years of covering speeches, I have never jumped up onto the speaker’s back. But in his Optimal Aging Community Fair keynote address Colin Milner, the CEO of the International Council on Active Aging, said we must continue to try new things even as we get older. So when asked for a volunteer – a male volunteer from a crowd that was predominantly female, I raised my hand. The woman sitting next to me made sure he saw it. Milner brought me on stage in Bowling Green State University’s Grand Ballroom. After a few tries – I’m 62 and not as agile as I once was – I bounded awkwardly onto his back. And with my stocky frame astride his stocky frame, he started asking the audience questions. How easy with me on his back would it be for him to climb stairs? Or play with his grandchildren?  Would he be able to catch himself if started to fall? “This is what being inactive looks like,” he said. “Taking David off is what being active looks like. Keeping our  strength as we get older, keeping our power, keeping our agility,  so that at the end of our life … we compress morbidity so that actually are spending as much of our life in optimal health as possible.” Milner said: “Between the ages 35-70, we begin to lose our function. … If we are inactive it continues to decline throughout our life. But…


BG community nudged toward more inclusiveness

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Crowding around the tables at the library Thursday were people of white privilege, people of color, and people who love who they choose to. At one table in the back of the room were four people of different backgrounds with one common link – discomfort and discrimination in Bowling Green. Ayanna Byers, a BGSU graduate student from Pittsburgh, had been in the city for less than three weeks. Longtime Bowling Green residents were telling her about a nearby community, when Byers asked if it was a “sundown town.” The white women at the table didn’t understand, until Byers explained. “It’s a town where if you’re a person of color you shouldn’t be there after sundown.” As a black woman, Byers said she is accustomed to being followed around stores by shop employees. “I’m so used to things happening,” she said, so sometimes she doesn’t even realize it at first. She has only ventured off campus twice since arriving in the city, the first time to an ice cream shop. She was standing at the counter to order, when a white woman and her children pushed in front of her. “It still happens,” Byers said. Sometimes it’s subtle, and impossible to prove. “But you feel it in your gut,” said another person at the table, Krishna Han, who is from Cambodia. “I never knew racism till I came to this country,” said Han, whose skin is brown and who speaks English as his…


Chartwells honors Paulus for dining service at BGSU

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS As Napoleon famously said, “An army marches on its stomach.” Translate that to a university setting, where thousands of students – plus faculty, staff and visitors – must be fed every day in order to keep them functioning at their best. But unlike an army, whose soldiers must eat what they are given, university dining services must be responsive and provide an array of menus to meet an array of tastes and needs. Luckily for BGSU, Dining Director Michael Paulus understands that imperative and is adept at serving up a satisfying experience for his many clients. Paulus works with Chartwells http://www.dineoncampus.com/bgsu/idx.cfm?, a division of Compass Group, which provides dining services for more than 210 colleges and universities around the country, including BGSU. In recognition of his service, Paulus was recently presented the Presidents Circle Award by Chartwells for outstanding achievement in the “Community Pillar” category, which signifies “taking our lead from our guests,” according to Chartwells Regional Vice President Kevin Lyden. Paulus was honored at the company’s annual summit in Chicago. He was among those receiving awards for “Living the Brand Pillars,” which also include cuisine, culture, ideas and people. “Michael was nominated for his award for his work with the BGSU community, his ability to listen to our guests, satisfy their needs, and deliver a ‘WOW’ experience with every meal served,” Lyden said. “Because BGSU students are highly concerned about our planet, the BGSU team has adopted many successful sustainability programs. Parents have…



Optimal Aging panel gets personal about facing challenges

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Optimal Aging Community Fair was all about getting older while remaining healthy in body and mind. Monday’s fair was the first major public event for Bowling Green State University’s newly launched Optimal Aging Institute. For luncheon speakers the event, the Wood County Committee on Aging put together of panel of local residents who have faced the kind of challenges people encounter as they age. Denise Niese, executive director of the committee, said it was not hard to single out those selected. Nancy Wright, Tim Tegge and Dr. Richard Barker are all well known in the community and have bounced back from challenges that would set others back on their heels. A video of Nora Liu, a retired university women’s basketball coach, was also shown.  Though in assisted living herself, she continues to lead exercise classes. Wright, of Grand Rapids, helped her husband run a funeral home and is a very active community volunteer. Her moment of truth came on Feb. 11, 1993, when she wasn’t feeling well and had her husband bring her to the emergency room at Wood County Hospital. There the emergency room doctor missed the signs of a heart attack because no one expects a 50-year-old woman to have a heart attack. The error was caught. She received the proper treatment. Wright not only lived to tell about it, but to preach about her experience, especially to women who may mistakenly think they are not at risk of a heart…