Campus

Scholar puts feminist spin on issues of sports & fitness

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Scholar Pirkko Markula’s talk Monday at Bowling Green State University on “Women’s Empowerment Through Sport and Exercise: Rhetoric or Reality?” revolved around pole dancing, or pole fitness, as it has come to be called. The exercise, popularized in strip clubs, has become a popular form of fitness training for women. Markula opened her talk with positive comments about the activity by one of her students and testimonials from those who participate in pole workouts. The student reported that it helped build her self-confidence as someone who had “overwhelming dissatisfaction with my own body.” This led Markula, who is a professor at the University of Alberta, to wonder: “Pole fitness may be an avenue by which women can develop and maintain positive body image as a result of an environment that emphasizes body acceptance and the body’s abilities.” Still the exercise, with its emphasis on shaping the woman’s body in a stereotypical form that appeals to men, is problematic. At the conclusion of the lecture, Leda Hayes, a graduate student in American Culture Studies, asked the speaker if the popularity of pole fitness could lessen the stigma on those working in the sex industry. Markula said she, contrary to what some believe, considers the sex industry harmful to women, and she wondered why women would choose the particular form of exercise to do. There are other forms of pole exercise, including one practiced in China, that are not sexualized and provide the same benefits. Pole fitness, like female sports and fitness in general, is fraught with issues about social expectations and norms, about empowerment and…


Students to clean up reputations and neighborhoods at same time

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   BGSU students often get trashed for not being good neighbors to full-time city residents. In an effort to clean up their reputations and their neighborhoods at the same time, an Adopt a Block program is being started with the help of the City-University Relations Commission. Danielle Parker, vice president of the Undergraduate Student Government at Bowling Green State University, said the program will help students connect with the community. “This is a new and exciting way for students to give back, besides dropping off some canned goods and walking away,” Parker said. The program will work somewhat like the larger scale “Adopt a Highway” effort. Ten “blocks” have been established by the City-University Relations Commission. Student groups will be asked to adopt an area then head out once a month and pick up trash in the medians. The trash will then be disposed of in the dumpsters behind the city fire station and electric division on Thurstin and Court streets. The 10 “blocks” up for adoption are: North Enterprise from East Wooster to Frazee Avenue. North Summit from East Wooster to Frazee Avenue. North Prospect from East Wooster to Frazee Avenue. East Court Street from North Prospect to Thurstin Avenue. Pike Street from North Prospect to Thurstin Avenue. Ridge Street from North Prospect to Thurstin Avenue. Merry Street from North Prospect to Thurstin Avenue. Reed Street from North Prospect to Thurstin Avenue. Area bordered by Wooster, Biddle, Clough and South College. Area bordered by Wooster, South Enterprise, Clough and South Prospect. “Students will go out and take care of that block,” Parker…


BGSU plans to get down with Earth Month activities

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS BGSU is mobilizing the community to get involved with sustainability efforts and issues during April. A full slate of Earth Month events and activities has been planned to raise awareness about and combat the effects of global climate change. Organized by the Office of Campus Sustainability, all the events are free and open to the public. Visit the website for full details. http://www.bgsu.edu/campus-sustainability/earth-month.html In 2015, the University adopted its Climate Action Plan to help meet its goal of being a carbon-neutral institution by 2040 as part of the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment. Students have been active participants in BGSU’s environmental efforts. Among them, the student-led Green Initiatives Fund  provides a pool of money for projects that enhance sustainability at BGSU. In honor of Earth Month, the Environmental Service Club invites others to join its “Adopt-a-Highway Earth Month Edition” on April 16. To learn more about the issues surrounding climate change, the community is invited to attend a guest lecture by Dr. Henry Pollack, a professor emeritus of geophysics at the University of Michigan. He will be presenting a blend of climate science and policy in a talk entitled “Good COP, Bad COP: The Paris Climate Accord,” at 7 p.m. April 18 in the Bowen-Thompson Student Union Theater. Pollack will share his research on how to move forward with public policy even though there is scientific uncertainty. A highlight of the month is always the annual Eco-Fair, on Earth Day, April 20. The fair runs from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Union Oval and features environmental organizations, groups and initiatives from…


Gloria Gajewicz honored for home grown science teaching skills

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green teacher Gloria Gajewicz was inspired through her career by her own teachers, and further by her mother’s pursuit of education. So it is fitting that she should receive an award named for the late Neil Pohlmann, an educator and BGSU professor who left his mark on science education. Earlier this month Gajewicz won the first Neil Pohlman Award given by Bowling Green State University at the spring conference of the Northwest Ohio School Boards Association meeting. Patrick Pauken, director of the School of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Policy, said the award “is given in recognition of valuable contribution to Educational Administration and Leadership Studies at BGSU.” Gajewicz is working on her doctorate in the program. The award carries a scholarship. Pauken wrote: “The faculty selected Gloria for the award because of her endless dedication to teaching, learning, and leading in our schools. She is an excellent graduate student, as well, inspiring her classmates with her professional stories of student success. Our classrooms and schools are special places, indeed, with teachers and leaders like Gloria Gajewicz.” Gajewicz has taught science for 20 years, the last 16 at her alma mater, Bowling Green High School where she teaches biology and honors physical science. Finishing her second semester of what she expects will be a four-year process, Gajewicz’s goal is to become a curriculum specialist with her particular interest in science. She said she was inspired to pursue science by the many great science teachers she had in the Bowling Green system. That included Roger Mazzarella, “the wizard of Mazz,” in seventh grade and Bob Rex in…


BGSU administration, union announce contract agreement

The administration and faculty union have just issued this joint statement: March 30, 2016 Dear Colleagues, We are pleased to share that the University and the BGSU Faculty Association- AAUP have completed negotiations on our second collective bargaining agreement which, when ratified by both BGSU-FA members and the BGSU Board of Trustees, will cover July 1, 2016, through June 30, 2019. As shared in previous joint communications on the bargaining process, both the University and BGSU-FA are committed to producing a fair contract that supports the broader mission of excellence in teaching, research, and service at BGSU. Both teams worked collaboratively and in good faith over the past year to achieve this goal. We elected to use the Interest-Based Bargaining (IBB) approach, which allowed us to reach joint solutions on recommended changes to this proposed successor collective bargaining agreement that met the interests of both parties. The IBB approach allowed us to work collegially to find creative consensus solutions that addressed the issues each party hoped to address. The proposed 2016-2019 Collective Bargaining Agreement between Bowling Green State University and the BGSU-FA will be distributed shortly. The timeline for both parties is to conduct the ratification vote by BGSU-FA members the week of April 18-22; assuming ratification, the Collective Bargaining Agreement would be submitted to the BGSU Board of Trustees for their review and approval at the May 6, 2016, meeting. We extend our thanks to members of both bargaining teams for their hard work over the past year to bring us this proposed contract that we both believe will help us to continue building stronger relations between the University…


BGSU Lively Arts calendar through April 13

Through April 3—The BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries at BGSU’s Fine Arts Center, and will run through April 3. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free March 30—The Guest Artists series continues with pianists Gulimina Mahamuti and Frank Chiou. The performance begins at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 31—The College of Musical Arts presents a Student Composers Forum, beginning at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 31—The International Film Series continues with the 2014 Russian film ”Leviafan (Leviathan).” Director Andrei Zviagintsev has defended his film as an eternal story against those who saw in it pointed criticism of Russian society. The film follows a family living in a small coastal town in the Murmansk region who confront the mayor, who is trying to take their land and small business. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 2—Bravo! BGSU, a black-tie optional gala, showcases the best of BGSU arts students and faculty. Performances, exhibits, readings and other activities take place throughout the Wolfe Center for the Arts from 7- 10 p.m. Sponsored by PNC, the even raises funds for arts student scholarships. Tickets are $100 per person and are available by contacting the Office of the President at 419-372-6780 or by emailing lmattia@bgsu.edu. For more information, visit bgsu.edu/bravo. April 3—The Sunday Matinee Series continues with “Soundies, Snaders, and Scopitones…


BGSU Lively Arts Calendar, through April 6

Through April 3—The BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries at BGSU’s Fine Arts Center, and will run through April 3. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free March 29—Viola students of Matthew Daline will perform at the Manor House located at Wildwood Metropark, 5100 W. Central Ave., Toledo. The performance begins at 7:30 p.m. Free March 29 —Tuesdays at the Gish series ends this semester with “Girl, Interrupted” (1999). Director James Mangold’s film follows young Susanna, who gets checked into a psychiatric hospital, where she begins to find herself among new friends and enemies. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free March 29—College of Musical Arts students of tuba and euphonium will perform under the direction of David Saltzmann. The recital begins at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 30—The Guest Artists series continues with pianists Gulimina Mahamuti and Frank Chiou. The performance begins at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 31—The College of Musical Arts presents a Student Composers Forum, beginning at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 31—The International Film Series continues with the 2014 Russian film ”Leviafan (Leviathan).” Director Andrei Zviagintsev has defended his film as an eternal story against those who saw in it pointed criticism of Russian society. The film follows a family living in a small coastal…


Common Good benefit celebrates diversity within community

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Common Good of the UCF is what those it serves make of it. The house at 113 Crim St. is the vortex of activities aimed at bettering the lives of people, and the community they live in. That can involve picking up the exterior spaces with neighborhood cleanups, or it can mean the clearing of interior spaces through meditation. That can mean growing sustenance for the body at two community gardens and a food pantry, or providing sustenance for the mind through discussions about spirituality and current event. And at dinner dialogues those two missions meet. The Common Good of the UCF embraces this broad mission because that’s what people have told them their needs are. The organization’s own needs are simple, but real. On Thursday, April 7, at 6:30 p.m. the Common Good will present “Expressions of Arthenticity,” at the Clazel, 127 N. Main St., Bowling Green. Tickets are $25 and $15 with a student identification. One beverage and a dessert bar come with admission. The show includes a fashion show, live jazz and an auction. Tickets are available at Common Good and Grounds for Thought, 174 S. Main St., or by calling 513-314-4489. Caroline Dawson, the financial developer for Common Good, said that the fashion show, which will start at 7:30p.m., will feature clothing from local boutiques and hair and makeup by local salons. The models will be of all ages, body types and ethnicities. That reflects the philosophy of the Common Good, she said. “We offer diversity here and embrace diversity.” Those who participate range in age from kids in…


BGSU putting on the glitz to raise money for arts scholarships

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In its inaugural year in 2015, Bravo! BGSU got it share of bravos. Lisa Mattiace, chief of staff for President Mary Ellen Mazey, said “thrilling” and “spectacular” were among the words attendees used for the black tie optional event. Mariah Burks, then a senior in theater and the recent winner of the Kennedy Center’s Irene Ryan Acting Scholarship, performed and remembers the event as having plenty of “glitz and glam.” Take away the champagne glasses, she said, and those attended got a good sense of what goes on every day in the university’s studios. As for her BGSU experience, she said: “It was an amusement park. I’m not even going to try to sugarcoat it. As an undergraduate there are moments, trying different stuff, where you’re absolutely terrified and you say ‘I’m not going to do it, I’m not going to go on that ride.’” But other times, she just embraced the challenge. And like that trip to the amusement park, “you have all your friends with you,” Burks said. These friends form a support system, “a family really.” The most notable ovation at the 2015 Bravo! BGSU came in the dollars raised for arts scholarships, $65,000. The president’s office isn’t resting on those laurels, though. This year’s event on April 2 from 7 to 10 p.m. in the Wolfe Center, will add more luster, in the hopes of adding more lucre, to the arts scholarship coffers. Tickets are $100 and are available by calling 419-372-6780 or by emailing lmattia@bgsu.edu. Some attendees at last year’s Bravo! Expressed the view that the arts at Bowling…


BGSU orchestra takes students on tour of ‘The Planets’

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Students from local schools filled Kobacker Hall on the Bowling Green State University campus Thursday morning. They’d been invited by conductor Emily Freeman Brown to go on a journey through Gustav Holst’s “The Planets.” Given the number of people, a few coughs were inevitable as Brown and the orchestra took them on a musical tour of the solar system and along the way introduced them to the ancient deities who lent their names to the planets. Then came the last movement of the piece, Neptune, the god of mystery. “We’ll have some secret visitors,” Brown told the audience before the movement began. “Listen carefully.” And as the piece neared its conclusion, high, soft voices were softly heard offstage, ghostly, wafting over the orchestra. By the end, only the voices were heard. No violins. No harps. No brass, percussion nor woodwinds. No coughs. Hundreds of children silent as the music faded away. “That response is proof that we’re doing something good,” the conductor said after the performance. Sharing music “is fundamental to human nature.” This was not the first time Brown has led the orchestra in a performance of “The Planets” for a young audience. She did it back in 1992. Those kids would be old enough to have children of their own. How the university has presented young people’s shows has changed over the years. Brown’s first endeavor in 1991 was a trimmed down version of Mozart’s opera “The Magic Flute.” For a number of years, the College of Music presented Saturday morning programs modeled after Leonard Bernstein’s Young People’s Concerts. But attendance at…


BGSU hears about taking the initiative to keep students engaged

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Vincent Tinto left the best news for the end of his keynote address Monday at Bowling Green State University’s Teaching and Learning Fair. “You don’t need new initiatives,” he told the luncheon crowd in the student union ballroom. “You have enough of them.” And they seem to be working. “I’m very impressed with the directions you’re taking.” Tinto, a professor emeritus from Syracuse University who is considered a leading scholar in how to keep students in college, prefaced this good news with a review of approaches to help students succeed. To anyone paying attention to curriculum developments on campus, much did seem familiar. Supporting students means engaging them in the classroom, giving them a sense of belonging, setting high expectations and then assessing what’s working, Tinto said. He reviewed strategies to do all this. For example, he said, “we hear again and again and again, that students do better in groups than they do on their own.” Tinto continued: “The thing that drives learning in the classroom is active engagement with others in the classroom…. That drives a sense of belonging in the classroom.” That learning can come in many flavors – collaborative, cooperative, problem-based or project-based. All, he said, use the student’s interest in making social connections in order to get them more involved in their learning. Those groups, though, must be structured by the teachers. Letting students select who they work with often leads to one person doing most of the work. The more students work together, the more they will study. “Active engagement with others predicts time on task,” he says. And…


Once & future Falcons: BGSU presidents discuss achievements & challenges facing higher ed

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The recent history of Bowling Green State University was gathered on stage of the Bowen Thompson Student Union Monday afternoon. Two past presidents, Sidney Ribeau, 1995-2008, and Carol Cartwright, 2008-2011, and Mary Ellen Mazey, who has been president since 2011, discussed past achievements and the challenges facing the university. Ribeau said that educators, whether those on the stage with him or the faculty and administrators in the audience, need to advocate for the value of higher education. “The criticism higher education is taking, that we need to change this way and that way and be more like Fortune 500 companies, is not well founded,” he said. “Higher education in America is still the envy of all the world. … When you travel to other countries, they are modeling their universities after our universities.” He noted that during the economic downtown when so many sectors of the economy were suffering a meltdown, higher education continued to do well. He dismissed those who say colleges need to graduate students faster and need to make radical changes. “We need to graduate students who want jobs. They need to be able to think, to be able to analyze. They need to have character. They need to stand for something. They need to be leaders so we don’t have the fiasco like we’re seeing in our current presidential campaign. “Higher education has real role to play in our society,” Ribeau continued. “We need to speak to the value of higher education as a difference maker in our society. We’re not going to have a better world unless we really…


Small ensembles compete for cash & bragging rights at BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News With the list of winners in hand Connor Nelson didn’t waste any time making the announcement everyone was waiting for. He’d been in this situation many times before, the flutist said. So he announced the 10th class of winners in The Bowling Green State University College of Musical Arts Chamber Music Competition. Nelson with fellow faculty member Susan Nelson coordinated this year’s event. The event was founded by Douglas Wayland in 2007 to give instrumentalists a chance to hone their skills in a way only having to perform before a panel of judges and having their performances ranked among their peers will do. The event now bears the name of the founder, who died in November, 2013. The Wayland competition is sponsored in his honor by Pro Musica. The competition took its place with the Competitions in Music for concerto soloists and the Conrad Art Song Competition for vocalists and pianists. So this weekend, musicians in ensembles of three to six members competed. Each is coached by a faculty member or graduate student. This year eight undergraduate ensembles with 26 musicians and seven graduate ensembles with 28 musicians competed. The semifinals were held Saturday. For both rounds panels of outside musicians were brought in to judge. Four undergraduates and three graduate finalists were selected to move on to Sunday’s final round where they performed up to 18 minutes of music. The finals got underway with a torrent of saxophone sound from Enohpoxas, that is “saxophone” spelled backwards – the names of the ensembles are often as fanciful as the music played. As in the…


The Hart of the matter: Jazz saxophonist shares passion for music at BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Antonio Hart first took the stage at Bowling Green State University, he had some stern advice for the music students in the audience. Ask me questions. Citing his experience playing with some of the greats in jazz, he said students needed to take advantage of having him among them for a while. Then he played demonstrating the mastery students could aspire to. That was Wednesday night when Hart performed with the jazz faculty, arriving shortly before from Thailand. He was in town through Thursday before leaving on an early morning flight back to New York before heading back east to China. Hart is a man on the move, squeezing as much as he can during his sabbatical from Queens College in New York City where he teaches. Still when Adonai Henderson took him up on his offer to ask a question Thursday after a coaching session with small bands, it was as if time stopped. As the crew reset the Kobacker stage for the Lab I rehearsal and concert, Hart sat at the piano and gave Henderson a lesson. During the session before, Hart had drilled the quintet Henderson was a part of on the proper execution of the melody to Charlie Parker’s “Scrapple from the Apple.” It’s a bebop standard many fans and even players may take for granted. Something to set the stage before the improvisation. But Hart brought such notions up short. It’s the beginning and end of a tune that stays with the listener. He spent a good half hour with group, on how to articulate each phrase of…


BGSU students respond to university’s stance on city solar project

Lily Murnen, Environmental Service Club president, and Matthew Cunningham, Environmental Action Group president, have responded to the university administration’s explanation of why Bowling Green Sate University will not participate in a city solar project by allowing the construction of a solar array on campus. See related story: http://bgindependentmedia.org/2016/03/08/bgsu-sheds-light-on-why-its-taking-a-pass-on-city-solar-project/ Dear President Mazey, Dr. Hennessy, and Dr. Meyer, Thank you for explaining the University’s position concerning the city solar project. We understand the concerns that BGSU has regarding the leasing of campus property, and we agree that there is great potential for university­owned renewable projects on campus. We are excited to see that within the past month there has been a convergence of many different groups all advocating for the development of renewable energy on campus. 1. The Student Green Initiatives Committee has made clear that putting solar panels on campus is one of their top priorities, and funding will be allocated for these kinds of projects. 2. With the proper publicity through the University, the existence of the Clean Energy Fund could provide additional funding for solar, wind, geothermal, and other campus energy projects. 3. The Environmental Impact Assessment course (ENVS 4020) is undertaking an environmental impact assessment of the potential for small­scale solar arrays around campus. This assessment will include feasible locations for solar panels using cost­benefit analyses and accounting for many variables. 4. The many student organizations that signed on to our first and second letters to President Mazey further support the development of solar and other clean energy initiatives as a top priority. 5. The Renewable Energy Feasibility Study was a positive first step on the part of the…