Campus

BGSU sees slip in student retention rate

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   BGSU’s student retention rate slipped this fall, sending officials scrambling to find ways to help students stay at school. It’s not enough for Bowling Green State University to attract new students to come to school. The university has to keep them coming back for more – until they graduate. That’s because universities in Ohio no longer get state funding per student headcounts. Now they get paid if students return to school each year and earn diplomas. So the recent dip in returning students at BGSU was concerning Friday to the BGSU Board of Trustees. Last fall, the retention rate was 77.5 percent. This fall, the rate of returning students had dropped to 75.8 percent – creating a bigger gap between reality and the retention goal of 80 percent. “Obviously, we’re not satisfied,” said BGSU Provost Rodney Rogers. “The goal is 80 percent, so we will continue to work on that.” Retention rates dropped for on-campus students (78.4 to 76.5 percent) and for commuter students (67.9 to 64.7 percent.) Meanwhile, several other universities in Ohio were meeting their goals of 80 percent or higher retention rates, Rogers said. Rates at Ohio University, Ohio State University, Miami University and Kent State were all higher than BGSU, while the University of Toledo’s rate was lower. But Rogers assured that BGSU could achieve the higher rate. “That 80 percent is a very appropriate goal for us,” he said. BGSU Trustees President David Levey questioned how the university would meet the goal. “Everybody’s focused on retention and our numbers are slipping,” he said. “What are we going to do this year?” However, Trustee Dan Keller cautioned the…


Ice Arena investment skates by BGSU Trustees

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Six years ago, the Falcon hockey program was teetering on the edge of the BGSU budget chopping block. But today, the Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees voted unanimously to spend $2.7 million to keep the operation on ice. The money will pay for a new ice plant and replacement of the concrete floor under the main and auxiliary ice at the Ice Arena on Mercer Road. There was no debate about spending the money – with it being noted that the BGSU hockey team is ranked 14th in the nation this year. The concrete floor and ice plant are original to the Ice Arena, which was built in 1967. The facility saw its first upgrade in 1989 with expansion of the seating area, then in 2001 with some office and lounge space being added. In 2010, some roof, gutter, restroom, humidity and lighting changes were made, and later the parking lot and sound system were improved. There were upgrades to the locker rooms, concession area and awnings added out front. And this year, hockey fans will notice a new video score board in the arena. The ice plant and concrete will have to wait until next summer to be replaced, so the work doesn’t interrupt hockey season. Sheri Stoll, BGSU vice president of finance, stressed the need for the improvements. “Our operating costs will increase significantly” if the work isn’t done, she told the trustees. Though the university is prepared to pay for the projects, Stoll said donations are always welcome. “We’d be happy to accept any private donations for this,” she said. Also at Friday’s meeting, the BGSU Trustees…



High school robotics teams to compete at BGSU Oct. 8

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Teams of students from 17 area high schools and middle schools will showcase their talents during the fourth annual Falcon BEST Robotics competition Oct. 8 at Bowling Green State University. Area schools with teams competing this year are: Anthony Wayne High School, Bowling Green High School, Cardinal Stritch Catholic High School, EHOVE Career Center, Hamilton Southeastern High School, Maumee Valley Country Day School, McComb High School, Millstream Career Center, Patrick Henry High School, Paulding High School, Perrysburg High School, Port Clinton High School, Sandusky Central Catholic School, St. Francis de Sales School, St. Ursula Academy, Sylvania Southview High School, and Vanguard Technology Center. Game Day kicks off in the Stroh Center at 9:30 a.m. with opening ceremonies, which will include a welcome and parade of robots. The competition will follow at 10 a.m. as the teams and their robots master Bet the Farm 2016, a competition of skill and strategy. The event will conclude with awards at approximately 3:15 p.m. The public is encouraged to attend Game Day to support the teams and their robots as they compete; all events are free. Students are coached by dedicated and enthusiastic teachers and team mentors, some of which come from the professional tech community. Each team is provided with an identical kit of parts and equipment, and then spends a month and a half designing, building and testing a remote-controlled robot that the team expects to outperform those created by its competition. The BEST Award is presented to the top three teams that exemplify the concept of BEST – Boosting Engineering, Science and Technology. Criteria include creativity, teamwork, sportsmanship, diversity of participation, application of the…


Piano concert, job coaching all on tap at public library

From WOOD COUNTY DISTRICT PUBLIC LIBRARY The library’s popular “Job Coach,” HR expert Frank Day, will be available Wednesday, October 5 starting at 9:30 am to provide advice on polishing your resume, exploring online job sites, or filling out an online application. Please call ahead, 419-352-5050,  to make an appointment for your half-hour session with Mr. Day. “Tablet and Smartphone Classes,” presented in partnership with the Wood County Committee on Aging and the BGSU School of Media and Communications, will be held Tuesday, October 4 and 11 at 6:15 pm in the 2nd Floor Meeting Room. These classes are structured to suit your needs and to help you to get the most from your phone or mobile device. Registration is required. For details and to register call the Senior Center at 419-353-5661. A popular concert series which showcases graduate students in piano studies at BGSU’s College of Musical Arts returns to the WCDPL Atrium on Monday October 3 at 7 pm. The program features three centuries of keyboard classics from composers such as Bach, Beethoven, Rachmaninoff, Liszt, and Chopin. WCDPL’s full programming calendar, including youth programs and scheduling and selections for its popular book discussion groups during the month of October may be seen on line at wcdpl.org/calendar. These events are free and open to all. For more details about these and other programs for adults at WCDPL, call the library at 419-352-5050.


Kids with special needs benefit from challenge of sports through Rally Cap

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The turf room in Field House at Bowling Green State University is full of voices on Sunday afternoon. Lower voices of parents murmur from the bleachers along the wall near the door. Spread across the green before them are the encouraging, sometimes cheering, voices of college students. Rising above it all are the high, happy chatter of children at play. All this is punctuated the sounds of balls bouncing and being kicked. Welcome to a new season of Rally Cap Sports. The program, now in its fourth year, offers individual sports experiences in a non-competitive environment to children with a range of special needs, said Melissa Wilson, a BGSU senior who directs the program. Sunday’s kickoff marked the start of the program’s fourth year on campus. A few dozen kids are spread out around the turf room, each working with two or three college students. This kickoff, Wilson said, serves as an introduction for new participants, and a welcome back for participants from previous years. After Sunday there will be a basketball league this fall as well as a couple dances. For information contact: www.rcsbgsu.org. The program serves children with a wide range of needs, she said. Some are non-verbal, while others have mild learning disabilities. About 70 have participated to date. For all of them, sports in another setting is not a possibility. Jodi Clifford said her children are unable to play sports either at school or in private programs because of a variety of disabilities including bilateral coordination issues. “But coming here they enjoy it. They look forward to it. They don’t feel left out. They feel part of the team.” Cicely…


BGSU Lively Arts Calendar, Sept. 28 – Oct. 12

From BGSU Office of Marketing & Communications  At the Galleries –“Face It: Reimagining Contemporary Portraits” continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery in the Fine Arts Center. “Face It” explores an expanded definition of photographic portraiture. Curated by BGSU art faculty Lynn Whitney and Andrew Hershberger and BGSU Galleries Director Jacqueline Nathan, the exhibit features photos by 27 renowned artists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free. Sept. 29 – Award-winning author and book critic John Freeman will read from his works as a part of the Visiting Writer Series. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Sept. 29 – TheInternational Film Series continues with “Abrazos (Embraces),” directed by Luis Argueta. A group of children travel from Minnesota to Guatemala to meet their grandparents for the first time. The film documents their pilgrimage, exploring family, heritage and immigration. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Sept. 29 – BGSU composition students will present their works at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 30 – TheBGSU Wind Symphony will be in concert at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. On the program are “Skating on the Sheyenne,” by Ross Lee Finney; “Et Exspecto Resurrectionem Mortuorum,” by Olivier Messiaen, and “First Symphony for Band” by William Bolcom. Advance tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for students. All tickets the day of the concert are $10. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171 or visit…


Face It exhibit at BGSU takes intimate look at portrait photography

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News   Photographic portraits have always had their allure. Think of those ghostly images staring back at you from 19th century daguerreotypes. Viewers will find the contemporary descendants of those models in Face It: Reimagining Contemporary Portraits now on exhibit at the Bryan Gallery in the Fine Arts Building on the Bowling Green State University campus. Recently this reporter was treated to a tour of the show accompanied by the three curators and two photographers who have work in the exhibit. The seed for Face It was planted with a passing remark by Jacqui Nathan, the gallery director, to Lynn Whitney, who teaches photography at BGSU. How about a portrait show? Nathan asked. That casual suggestion took a couple years to gestate, but with the help of art historian Andrew Hershberger it has now come to fruition. Photo portraits are “very common,” he said, “Very familiar.” We carry them around with us in our wallets, on our telephones. We have identification cards with portraits on them. And we treasure them. In the event of a disaster, after family and pets are safe, people will grab the family portraits. “Arguably this is most common type of photography ever,” he said. “Yet they remain mysterious.” Back in the days of daguerreotypes, “people were frightened of these portraits,” Hershberger said. “The kind of impact portraits can have is pretty dramatic.” That pull is evident in Face It, whether it is the tightly cropped images of photographer Nicholas Nixon and his wife, who in a couple images peers surreptitiously out at the viewer or Greg Miller’s photos of children waiting for the school bus in Connecticut. Those photos were…


Students pack the house to watch Clinton-Trump debate

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Even before Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump arrived on the stage at Hofstra University Monday night, a clear winner was evident at Bowling Green State University. The organizers of a debate watch party brought in a standing room only crowd that had them bringing in stacks of chairs into the designated room in the student union, and then redirecting some students down the hall to an overflow room. The pizza? Gone in minutes. About 200 students were drawn to the first faceoff between the major party candidates. The banter back and forth was evident as they waited for the telecast to begin, as were the Trump-Pence and Love Trumps Hate signs. Once the debate started, though, the students were quiet. Some exchanges drew laughs as when early on Clinton turned to her opponent and said: “Donald, it’s great to be with you.” And the Republican smirked in response. The largest applause came when Clinton retorted after Trump criticized her taking time off the campaign trail to prepare for the debate that: “I’m prepared to be president. I think that’s a good thing.” The crowd grew more vocal as the debate neared its conclusion including one Trump supporter who shouted that Clinton “was a pig.” Then as soon as the event was over they headed for the exit. A few did linger long enough to comment on what their reactions to the debate were. Flint Porter said the debate confirmed his negative view of the two major party candidates. “I thought it was ridiculous,” he said. “Both candidates proved they were not eligible candidates to be running for president. They made a mockery of our…


NIOT plans ‘Real Talk with Real Cops’ at BGSU

(As submitted by Not In Our Town BG) Not In Our Town BG stands with all who grieve following the deaths in Tulsa and Charlotte last week.  We also witness to the deep feelings of anger, frustration and fear that these events have generated among people of color and others here in Bowling Green and on campuses and in communities around the country. One of our NIOT cornerstones remains our commitment both to truth-telling and to improving the relations of our BG and BGSU police with the Bowling Green community at large.  We continue to support “coffee with cops” events, and we highlight the coming community/police conversation called “It’s Just Us:  Real Talk with Real Cops.”  This will take place Friday Oct. 14 in the theater (room 206) of BGSU’s Bowen Thompson Student Union at 6 p.m.  There is no overstating the importance of open and honest communication with and by our officers, particularly involving those who have reason to be fearful due to current and past events. The tragedies of last week underscore the value of the cooperation and the partnership of the two police departments with NIOT-BG since our origin.  But they also show that we in Bowling Green must continue with the hard work required to reject prejudice and violence in our town, and to become a community in which all people are not just included but are respected and safe.  


Silent Witness unveiling set for Oct. 4

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS In recognition of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, the Bowling Green State University Women’s Center has announced the unveiling of the 2016 collection of the northwest Ohio chapter of the Silent Witness Project. The evening will include an address by keynote speaker Paula Walters, a certified paramedic, domestic violence survivor and founder of Standing Courageous, Inc. Walters will share her personal story and honor the family and friends of local domestic violence victims who did not survive. She also will invite audience members to join her effort to convince legislators of the need for a Violence Offender Registry, which would allow citizens to be informed about those who are habitually dangerous to others. The event will begin at 7 p.m. Oct. 4 at Parkway Place, 2500 Parkway Plaza in Maumee. It is free and open to the public; however, due to the intense nature of the program, organizers ask that those in attendance do not bring young children. The 2016 Silent Witness Project collection includes 62 free-standing, life-sized wooden silhouettes, each one bearing the name and story of a girl or woman whose life ended violently at the hands of a husband, boyfriend, dating partner or stalker. All Silent Witnesses in the collection were from northwest Ohio and all were murdered within the past decade. During the unveiling, the silhouettes will be revealed one by one in a solemn ceremony. Each Silent Witness will be represented by an individual reader, who will recount the story of the girl or woman represented by that figure. The Silent Witness Project is a national initiative, founded in 1990 in Minnesota, in response to an epidemic of domestic…


Hollywood star America Ferrera tells students: The stakes are high in this election

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News TV and movie star America Ferrera knows what a lot of immigrant kids are going through these days. When she was 9 and living in California’s San Fernando Valley, the state’s voters were considering Prop 187 which would have barred all undocumented immigrants from receiving any public services including education. That was the first election she remembered. Now in the midst of another campaign with high stakes, Ferrera is touring the country to encourage people to register to vote, and then cast ballots for Hillary Clinton. She stopped by Bowling Green State University Sunday morning to give a pep talk to several dozen students preparing to go out and canvass the neighborhoods around campus. The community Ferrera lived in was diverse. She was a first generation America. Her parents came from Honduras. “My friends were first generation all kinds of things,” she said. Their parents came from Vietnam, China, Latin American countries, and Arab countries. At home they ate different kinds of foods and their parents “yelled at us in different languages,” Ferrara said. “But when we went to school we were all Americans because we pledged allegiance to the flag.” They all thought of themselves as “true-blooded Americans,” and “we all deserved justice and to be treated in the same way.” But in 1994 with Prop 187 on the ballot children were being questioned and taunted and threatened. Ferrera hadn’t experienced any of that but her mother took her aside to warn her and tell her if anyone ever questioned her to know: “You didn’t do anything wrong. You belong here.” For the first time in her life, Ferrera felt different from her…


Policing expert: Releasing shooting videos is problematic

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In the wake of fatal police shootings in Charlotte, North Carolina, and Tulsa, Oklahoma, citizens are again demanding that police release the videos of the incidents. In Charlotte, where demonstrations have been violent at times, protestors have chanted “release the tapes” of the fatal shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. (Police Saturday decided make available two videos from police cameras.) Phil Stinson, Bowling Green State University professor in criminal justice and leading expert on policing, said he understands those calls. “I can fully understand from a point of public policy why these videos need to get out for transparency.” However, “if I was a prosecutor I would not want these videos out before trial, certainly not before the investigation was completed,” he said.  “It really does hamper the investigations when the videos get out quickly.” Not releasing the videos “suggests that they’re not necessarily hiding something, but they are pursuing the investigation.” What troubles Stinson is the some of the videos “show law enforcement officers acting in ways not consistent with their training.” Often, he said, “the narrative provided by the officers on the scene and those involved in the shooting are inconsistent with the video evidence. Either they’re lying or their recollections are flawed, which is not surprising given people are not very good at remembering things.” Stinson said it’s probably a combination of those two factors, false reports and mistaken perceptions. “An officer may believe there was an imminent threat of serious bodily injury or deadly force, but they could have been mistaken.” Whether the shooting is justified comes down to whether that fear “is objectively reasonable,” whether an officer acting according to…


Carl Allen spreads the love of jazz in Bowling Green

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Jazz drummer and producer Carl Allen told some of those war stories young jazz payers love to hear during his visit to Bowling Green State University. Anecdotes about being in the studio with their musical heroes. About being back stage with a legend like Art Blakey – and getting a life lesson. And the students came ready to play for him, so he could share some of the knowledge he’s accumulated over the years. On Thursday night those in the two big bands, even got the chance to perform with his inimitable beat getting them in the groove. But the stories, the notes, even the groove, was not the main lesson Allen had to share “It’s about love,” he told the students. That’s what he and all the other visiting artists who come to campus are about, the musician said. They love the music, and they want to share that love with students. Whatever criticism he had of their playing, he told those in a master class for jazz combos, was delivered in that spirit. The same spirit in which Blakey brought him up short when Allen was 23 and complained about a drum set provided on a gig. “Do you play the drums or do the drums play you?” Blakey, who’d used the same set, asked him. The way the young musicians can reciprocate is by asking questions. That’s what Allen did when he first arrived on the scene in New York while still a student at William Patterson College in New Jersey. An older drummer told him they let him into the fraternity of jazz drummers because he clearly loved the music….


Wendy Manning appointed president elect of national population association

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Dr. Wendy Manning, Distinguished Research Professor of sociology, is president-elect of the Population Association of America (PAA). She was elected to the position at the association’s recent conference. Manning, who is director of BGSU’s Center for Family and Demographic Research and co-director of the National Center for Family and Marriage Research (NCFMR), begins her term in January 2017 and will be president in 2018. Her key duties include organizing the 2018 annual meeting and delivering the 2018 presidential address. “I am honored and excited about the position,” Manning said. She has been actively involved with PAA, serving on several committees, as a member of the board and as vice president. She credits the visibility and strong reputation of BGSU and her colleagues as an important factor in winning the election. Manning is a family demographer; her research examines how family members define and understand their obligations to each other in an era of increasingly diverse and complex family relationships. She led the research for the ASA Amicus Brief filed to the U.S. Supreme Court in same-sex marriage cases. She has examined the meaning of cohabitation with her work on the measurement of cohabitation, fertility in cohabiting unions, the stability of cohabiting unions, transitions to marriage and implications of cohabitation for adult and child well-being. Her work has focused on adolescent sexual decision-making as well as the patterning and quality of young adult relationships. “This is a significant achievement in Wendy’s exceptionally distinguished career,” said Dr. Susan Brown, NCFMR co-director with Manning and chair of the Department of Sociology. “Simply put, she is a luminary in demography. Her election as PAA president affirms the high esteem…