Campus

Dance Marathon benefit dinner raises money For Mercy Children’s Hospital

By ALYSSA ANN ALFANO Student Contributor Twenty-four hours of dancing, 120 miles of biking and many months of fundraising all for the children and families at Mercy Children’s Hospital in Toledo. Leading up to Ziggython, the main event in April, BGSU’s Dance Marathon does a lot of fundraising.  The benefit dinner, held on Nov. 4 at 7 p.m., is a good example of the work they do throughout the year. Student tickets for the event were $30 per person or $250 dollars for a table that seats 10 people.  For people who are not students, tickets were $40 per person or $350 dollars for  a table that seats 10. In addition to ticket sales, Dance Marathon also raised money from t-shirt sales a raffle and bidding on gift baskets. Raffle tickets cost $1 and provided dinner guests with the opportunity to win prizes and gift baskets. Guests at the events could purchase raffle tickets and t-shirts at the beginning of the event and the raffle took place after the event. Dinner was served buffet style.  Tables were sent to get food one by one and once all the guests were seated again, the event moved on while guests ate. Throughout the evening, several members of Dance Marathon and staff members from Mercy Children’s Hospital spoke about how working with the hospital and Dance Marathon has affected them and how they got involved. In addition, a few of the miracle families spoke about their kids, their story, and about how Dance Marathon benefited and affected them. One of the miracle families who spoke were the Osborns.  They spoke about their daughter who was hospitalized a few years ago.  They spoke a lot about how the doctors and nurses were able and willing to make them feel calm in the uncertainty of their situation. The nurses also connected with their daughter and helped her feel more comfortable.  In addition to this, the hospital also provides toys and movies…


Art bus makes stop in Bowling Green

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Just out of graduate school metalsmith Autumn Brown had a problem finding a place to call home as an artist. Studio space to work and display her work was hard to find, expensive and came with landlord issues. “I was always trying to put my studio wherever I could.” Her own work focused on the combination of metalsmithing with ceramics. After working as a production jeweler, she decided to do her own venture making traditional jewelry “to pay the light bill.” Her business was Blue Onion, a tribute to her family that had roots in Vidalia, Georgia, the home of the sweet onion variety. She traces her interest to jewelry back to them. Her great-grandparents had a jewelry store and great grandmother who loved porcelain. She set up shop in an old restaurant, a studio with an “extremely rude” landlord, and shared space with other artist. Never settled, her jewelry and gear had to be ready to move with her to the next location. She notice as she moved around “all these buses” parked on farms. It was like schools “themselves” of their fleets. That got her thinking. About two years ago, she finally located a bus, on eBay, a 1985 International Harvester with less than 50,000 miles on it. She paid $2,600 for it. The bus had a varied history – a transport vehicle for the Air Force, a senior citizens bus, a hunting lodge and a home for a young couple. Her boyfriend and parents, “thought she was crazy.” Undeterred she set about transforming it into an artistic home on wheels, a place to work, teach and display her own and other artists’ jewelry. Now the Blue Onion Bus, BOB, is visiting Bowling Green. Brown was brought to campus by Bowling Green State University metals instructor Marissa Saneholtz, who knew her from graduate school. Brown gave a workshop on campus, and then set up a display of…


Attack, hate speech reported after election ‘whitelash’

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   After a long election season laden with hate speech, the results of Tuesday’s vote have left many populations feeling vulnerable and targeted. On Thursday, a BGSU student reported on Facebook that as she volunteered to collect election signs from yards on Crim Street, she was physically attacked and called racial slurs by men shouting they were “making America great again.” Bowling Green police are investigating the incident. On Wednesday evening, as a peaceful rally was held in the green space in downtown Bowling Green for those troubled by the election, Krishna Han said three teenage boys walked by yelling, “Black lives do not matter.” On Tuesday evening, a BGSU student from Tunisia explained during a city-university relations commission meeting, that international students are reporting threatening incidents to her, and worry about the climate created by the election. After years of inching toward inclusion, President-elect Donald Trump’s campaign “whitelash” is being blamed for legitimizing hatred toward many populations – Latinos, African Americans, the LGBTQ community, Muslims, women and more. “It was a pretty traumatic day,” BGSU student Allie Dyer said Thursday during a Not In Our Town meeting. “We are in very real danger now. We have to watch our backs now.” In response to the student reporting the attack on Crim Street, BGSU Vice President for Student Affairs and Vice Provost Thomas Gibson released a statement to all students. “BGSU is committed to ensuring that we have a welcoming and safe climate for all members of our community. We believe in the value of respecting one another, promoting diversity and being inclusive in making Bowling Green State University a place we can all be proud of and where our community members can thrive,” Gibson wrote. Gibson encouraged students to report incidents in person, online or by phone. He also urged that students attend a town hall meeting on Monday, at 6 p.m., in 101 Olscamp Hall, on…


Sit in promotes love, peace in a post-election time of fear

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News More than 200 students, faculty and community members gathered Thursday outside the Bowling Thompson Student Union on the name of peace and love. The event, organized after Tuesday’s tumultuous election, was by design a non-partisan event. The winner, Republican Donald Trump’s name was not spoken. But the words he spoke during his successful campaign still resonated with this crowd. Some were afraid for themselves or for their friends. Jacqueline Adams, graduate student in American Culture Studies, said she initiated the event because “a lot of folks on campus feel the need to create a loving and caring space. BGSU is a loving space we just want to sit here to remind ourselves of that.” Joanna Murphy, who was busy passing out cardboard and markers to make posters, said “we all just need to take a deep breath and be together, and promote solidarity or love” after a “volatile” election. The hope was to bridge the divide. Joey Sturgis said he was there to celebrate that BGSU was open to diversity and offered a spot for students to express themselves. “We’re very conscious about everything that’s going on in the country.” This gathering “was more intense,” he said. Beneath these expressions of peace and love was an undercurrent of fear. Murphy said she learned through social media that a black woman she knows was attacked early Wednesday morning by three men. The victim was wearing an Obama Hope t-shirt. The assailants were white. Murphy said, she didn’t know the motivation behind the attack. That wasn’t the only incident, she said. “A number of my friends who identify as Moslem, trans and people of color have experienced everything from death threats to harassment in the last 24 hours.” Adams noted recently that a racial slur was scrawled on the university’s Spirit Rock. “A lot of people who are hurting at our university,” said Shayna Swerdlow. She came to the sit in…


Housing crunch at BGSU changes plans for some juniors & seniors

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Juniors and seniors planning on living on campus next fall may have to make other arrangements. And some students with campus housing will be living across the tracks in an apartment complex in the 500 block of North Enterprise. The university is leasing the complex for five years from Greenbriar Properties. Because of the planned closing of Harshman Quadrangle, the university cannot guarantee on-campus housing to juniors and seniors, though it will be able to accommodate first year students and sophomores. “We won’t have enough beds,” said Sarah Waters, director of Residence Life. The closing of the last two buildings in the Harshman Quadrangle and the leasing of the Greenbriar complex will give BGSU beds for about 6,100 students, that’s about 400 less than this academic year. And no new dorm construction is in the wings. The university will take another look at its housing master plan next year with new construction maybe in 2020. Waters said about 600 juniors and seniors wish to live on campus. About 100 of those are residence hall advisors, and they will have rooms. “We want upper class leadership in the residence halls,” Waters said. About another 130 are in fraternities and sororities, and they can live in the Greek Village. The housing crunch comes as BGSU has started enrolling larger classes, and is striving to retain more of those students. That’s good news, she said. Older students won’t be completely shut out, however. Waters said the university knows that some students need to live on campus beyond their sophomore year. It may because of scholarships they receive or because of a disability. Students can apply for housing, and the university will try to accommodate them. She encouraged students to reach out to the Residence Life office. “We encourage students to fill out the application so that we can make decisions regarding their housing by early December. “ “BGSU recognizes that these changes to…


Sit in planned for noon today on campus

A sit in at Bowling Green State University will be held today (Thursday Nov. 10) from noon to 3 p.n. at the Union Oval just outside the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. The notice states: “Our goal is to show folks love wins and acts of violence will not be tolerated at BGSU. We aim to visibly take up space, and  I hope faculty and graduate students will lead in showing undergraduate students they’re not alone at BGSU.”


Immigrants take oath of citizenship in wake of bitter election

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The day after the son of an immigrant was elected president, 10 people took their oaths of citizenship at a naturalization ceremony at Bowling Green State University. It was the second year that Federal Judge James R. Kneff convened his court on campus to hold the naturalization session. Kneff said the timing of the ceremony was fitting. “This ceremony is a day to take a deep breath after an election cycle with a fair amount of acrimony – that probably doesn’t do it justice. Part of what happens after each election is … we have a period of healing and figuring out we agree about more than we disagree.” Those becoming citizens Wednesday and their counties of origin were: Iffat Almas, Pakistan; Adnan Hani Assaf, Lebanon; Barbara Gilchrist, Germany; Mohammad Sameh Kayed, Jordan; Hiba Kishli, Lebanon; Morgan Vincent Lee, People’s Republic of China; Deborah Carol Lynn and Robert Peter Schankula, Canada; and No Thi Tran, Vietnam. Kneff said that they were “exhibit A of why immigration, when done right, is important. We’re a nation of immigrants and I’m so proud to call you all my fellow citizens today.” A few months ago, Juan Pablo Bes, a BGSU math professor from Argentina, took the oath of citizenship. Those months though seemed longer because of the election. “It was a major experience.” He talked about how immigrants helped shape the country. Some like Alexander Graham Bell, from Scotland like President-Elect Donald Trump’s mother made notable contributions. Bell invented the telephone and founded the company that became AT&T. Immigrants founded other “iconic companies” including Procter and Gamble, DuPont, and Google, Bes said. “No less important is the impact of millions of ordinary Americans who through their work every day and their cultural diversity contribute to this society.” Bes said he and others becoming U.S. citizens feel an internal conflict.  He said they may feel that they are renouncing their culture, their place…


BGSU Arts Events through Nov. 23

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Through Nov. 21—“The Deathworks of May Elizabeth Kramner,” a mixed media installation by The Poyais Group, continues through Nov. 21 in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery in the Fine Arts Center. The exhibit purports to be a re-creation by the Poyais Group of outsider artist Kramner’s (1867-1977) private lifework, a tent version of the town where she lived, with each tent representing someone who had died. Discovered by a team of anthropologists after her death but then lost in a fire, the installation was remade by the Poyais Group (Jesse Ball, Thordis Bjornsdottir, Olivia Robinson and Jesse Stiles) based on notes by one of the original anthropologists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Through Nov. 22—“Criminal Justice?” an exhibit by activist artists Carol Jacobson and Andrea Bowers, investigates the attitudes and biases embedded in the U.S. criminal justice system. Jacobson is an award-winning social documentary artist whose works in video and photography address issues of women’s criminalization and censorship. Bowers’ video “#sweetjane” and drawings explore the 2012 Steubenville, Ohio, rape case and the citizens whose activism resulted in two rape convictions. The drawings reproduce the text messages sent among the teenage witnesses to the assault on an underage young woman. “Criminal Justice?” is on view in the Willard Wankelman Gallery at the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Nov. 9—The Faculty Artist Series continues with guitarist Ariel Kasler. Kasler has performed at venues and events as diverse as the Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto, the Detroit Jazz Festival, the Grand Theater in London, Ontario, the Clore Center for Music and Dance in Israel, New Music from Bowling Green, the NASA regional conference in Urbana-Champaign, the Victorian College of Arts in Australia and Rutman’s Violins in Boston. The recital will begin at…


Students come out to vote without much enthusiasm for their choices

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Voters casting their first votes for president were excited to go to the polls, even if they weren’t excited by their choices. Mallori Henderson, waiting to vote this afternoon, said “honestly wish there would be some other candidates for my first election.” She said she was ending up voting for Libertarian Gary Johnson. Neither Cori Hager nor Alexis McKinley were excited about their choices, but they still believed it was important to vote. “You have to express your opinion,” McKinley said. “This is the one thing we get to voice our opinion on,” Hager said. Tyanna Ebgerson said she felt all the candidates had their faults, “one more so than the other.” She said she was going to vote for Hillary Clinton. She felt the support for Clinton has been quieter on campus. Donald Trump supporter “are everywhere.” And then, she said, “some people aren’t going to vote because they think their one vote doesn’t make a difference.” Kayla Coats and John Haumwesser, of the Young Government Leaders, both said they were pleased with their choices, though neither would say how they voted. Their group was one of those sponsoring an election watch party in the student union theater.  The theater was packed. Both were pleased with the level of interest shown in the event. Coats said the election “is very liberating.” “It’s great to see what direction our country wants to go,” she said. Regardless of the outcome, she said, “America will continue to move on.” Kyle Lamb, man of the Campus Republicans, said he expected the race to be close. While he reluctantly supporting Trump, that vote was cast mostly, he said, because he disliked Clinton more. He felt a lot of people were voting more against someone. Either way the election went “I’m not going to be cheering.” As a country, he said, “we’ve got to unite.” The nation is too polarizes. “One of the biggest…


Faculty Senate acts on degrees in aviation, software engineering

 By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Bowling Green State University Faculty Senate last week took action on degrees in aviation and software engineering. Now students who study aviation at BGSU get a Bachelor’s of Science in Technology degree. That doesn’t reflect what they’ve spent four years studying, said Carl Braun, the liaison for the aviation program. When BGSU graduates apply for aviation jobs, they face questions about exactly what that degree means. “This helps the industry recognize Bowling Green as having an aviation program,” Braun said. For students, he said, “they finally get to have a reflection of their four years of hard work.” The new degree, Braun said, is simply a name change which he expects will go in place next fall. And despite requests by some alumni, it will not be retroactive. The senate also approved a new degree a Bachelor’s Science in Software Engineering. Robert Dyer, a professor of computer science, said there’s a growing need, about 17 percent a year, for software engineers. “We see a lot of demand in industry,” he said. “They want software engineers. … Software drives everything we do.” This will be only the second such program in the state, and one of the few in the region. Jake Lee, professor of computer science, said the course will require 40 credit hours with another nine electives. The curriculum was developed, he said, with an eye toward achieving accreditation by the Association of Computing Machinery. Both resolutions passed unanimously. At the meeting, Provost Rodney Rogers said BGSU was looking into adopting a 15-week semester. This comes as the University of Toledo and Owens Community College move to that calendar. The three institutions closely collaborate some programs. Having a 15-week semester would allow the university to offer a brief winter session in January during which students could take a course.    


Military Times: BGSU tops in Ohio for veterans

By BOB CUNNINGHAM BGSU Office of Marketing & Communications Bowling Green State University was named the top “Best for Vets 2017” university in Ohio by the Military Times. Military Times ranked BGSU 46th out of 130 four-year institutions in the nation, besting all other Ohio schools and remaining one of the top academic choices in the country for veterans and active-duty military personnel. “We are extremely proud to be considered among the best universities in the nation in making sure that student veterans have the necessary tools to succeed in academic life,” BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey said. “These rankings recognize Bowling Green State University’s dedication to helping current and former U.S. military personnel inside and outside of the classroom.” To be considered for “Best for Vets,” colleges had to fill out a survey of about 150 questions. Military Times evaluated schools’ responses plus other data collected by three federal agencies. Most colleges that filled out the survey didn’t make the 130-school cut, the publication said. BGSU also is among 42 schools in the new Peer Advisors for Veteran Education (PAVE) program, a peer-support system that connects new student veterans with on-campus student veterans to help adjust to university life. PAVE is a collaboration between the University of Michigan Depression Center and Department of Psychiatry and Student Veterans of America. “Best for Vets,” which regularly recognizes BGSU, evaluated schools in five categories: university culture, academic outcomes/quality, student support, academic policies and cost and financial aid. “The University has long been committed to making a college education a reality for veteran students,” said Barbara Henry, assistant vice president for nontraditional and military student services. “We are here to help make the transition from life in the military to life on a college campus as seamless and stress-free as possible.”


Mikel Kuehn takes listeners on walk through his musical landscape on new CD

  By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Mikel Kuehn likes to take hikes. Oak Openings is a favorite location. He favors the wilder, natural environment to a more manicured landscape – “the messiness of nature… the entanglement of vines.” “To me, it’s really beautiful,” the composer said. That carries through in his compositions. They have a deceptive tangle of sounds, lines that stretch into the musical undergrowth reaching up, seeking light. As in nature, what may seem a disorder of trees, vines, leaves and their shadows, has an underlying order. In his compositions, Kuehn said, he wants listeners to go on a walk with him and appreciate the unruly beauty of nature. Kuehn, now on the cusp of turning 50, has just released his first CD devoted to his compositions. “Object Shadow” was released by New Focus Recordings in October. The recording features seven compositions, most written between 2004 and 2014. The outlier is the composition that closes the recording, “Between the Lynes,” which dates to 1994. This is the earliest piece in which he explores the textures and techniques evident in the later work. “It’s one of the first I’m happy with,” he said. “The pieces are all virtuosic,” Kuehn, who has taught at Bowling Green State University since 1998, said.  The performers are “all perfect.” The CD opening and closes with performances by Ensemble Dal Niente, a Chicago-based new music group. The opening “Undercurrents” features the entire 14-piece ensemble. The title piece, albeit in French not English, “Objet/Ombre,” features a 12-saxophone ensemble from BGSU with electronics that shadow their sounds. Another leading new music group Flexible Music appears on “Color Fields.” Three solo pieces for cello and electronics, guitar and marimba round out the program. Kuehn said he was able to record the CD thanks to a Guggenheim Foundation grant and an award from the Ohio Arts Council. Without that money, he said, “I never would have been able to do it.” Recording…


Berlin Philharmonic concertmaster will be guest soloist with BGSU orchestra

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The Bowling Green State University Philharmonia will welcome violinist Noah Bendix-Balgley, concertmaster of the Berlin Philharmonic, for a return guest appearance Nov. 14. The program will feature two well-known pieces by Tchaikovsky, his Symphony No. 5 and Violin Concerto. The 8 p.m. performance will take place in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. A pre-concert talk on the music of Tchaikovsky will be held at 7:15 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall. Bendix-Balgley was appointed the Berlin Philharmonic’s concertmaster in 2014. He gave his first performance with the Bowling Green Philharmonia in 2015. Currently on a North American tour with the Berlin orchestra, he is making a side trip to Bowling Green to perform at BGSU. “We are absolutely thrilled to have Noah visiting Bowling Green to perform with the University’s orchestra, the BG Philharmonia. As one of America’s great violinists, having reached the pinnacle position of concertmaster of the world-renowned Berlin Philharmonic, he is an exceptional representative of the best our country has to offer in the classical music scene,” said Philharmonia conductor Dr. Emily Freeman-Brown, Professor of Creative Arts Excellence and BGSU director of orchestral activities. The opportunity for BGSU students to work with Bendix-Balgley is of great value, said Dr. William Mathis, interim dean of the College of Musical Arts. “Music students in the CMA have multiple opportunities to work with professional musicians throughout their degrees, but to have someone of Mr. Bendix-Balgley’s stature is a special treat to be sure,” Mathis said. “The impact of rehearsing, interacting and performing with a world-class artist is significant, motivating and inspiring — our students will never forget this experience. I daresay that the audience will never forget this concert, either.” Bendix-Balgley has built an international reputation as a violinist, appearing as a soloist with leading orchestras and in festivals winning top prizes in competitions in Europe and the United States. From 2011-15, he was concertmaster of the…


‘Gondoliers’ provides a comic & tuneful respite from dirty politics

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Maybe “The Gondoliers” is just what we need about now. With a political campaign rolling like a torrent of sludge to a messy conclusion, a frothy piece of social satire from another time is a welcomed diversion. The venerable team of Gilbert and Sullivan reminds us that being a doofus is just part of the human condition. Doesn’t matter if you’re royalty or gondolier, you are at heart a fool. But in the world of Gilbert and Sullivan even fools can spin off a tangle of intricate rhyme that precisely delineates the absurd world they inhabit. “The Gondoliers or the King of Barataria” was the team’s last hit back in the last decade of the 19th century. And Bowling Green State University Opera Theatre whips up a production that is true to the absurdist spirit of the original. The show is on stage tonight (Nov. 4) at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. on Kobacker Hall on campus. Advance tickets are $15 and $5 for students and children. All tickets the day of the performance are $20. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171 or at www.bgsu.edu/arts. The tale is a subversive fancy, so convoluted and contrived that when the character Luiz (Aaron Hill) repeats the story to Princess Casilda (Alissa Plenzler) she’s just as incredulous as the audience, though not nearly as amused. Casilda is the daughter of down-and-out royalty who married her off as a baby to a prince. When the prince’s family became Methodists “of the most bigoted and persecuting type,” the baby prince is whisked away by the Grand Inquisitor (Brett Pond) to Venice where he was placed with the family of a gondolier who had a son the same age. The father drank so much he forgot which boy was which, so now no one knows, except that stock figure in Gilbert and Sullivan operettas, the nurse. The entire play takes…


Faculty senate mulls options for cutting students’ textbook expense

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Bowling Green State University heard about many ways to reduce the cost of textbooks on Tuesday. When it came time to approve a resolution that called for formulating a plan by May, 2017, that would cut costs in half, the senate balked. Not that the senators weren’t behind cutting textbook costs. Rather they were concerned about committing to that specific target before the issue had been studied, as well as for procedural reasons. Gov. John Kasich and the Republican-controlled legislature have been pushing for reductions on the price of textbooks as part of efforts to reduce the cost of higher education for students. This concern comes at a time when the trend has been a significant decrease in state support for higher education. Universities did receive a modest increase in funding in the most recent budget. Before considering the resolution titled “To Lead Ohio Higher Education in Textbook Cost Reduction,” the senate heard from a panel about what is being done to control the cost of textbooks. Provost Rodney Rogers said that after the major expenses of tuition, fees, room and board are paid, students and their parents are then confronted with “additional costs that are pretty significant and sometimes it surprises families.” Jeff Nelson, the manager of the University bookstore, said that the timing of when professors decide what materials they will use is key. The earlier, the better, he said. Through BGSU Choose, price comparison software, the bookstore gives students information on what books and materials cost at the bookstore and at 12 other national vendors, including Amazon. As soon as the bookstore knows what books will be required it can do the research, he said. The system also “gives us a lot of data and analytics.” Sometimes that information leads the bookstore to discount the price of some textbooks. He said that 85 percent of students who use BGSU Choose end up buying something from the…