Campus

Therapy dogs ease BGSU students into finals week

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University students arriving at Jerome Library to study for finals Monday were in for a surprise. On the first floor they were greeted by a crowd of their fellow students, displaying behavior decidedly uncharacteristic for finals week. They were chattering, smiling, laughing even, and mixed in was an occasional bark. For Margaret Weinberger’s freshman seminar class that meant this part of their final project was a success. On Monday afternoon, the local chapter of Therapy Dogs International brought six dogs to Jerome Library as a stress reliever for students. The visit by the dogs was the second arranged by the students in the freshman seminar “Animals in Human Lives.” The students petted and talked to the dogs, who were fitted out in seasonal attire. Some students snapped photos, while some just stood back and enjoyed the scene. “I have a dog back home,” said sophomore Samantha Foster, “and I miss him like crazy.” Sarah Miller also has a dog at home, and she was “very excited” when she arrived with friends to study to see the therapy dogs. They definitely relieve the stress, she said. “I just really like animals.” “Dogs are so happy all the time,” said Megan Forsthoefel, one of the students in the seminar. “Just the act of petting a dog is calming.” That’s the opposite of studying for exams. Studies have shown dogs can lower blood pressure as well as other physical and mental benefits. Allie Rodenbucher said she talked with another student who was studying upstairs in the library when she heard a dog bark. “I was so stressed out. It was perfect,” the student told Rodenbucher. The idea for the therapy dogs came up on the ride back from a field trip to a correctional center in Toledo where inmates help raise dogs as service animals as well as rehabilitate racing greyhounds, Rodenbucher said. That visit confirmed the therapeutic effect of dogs, she said. “We were all puppy struck.” Weinberger said the library seemed a good location. This is not the first time therapy dogs have been invited into Jerome, she said, crediting the library faculty and staff with being so welcoming. Weinberger said professors are encouraged to develop BGSU 1910 seminars on topics they are passionate about, and Weinberger is passionate about animals. That was shared by many of her students. “I thought it’d be perfect,” Shaylyn Westfall said, of her decision to enroll in the seminar. The seminar also made field trips to the Toledo Zoo, where they ventured behind the scenes, and to the Weber Ranch in Wayne, where they saw the sustainable pig operation. Student Jonah Robinson said he was interested in the sociological aspects of the course. Standing back he witnessed that canine-human dynamic unfold. The dogs were definitely taking…


Community lifts voices in First Presbyterian “Messiah” sing-along

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The season’s first snowstorm couldn’t stop music lovers from gathering Sunday to sing-along to holiday music for the ages. A sing-along performance of G. F. Handel’s “Messiah” drew a few dozen to the First Presbyterian Church to listen and sing-along on the choruses. They were joined by the church’s chancel choir, soloists, organ and an 11-piece orchestra. Inside they all found the warmth of the festive atmosphere, and beloved strains of music. As musicologist Christopher Williams, who was singing in the choir, noted in his introductory remarks, “Messiah” is associated with both the Christmas and Easter season. That means its strains, especially the climatic “Hallelujah” chorus, are familiar both to listeners and to singers. The sing-along is intended to bring those two groups together in a spirit of harmony and in literal harmony. The Rev. Gary Saunders, the church’s co-pastor, said that the event fit well into the church’s belief in fostering community and creativity. Josh Wang, the church’s choir director, credited co-pastor Mary Jane Saunders with first suggesting the church stage the performance. She had attended such performances in the past and felt it would work in Bowling Green. Wang, in his first year in his position, was already contemplating a program for the Christmas season, and this fit the bill. “It’s so popular, really beloved music,” he said. So many people have sung it and having them sing the choruses “makes it a more meaningful experience for everyone.” Also, the sing-along makes the event more casual than the usual concert presentation. Not that the soloists, choir and orchestra were casual about preparation. “It was wonderful to be part of something this big,” said Nancy Hess, a member of choir. She enjoyed the challenge of preparing the music. “Obviously we strive for accuracy, and as good a performance as we can,” Wang said. The performance included almost all of the oratorio’s first section, and “The Trumpet Will Sound” and the “Hallelujah” chorus from the final section. Among the soloists was professional singer Diane McEwen-Martin, whose families has long ties to the church. “I was baptized here.” She sang the mezzo-soprano solos. She has performed “Messiah” before, but not all that many times. She explained that she started her career as a mezzo-soprano before shifting up the vocal register to soprano. Her voice, she said is not suited to the high florid soprano lines in “Messiah,” but people forgot she still had a lower register, so she didn’t get that many opportunities to perform the oratorio. McEwen-Martin was happy to be back singing the familiar mezzo-soprano solos, as well as “But Who May Abide the Day of His Coming,” an aria for bass that is frequently sung by a mezzo. This was her first opportunity to sing the solo, McEwen said. The other soloists…


Yemeni family fought to make it to U.S….now worried if they are safe here

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Mohammed Al-Dailami gave up his career and all his possessions to get his family out of war-torn Yemen. Now he worries that he has brought his wife and children to a country where they are not wanted. Al-Dailami, who created a language center and taught English in his homeland of Yemen, was one of 19 teachers selected from around the world to be part of the Teaching Excellence and Achievement program at BGSU in 2014. It was that visit to Bowling Green that convinced him that this would be a good place for his family. It also convinced BGSU that Al-Dailami would be a good fit for the English as a second language program here. So Al-Dailami was asked to teach and take classes here starting in the fall of 2015. It seemed like a perfect way to continue his education and to get his family out of Yemen, where bombings by nearby Saudi Arabia were making life very difficult. “The situation has gotten worse and worse,” Al-Dailami said. Saudi Arabia is bombing everything, “from humans and rocks, as they say in my country.” The American Embassy was shuttered, the airport in the capital city of Sanaa was destroyed and the seaport was closed. “They tried to destroy anything vital to the people.” There are no jobs, no electricity, no water and almost no gas. Al-Dailami had to wait three days each time he needed gas. “Life had stopped,” he said. “The middle class had become poor.” Despite peace talks, the bombings by Saudi Arabia forces continued. “We have a lot of oil in our country. They don’t want us to find it,” Al-Dailami said. “They are killing us.” But now that Al-Dailami, his wife (an Arabic language teacher in Yemen) and three daughters (ages 10, 6 and 3) are safely in the U.S., he worries about the hatred stirred by President-elect Donald Trump toward Muslims from other lands. “I don’t know what makes people hate so much,” Al-Dailami said. “I am a human being.” He fears Trump’s characterization of Muslims as terrorists. “My life, my wife and my kids are in danger again,” he said. “I hope that this is not true.” That is a tough realization, considering Al-Dailami and his family gave up everything they had worked for in Yemen to come to America. He remembers nearly every detail of the horrific journey his family endured to reach Bowling Green. Al-Dailami was told that when the Sanaa airport was repaired for flights, he would need to act quickly, leave everything behind, and be willing to spend his life’s savings on the journey. “You need to prepare yourself and your family in one night,” he said he was told. “It was the matter of saving the life of my family.” When…


BGSU students musical mastery on display in 50th Competition in Musical performance

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When musicians stepped onto the stage of Kobacker Hall late last week to perform in the annual Competition in Musical Performance, there was not much of an audience. A panel of five judges from outside BGSU sat in the center of the hall. Maybe a few more people, friends and fellow musicians, sat toward the back. The stage was starkly lit, and the only company performers had on stage was an accompanist and maybe a page turner for the accompanist. The performers themselves had no pages to turn, no sheets of music to hide behind. They and their practicing over the past few months stood exposed. Every year for the last 50 years, Bowling Green State University undergraduate and graduate students have stepped forward to exhibit their musical mastery. This year 69 student musicians competed for four awards, two each for undergraduate and graduate. They performed Wednesday through Friday with eight finalists returning on Saturday. “This is definitely the ultimate test of everything they need to achieve artistically,” said Nermis Mieses, BGSU professor of oboe who coordinated this year’s event. Each undergraduate performer must play up to 15 minutes of music for their instrument or voice and band or orchestra.  Each graduate student can play up to 20 minutes. The music must be memorized. The competition is open to all instrumentalists and vocalists. This tests the student’s discipline and artistry, as well as “how they handle themselves when they are performing,” Mieses said. Saxophonist Piyaphon Asawakarnjanakit said the most important thing about a competition is it forces the musician “to work more and more.” The first-year graduate student from Thailand said he knew he would participate as soon as he heard about the competition. After his Thursday afternoon performance he conceded he made a few mistakes, still “I’m happy to play my music.” Flutist Aldulfulyne Padmore, another first-year graduate student, came away happy with her performance. “I think I did very well,” she said. “It’s the best I’ve played the piece.” She said she decided to play the concerto by Otar Gordelli because she had studied it before.  She knew she wanted to participate in the competition as a way of adjusting to the greater demands of graduate study. Using a familiar piece allowed her to focus on the nuances and musicality more than just the notes. And Padmore likes the concerto because it alternates between “schmaltzy” passages and jazzy passages that sound like Gershwin. Her teacher Conor Nelson interjected that Padmore achieved such a high level of performance while working 27 hours a week for food service at the university. Nelson said the competition is “an incredible opportunity for students to have feedback from outside judges.” He said “it forces you to prepare in all sorts of new ways and potentially can lead…


BGSU trustees approved software engineering major

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University hopes a new software engineering major will compute with new students. The University Board of Trustees approved the new major Friday. The new major will equip students to enter an expanding job field. When the measure was considered by Faculty Senate, Professor Robert Dyer said that the openings were growing by 17 percent a year. In introducing the new major, Provost Rodney Rogers said it aligned with areas of strength that already exist within the university. President Mary Ellen Mazey said it also fills a niche. When talking with prospective students about what they’d like to see at BGSU, engineering is the top request. Now, BGSU will have a software engineering program as part of its offerings. The Department of Computer Science, which is within the College of Arts and Sciences, already has a specialization in software engineering that was established two years ago. This will be only the second such program in the state, Rogers said. He knows of at least one student now studying out of state who plans to transfer to BGSU. David Levey, chair of the trustees, asked how faculty would be hired for the new program. Rogers said that the department has a strength in software and has hired one professor in each of the last four years. The specialization now enrolls 17 students, according to the proposal. The university expects to enroll 50 students in the new major in the first year and have 200 within the first five years. “It’s a very rigorous program,” Rogers said. The major must now be approved at the state level. The possibility of another new major related to engineering was mentioned when the trustees approved the naming of the Stephen and Deborah Harris RIXAN Robotics Laboratory. The lab, which now under construction, will allow the College of Technology, Architecture and Applied Engineering to go ahead with the creation of a degree in mechatronics, an interdisciplinary field that combines electronics with a number of other engineering disciplines. Also, the trustees approved changing the name of the aviation program from Bachelor of Science in Technology to a Bachelor of Science in Aviation. This will be consistent with industry practices, Rogers said. When the matter was approved by faculty senate, Carl Braun, the liaison for the aviation program, said that often graduates have to explain their degrees to prospective employers.  Students and graduates have been requesting the change. Rogers also reported to that applications and students who have been accepted to the university for the fall, 2017 class, are both up by 2 percent from the same time last year. More students have also made housing deposits. Applications for transfer students are running a little behind. Rogers also expressed confidence that the university will meet its goal of retaining 80 percent of the…


Honoring donors name of the game for BGSU trustees

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University has momentum in its quest to have facilities, whether a building or a room, named for donors. On Friday, the university’s Board of Trustees approved the naming of five facilities, small and large. President Mary Ellen Mazey credited Michael Kuhlin’s donations that resulted in the Michael and Sara Kuhlin Center with getting the ball rolling. Mazey said that will continue into next year. Shea McGrew, vice president for University Advancement, said after the meeting that he expects to have some of the million dollar donors behind the planned renovation of Hanna Hall into a new home for the College of Business present when the trustees convene in February. McGrew said that the naming of facilities approved Friday represented a total about $3.4 million in gifts. Mazey said it is important to have the trustees not only approve the naming of facilities, but to also recognize the donors at their meetings. All but one of the donors were present for the trustees meeting. Stephen Harris, who with his wife, Deborah, provided the funds for a new robotics lab, died very recently. McGrew said he hoped Deborah Harris will be able to attend the February trustees meeting. The Stephen and Deborah Harris RIXAN Robotics Laboratory will allow the university to go ahead with a degree in mechatronics, McGrew said. The lab is now under construction. The patriarch of a family of “rink rats,” Scott Slater will have his contributions to the university recognized in the Slater Family Ice Arena. Slater has long been a supporter of hockey at the university, providing crucial support when the program was threatened with discontinuation. In addressing the board, he said education was valuable as are athletics “which build character.” “When you have both of them you have a great chance to successful in work,” he said. Slater said he hoped that the work funded by his donation will “give the old lady a new heart” and insure the arena will be viable for another 50 years. Steve Krakoff, vice president for Capital Planning and Design, said the university is working with a design firm that specializes in ice arenas to determine what renovations the facility needs. The university library’s Sound Recording Archives will be named for Bill Schurk, the librarian and archivist responsible for building up the internationally recognized collection. Schurk said he knew as an undergraduate he wanted to return as a librarian. He said he was told about the new audio library in planned for Jerome Library, which was then under construction. As he was walking to class he looked up at the library on progress and decided this is where he wanted to be. “I’ve become engulfed in this university. This university has become part of my life.” Schurk is retiring this month…


BGSU trustees to vote on naming ice arena for Slater family

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COOMMUNICATIONS The Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees will be asked to approve the naming of the “Slater Family Ice Arena” at its Dec. 9 board meeting. The naming is in recognition of a gift from the Scott Slater family. Slater ’73 enrolled at BGSU in the fall of 1969 and first attended Falcon hockey games with his future in-laws, who had season tickets. Nearly 50 years later, Slater still has those same seats in the upper level of the Ice Arena, and in the decades since, he has done much more than just cheer for the Falcons. Slater and his family were major contributors to the “Bring Back the Glory” campaign that secured the BGSU hockey program. Now, the family is making a $2 million transformational gift to advance the future of the facility that means so much to them. “The Slaters are a true Falcon Family,” said Mary Ellen Mazey, Ph.D., president of Bowling Green State University. “Through the years, they have made the University central to their lives with support of BGSU Hockey and many community programs such as high school hockey and figure skating. It is fitting, and inspirational, that their dedication become a permanent part of the University with the naming of the Slater Family Ice Arena.” Over many years, Scott Slater’s six children were involved in youth and high school hockey and figure skating programs at the Ice Arena. His four sons have each been part of the highly successful Bowling Green High School hockey program and been on teams that won state championships or finished as state runners-up, while his two daughters participated in figure skating. Now his grandchildren are “rink rats” on the ice at BGSU, and Slater and his family have made another generous gift to secure the future of the facility that is so close to their hearts, and will now carry their name. “It is a BGSU-owned asset, but my family has always viewed it as more a community asset,” he said. “The thing I like is that, more than anything else in town, the Ice Arena is a place where the University and the community really merge together. That’s been a wonderful thing for a lot of people, for a very long time.” Mike Natyshak, a member of the 1984 BGSU national championship team, was a freshman hockey player from Belle River, Ontario, when he met the Slaters. They were part of the first group of host families that opened their homes to student-athletes from outside the country and helped them transition to life in an unfamiliar place. “Scott had a very important job to worry about, and he and his wife already had a house full of kids, but he knew the University needed assistance so he took in this hockey…


English Department & General Studies Writing to merge at BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Faculty Senate at Bowling Green State University moved to join together units that no one quite remembered the reason for splitting in the first place. The senate Tuesday voted to merge the General Studies Writing program, which teaches the basic writing courses mostly to first-year students, with the English Department. After a presentation by Lawrence Coates, who chairs the English Department, and Lee Nickoson, director of General Studies Writing, Rebecca Mancuso, of history, noted she was always “mystified” why the two were separated. The split occurred on 2003. “Are there any drawbacks?” she asked of the merger. Only a need for a larger meeting room, said Nickoson. Offices for both units are on the second floor of East Hall. Each unit has about 30 faculty members, Coates said. Faculty members in both units approved the merger. Coates said that the merger will allow those now teaching in the General Studies Writing to teach courses other than writing. Now even though they may have background in other disciplines within English, they can only teach those courses in special circumstances. “We look forward to having that expertise freed up,” Coates said. Conversely, it will allow some English Department faculty to teach first year writing, Nickoson said. As envisioned, the merger will mean that writing courses will be extended throughout the curriculum, and into courses for upperclassmen. Some administrative changes will be required. These will result in cost savings of a few thousand dollars. The Board of Trustees will have final approval on the change.


Faculty will write next chapter in plan to reduce textbook costs

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University Faculty Senate opted not to take action on a resolution calling for a goal of cutting student textbook costs by 50 percent. Instead the senate at the urging of Jim Evans will leave it up to an ad hoc committee to come up with a proposal, and then will act on that proposal. That’s the way the senate procedure should work, Evans said. He argued that the resolution before the senate, which had been tabled in November, would be an “insult” to the members of the ad hoc committee because it spells out what they should decide. That resolution called for the committee to report to the full senate by next May, and there was no indication that the timeline would change. Everyone in the senate, everyone at the university, Evans said, wants lower textbook costs. The senate should allow the committee to study the issue and deliver a resolution based on what they find. The decision should be based on “facts and data” not “hearsay,” which is how he characterized what was in the resolution. Anne Gordon asked why the resolution insisted that BGSU lead the state in reducing textbook cost. “That seems to me to be part of the agenda of moving so quickly,” she said. “Why is taking lead in this issue so important?” Allen Rogel said it was important for the senate and the university to present options before “we get something rammed down our throats by the legislature.” Provost Rodney Rogers noted in his remarks that the BGSU Board of Trustees will be discussing textbook costs. At November’s meeting when the resolution was first presented, the initiatives BGSU is already taking were spelled out. Those included the bookstore’s BGSU Choose program through which students can comparison shop for books. Also, the library buys copies of some of the most in demand textbooks and makes them available at the reserve desk. David Jackson said “faculty have little control over what private corporations charge for textbooks.” Michelle Heckman, said the Math Emporium was able to negotiate getting materials for 60 percent less when it bypassed the bookstore. The motion to delay consideration of the resolution until the ad hoc committee delivers its report passed 45-21.


BG unanimously rejects easement for pipeline

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   As protesters packed the city building and chanted outside, Bowling Green City Council voted unanimously Monday evening to deny an easement for a pipeline across city property. The decision was full of drama – with one man being escorted from the meeting by police, and the city building packed to capacity, so about 40 people had to listen to speakers relaying the meeting outside. Council President Mike Aspacher started the meeting by asking to depart from the regular agenda. “The building is overflowing,” causing concerns to the fire chief, he said. So, Aspacher suggested that council go straight to the pipeline ordinance and vote prior to hearing any testimony. That caused a brief uproar in council chambers, with people demanding to be heard. Aspacher said council had listened to many comments at the last two meetings, and wished to act on the ordinance. But Joe DeMare, who recently ran for U.S. Senate with the Green Party, continued his objection. “I’m respectfully requesting that you listen to the people,” DeMare said. “Please take your seat,” Aspacher again asked. When DeMare refused, Aspacher asked police to escort him out of council chambers. Then council member Sandy Rowland told the packed room that they would not be displeased with council’s action. And one by one, the council members stated why they planned to vote down the easement. The delay in the speaker system outside the city building meant the cheers from the parking lot rose up to council chambers about 20 seconds later than the action was taken. After three council members explained their “no” votes, the chants of “one more vote” started outside.  Council member John Zanfardino went over to the window and opened it wider to hear the chants and announce that he would be the fourth vote to reject the pipeline easement. “I just don’t want to be complicit voting for pipelines,” Zanfardino said. Then a new chant rose up from outside. “This is what democracy looks like.” Council’s vote at least temporarily denies Nexus natural gas pipeline the right to cross 29 acres of city land located in Middleton Township, about 2.5 miles east of the city’s water treatment plant. The Bowling Green vote came one day after federal officials announced the much protested Dakota Access Pipeline would be rerouted. That fact was not lost on Anita Britt, who thanked council for looking at the bigger issue. “Thank you for listening to the voices of your community,” she said. She praised council for “doing your part to change history.” Another pipeline protester, Andrew Smith from Elyria, thanked council for showing courage that some communities have lacked. But he added, “You are not the only people fighting this.” Smith also warned that council’s action may lead to lawsuits. “This battle does not…


BG a bubble of more liberal voters in last election

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   It’s not unusual for Bowling Green to be a bubble of liberal thought in Wood County. So when the General Election vote tallies last month in Bowling Green didn’t jive with the Wood County totals that went purely Republican, it was not a surprise. But when a meeting was held last week on BGSU’s campus, one person in the audience brought up concerns about living in a community where the majority of the voters supported Donald Trump. That new realization gave him a bad feeling about Bowling Green that he hadn’t felt before. So while it’s not a surprise, maybe it is worthy of a story that the majority of Bowling Green voters did not cast their ballots for Trump. In Wood County, Hillary Clinton got just 42 percent of the vote. But in Bowling Green, she secured nearly 61 percent of the vote, with 7,161 votes for Clinton compared to 4,621 for Trump. Clinton won in all four wards of the city – ranging from getting a high of 70 percent in the Second Ward to a low of 54 percent in the Fourth Ward. Derrick Jones, assistant director of BGSU Academics and Assessment, said at last week’s meeting on campus that Wood County’s support of Trump as president called into question the inclusive and diverse philosophy of the university and surrounding community. He mentioned the Not In Our Town organization which works to stop hateful speech and discriminatory actions on campus and in the community. “While we’re saying ‘Not In Our Town,’ we may be thinking, ‘definitely in our town,’” Jones said questioning how much that organization stands for the true feelings of the community. Bowling Green also voted differently than the rest of the county in other races. This election year was decidedly one-sided, with only Republicans winning contested races in Wood County. There were no tight races. Theresa Gavarone solidly beat Kelly Wicks for the state representative seat. Dr. Ted Bowlus unseated Wood County Commissioner Joel Kuhlman – meaning for the first time in several decades the three commissioners will all be Republicans. Matt Reger won the judge seat, Mark Wasylyshyn was re-elected as sheriff, Craig LaHote was returned as county commissioner, and Jane Spoerl won handily as county treasurer. Wood County voters also re-elected Republicans Bob Latta to the House of Representatives, Randy Gardner to the Ohio Senate, and swung their weight for Rob Portman in the U.S. Senate. But Bowling Green voters did not consistently follow suit with the rest of the county. A majority of BG voters threw their support toward Democrats Strickland (51 percent), Wicks (57 percent), Kolanko (54 percent), Kuhlman (60 percent), and Ruth Babel Smith for sheriff (51 percent). In BG, Democrat Jason Hartigan earned 50 percent of the vote for county…


Everyone gets into the act at Arts X

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News At Arts X a surprise awaits the visitor around every corner. An actress in a shimmering gown and dramatic blond wig, steps forward to sing “Let It Go.” One of the Living Statues in the lobby of the Wolfe Center, she’s been waiting her turn as other characters have stepped forward to offer a song or monologue. Look up and there’s a pair of eyes projected overhead. Big Sister is watching. As the audience settles for a performance in the Donnell Theatre, someone says she has just posed for a Vogue cover. Two comedians come careening down the hall on the second floor of the Wolfe Center, making a harried entrance into the Heskett dance studio. Do you know there’s an art exhibit, they exclaim. It’s part of the act; we’re all part of the act. There’s always something to see and hear and do at Arts X, and that means there’s always something to miss. There’s always someone new to meet, or an old friend to greet. With the end of the semester looming, and finals and holiday festivities just ahead, artists, performers, writers and their fans took time out to celebrate. Arts X drew hundreds to the Bowling Green State University School of Art and the Wolfe Center Saturday night. The annual event is part art fair, part music and theater festival, part holiday party. Arts X organizers have been tweaking its presentation since the start. This year the Bowling Green Philharmonia offered a prelude of holiday music in the Donnell before the hubbub officially ensued. The theme “Volanti: Seeking Unknown Heights” tied in with the featured guest artists Violet and Fortuna, storytelling acrobats. They performed two shows in the Donnell, sections from their work-in-progress, “Laces.” The piece combined a disembodied voice emerging from the dark to set the scene, a house in Toledo’s Old West End. The scenes introduced the audience to the home’s inhabitants. There was a very tall man, the original owner. There were stuffed toys left behind in a trunk. There was a lesbian couple who made the property bloom with plants and company. These stories were played out with circus arts – aerial work, acrobatics, clowning, tightrope walking. In the most dramatic instances the duo of Erin Garber-Pearson and Kathleen Livingston hung high above the Donnell stage, muscles taut, twisting in light and shadow. Auxwerks, a dance company from Ann Arbor, swept through – literally in one scene – offering impressionistic transitions between the scenes. Pop Culture Professor Montana Miller added a few high flying stories of her own about her girlhood when she felt miscast as a human. She wanted to fly, and she pursued that, always falling just shy of realizing her dream. She took to the air in the Donnell using aerial acrobatics to…


Former BGSU chief talks about OSU attack response

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Monica Moll, formerly the police chief at BGSU, was on the job about a month at Ohio State University when her new campus came under attack. On Monday, a man plowed his car into a group of people and then pulled out a knife and charged at victims. Eleven people were hospitalized after the attack. Within a couple minutes, the attacker, student Abdul Razak Ali Artan, had been shot and killed by OSU Police Officer Alan Horujko. The incident was resolved in about the best possible manner, said Moll, now the director of public safety at OSU. “We had an officer in the right place at the right time,” she said on Thursday. Horujko had been responding to a report of a possible gas leak in the area of the attack. The officer credited his training for his quick response. “It all went according to planning,” Moll said. The university’s active shooter training and campus alert system are being credited for helping the community maintain order while the scene was secured. The campus is one of the largest in the U.S., with nearly 60,000 registered students. Law enforcement from the region responded, with officers arriving from Columbus police and fire departments, Ohio State Patrol, ATF, FBI, Homeland Security, Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, and other nearby campuses. OSU Police Chief Craig Stone said his officers train annually to handle active shooters, on defensive tactics and firearms. “The good news is, they have a well-oiled machine down here,” Moll said. The dispatch center was bombarded with reports and questions as the incident unfolded. “They were flooded with calls,” she said. “The dispatchers did an excellent job.” Stone said students and staff have been urged to report problems. “We encouraged people to call us,” he said. That vigilance is even more heightened on campus now. “If you see something, say something.” It wasn’t just the emergency responders whose training kicked in, but also students and faculty who had been trained for a violent incident. The campus offers a training video called “Surviving an Active Shooter.” The training is not mandated for students, faculty or staff, but the video has logged more than 350,000 views. “It really applies to any emergency,” Moll said. A campus alert sent out moments after the attack warned those on campus to “Run, Hide, Fight.” The training had prepared students to flee from the danger if they could, hide in place if they could not run, and fight if necessary. Cell phone photos sent out from campus showed students who had stacked up chairs and desks in front of classroom doors to barricade themselves in and keep out an attacker. Moll said BGSU uses the ALICE training program, which stands for Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter and Evacuate. “They are all similar…


Student charged for filing false assault report with campus police

By BG INDEPENDENT NEWS Bowling Green State University police have charged a second student with falsely claiming he was assaulted on campus several weeks ago. Nicholas Davis, 22, had told police on Nov. 15  that he had been assaulted behind the Student Recreation Center, called anti-gay slurs, and had his cell phone stolen. After the initial report, he said his phone had not been stolen and that he found it on the scene. Further investigation by police determined the assault had not occurred. Acting Police Chief Mike Campbell said Davis has been charged and released. He will have a hearing at Bowling Green Municipal Court. Campbell said that his officers spend many times and hours investigating reports and if those reports are false that takes time away from other police operations. Still, he said, a distinction needs to be made between a report that is legitimately a mistake and one that is deliberately false. Campbell said he would never discourage anyone from reporting an incident. “We want them to report those things.” Campbell said that there has been a heightened sense of apprehension on campus since the election, though there has not been an increase in incidents. “It’s just a matter of providing needed support” and helping people in the community and campus understand that BGSU “is a safe and inclusive environment.” Campbell said that Davis had told others that he wanted to bring attention to the problems faced by members of the LBGT community. Bowling Green city police filed charges two weeks ago, against another student who claimed she had been assaulted on Crim Street on Election Night. They determined the report was false. Eleesha Long was charged with falsification and obstructing official business.      


BGSU Lively Arts Calendar through Dec. 9

Dec. 1—The International Film Series concludes with the 1977 film “Neokanchennaia P’esa Dlia Mekhanicheskogo Pianino (An Unfinished Piece for Mechanical Piano),” directed by Nikita Mikhalkov. From Russia’s most well-known contemporary filmmaker, an intriguing story of former lovers who meet at a pre-revolutionary country estate. Casual conversations on social issues and the music of Liszt, Rachmaninoff and Donizetti supply background to a Chekhovian treatment of returning past love. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Dec. 1—Creative writing students in the bachelor of fine arts program will present their work. The reading begins at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Dec. 1—World Percussion Night features multiple styles including performances by the Taiko, Afro-Caribbean and Gamelan ensembles. The concert begins at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171. Advance tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for students and children. All tickets the day of the concert are $10. Dec. 3— BG Philharmonia will perform a Holiday Concert to kick off the 12th annual ArtsX events. The performance will begin at 4 p.m. in the Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Dec. 3—The 12th annual ArtsX will take place from 5-9 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center and the Wolfe Center for the Arts, including the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries, where student and faculty artists and performers show off their talents to the community. The evening includes works from the College of Musical Arts, the School of Art, the Department of Theatre and Film, the Creative Writing Program, the Dance Program, and numerous other organizations, along with holiday shopping. Free Dec. 3—The Annual Faculty and Staff Exhibition opening reception will be held from 5-9 p.m. in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries located in the Fine Arts Center as part of ArtsX events. Free Dec. 4-14—The Annual Faculty and Staff Exhibition will be on display in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Dec. 4— The University Choral Society performs Handel’s “Messiah” with the Toledo Symphony Orchestra in the Peristyle at the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St. in Toledo. The performance begins at 2 p.m. Call the Toledo Symphony Orchestra box office at 419-246-8000  for ticket information. Dec. 5—BGSU’s Wind Symphony will give a chamber concert at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Dec. 4-14—The Annual Faculty and Staff Exhibition will be on display in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries in the Fine Arts Center….