Community

Group against BG school levy fails to file finance report

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The citizens group opposed to the Bowling Green City Schools levy in May has failed to file its campaign finance report with the Wood County Board of Elections. Friday at 4 p.m. was the statewide deadline for political action committees to file reports listing those who contributed to election efforts, and how that money was spent. The group that supported the school levy – Citizens in Support of Our Schools, with Andy Newlove as treasurer – filed its report on Friday morning. The group against the levy – Wood County Citizens Against Higher Property Tax, with Grant Chamberlain as treasurer – did not submit its report by the deadline. It is unusual for a PAC to not comply with the Ohio Revised Code requirement, said Carol DeJong, director at the Wood County Board of Elections. “I have not had this experience with a PAC that didn’t file,” especially on such a high-profile election issue, DeJong said on Friday after the deadline passed. The penalty for not filing can be up to $100 a day, she added. According to the Ohio Campaign Finance Handbook, if a required report is filed late, then the county board of elections or the secretary of state must refer the PAC to the Ohio Elections Commission. The commission determines if a fine should be imposed. Both pro and anti school levy groups filed the initial required campaign finance reports at the end of April. Those reports showed the contributions and expenditures through the period up to 20 days before the election. The post election reports due Friday are to show the money taken in and spent following the first report filed in April. In their initial reports, the anti-levy group had raised $10,866 from nine donors. The pro-levy group had raised $14,175 from 32 donors. In the campaign finance report filed Friday by the Citizens in Support of Our Schools, three contributions were recorded: Becca Ferguson, $100; David Codding, $2,500; and Control Systems of Ohio, $1,000. Wood County Board of Elections Director Terry Burton explained in April that campaign finance law requires any Political Action Committee to report its finances. The reports must include where the money comes from – both in financial contributions and in-kind donations which are products or services that benefit the cause. The school levy was a highly controversial issue, and failed for the second time in May. Reporting of the campaign contributors raised some concerns by citizens who felt that information should be private or should not be…


Law’s exhibit celebrates nature & the flowering of community

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Painting wasn’t enough for Rebecca Louise Law when she was an art student. As much as she loved the richness of painting, she longed for something more immersive. She tried installations, including some horrendous efforts involving food. Law found what she was looking for in her father’s garden – dahlias. Fifteen years after that first flower-based installation, “Dahlias,” the English artist has created an installation that she said most fully realizes her vision. Law’s “Community” opened Saturday in the Toledo Museum of Art’s Canaday Gallery. The site specific work was created over the past several weeks by Law, her four-member team, and more than 400 local volunteers. It uses 520,000 dried flowers. Of those 10,000 were harvested locally, including some from the museum’s grounds. The rest are the flowers used in her previous 51 installations. She saves everything. After an installation’s run, everything is boxed up for future use, even the dust that the flowers eventually become. These are encased in glass. She will return to Toledo in September for a residency at the Glass Pavilion working with that dust. On Saturday, Law discussed the evolution of her work with the museum’s Director of Curatorial Affairs Halona Norton-Westbrook who curated “Community.” Growing up in the countryside near Cambridge, England, she spent her time in the fields and fens. If it wasn’t raining her mother sent her and her siblings out to play. If they were inside often it was among the dried flowers in the attic. Law went on to study painting. “I felt incredibly frustrated. I wanted to work outside the canvas. I couldn’t figure out how to paint in the air.” Then she had her epiphany. Law started to “paint” with flowers. That led her to discover and study a whole new world of botany. “Personally I’m blown away by nature,” Law said. “That’s my ultimate inspiration. The more I know, the less I know.” The flowers are draped across the Canaday’s ceiling and hang down to the floor. From the entry the effect is a shimmering tableau. Then the viewer walks into the scene to be among the blossoms. During a press preview on Friday Law explained that she stands back while others arrange the flowers at her direction. The arrangement is guided by mathematics and aesthetics. Saturday Law said of the effect she seeks: “I suppose it’s spiritual, the presence of the beauty of what we have here on earth.” Last December Law visited the museum to finalize the details for the exhibit. She was…


Firefly Nights takes wing with well-received opening street fair

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Firefly Nights, a series of summer festivals spearheaded by a groups of downtown businesswomen, got a huge boost from Mother Nature. Clear skies and temperatures in Goldilocks range, neither too hot nor too cold, set the tone for what organizers and visitors alike declared a success, Friday night. Hundreds of people enjoyed music, shopping, craft booths, activities for children, food, beverages and just hanging out with friends and neighbors, along two blocks of Main Street that were closed to traffic for the evening.. “It was beyond good, it was exceptional. It literally brought tears to all of our eyes to see the overwhelming amount of support we have in the community,” said Stacie Banfield, the owner of Mode Elle Boutique. She along with Laura Wicks, of Grounds for Thought, Kati Thompson, Eden Fashion Boutique, and Gayle Walterbach, of Coyote Beads, banded together early this year to discuss a summer community celebration in downtown. Firefly Nights was launched. Late Friday as they started wrapping up the event, Thompson and Banfield reflected on the first street festival. “This exceeded all our expectations,” Thompson said. “It’s all we could have hoped for and it happened on the first night. Amazing.” The organizers recruited other businesswomen and a mixed-gender crew of 80 to 100 volunteers to help stage the event. Those interested in lending a hand can visit fireflynightsbg.com to volunteer. As director of the Bowling Green State University student union, part of Patrick Nelson’s job is to bring visitors to campus. He was impressed by the response to Firefly Nights. “Bowling Green is alive and well tonight,” he said “You couldn’t ask for a better first night.” He and his family, including visitors from New Mexico, came downtown. His family from out of state wondered: “Is it like this every night?” Nelson said he hoped people got a chance to visit the downtown businesses that stayed open late to reacquaint themselves with what’s here. Even as closing hour approached, customers were still coming into Finder’s Records. The store had stayed open an hour later, something it does for Record Store Day and the Black Swamp Arts Festival, and now Firefly Nights. “It’s been very positive for our business,” said clerk Marissa Medley. “It’s really fun.” Zach Baroudi, the owner of Kabob-It, also gave the event a thumbs up He had a food stall out on Main Street. “Everything was perfect,” he said. “Good for the community, good for us, good for surrounding restaurants. We’re very happy with it.” He did a brisk…


BG women protest separation of children and parents seeking asylum

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The Bowling Green women piled into an SUV Thursday afternoon and headed for Detroit to be part of a national protest against a U.S. policy they called inhumane. The numbers aren’t exact, but it’s been estimated that nearly 2,000 children have been separated from their parents at the U.S. border with Mexico in the last six weeks. The Trump administration has said it is simply following the law. But opponents say there is no law requiring that children be taken from parents who are seeking asylum in the U.S. “This is immoral,” said Janet Parks as the Bowling Green women headed up Interstate 75 in Tom Baer’s BG Airport Shuttle. Parks was joined by Joan Callecod, Beatriz Maya, Debra Nicholson, Sandy Rowland and Amanda Schackow – a retired educator, accountant, realtor, retail manager, writer and community advocate. “I’m ashamed of what our country is doing by separating families,” Rowland said. For some, the protest was personal. “I know several people who came here as asylum cases,” Schackow said. “Thinking about their children being taken away is really horrific.” As the SUV continued north, the women talked about tango classes, knitting, travels and food. But the conversation kept circling back to the injustice of children being separated from their parents. “I keep thinking about the trauma the children are going through,” Callecod said. “These are people. These are not animals,” Nicholson said. Maya, originally from Argentina, finds it hard to fathom the harm caused by the separations. “It is unbelievable that somebody can do this. It’s the most horrific thing,” Maya said. These families seeking asylum in the U.S. have made great sacrifices getting here – many trying to escape life-threatening situations, she said. “I went through a dictatorship in Argentina. It is already frightening to be an immigrant,” Maya said. “Do you know what it is to lose your kids to foster care and never know what happened to them?” The Bowling Green women joined about 300 other protesters outside the gates of the immigration detention center in Detroit. As they lined Jefferson Street and encouraged vehicles to honk, the protestors held signs saying things like: Immigrant rights are human rights. No more families torn apart. Hate does not make U.S. great. We’ve seen this before (with a Jewish star.) Nazis also took children away. Compassion not cruelty. Unless you are a descendant of Crazy Horse, what right do you have to be anti-immigrant. Family separation is not an American value. Families belong together – Sincerely, a…


BG, BGSU to host Ohio Town & Gown Summit

From BG CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU Bowling Green and Bowling Green State University were chosen to be the hosts of the Third Annual Ohio Town and Gown Summit this summer.  The summit is scheduled for Wednesday, July 18 through Friday, July 20, at the Bowen-Thompson Student Union on the campus of Bowling Green State University.  The summit provides an opportunity for networking and learning more about successful strategies and best practices for universities and their host communities to work together to create a cohesive and thriving community. Discussions and presentations will be designed to strengthen the relationships between Ohio higher education institutions and their respective municipalities, along with focusing on the unique opportunities and challenges that have been minimized with specific approaches.   Bowling Green Mayor Richard A. Edwards and BGSU President Rodney Rogers will provide the welcoming to the approximately 250 attendees anticipated.  BGSU President Emeritus Mary Ellen Mazey will be the keynote speaker during lunch on Thursday, July 19, which will focus on Bowling Green’s relationship from a comprehensive, community-wide visioning process to implementation and how the relationship has strengthened through the visioning process.  Bowling Green and BGSU have much to be proud of and to celebrate with the wide-ranging partnerships that have been created to best serve both the interests of the university, city and their constituents. The summit will also offer the opportunity to reflect on the progression of partnerships and brainstorm ways to further collaborate.     A broad variety of attendees will likely include elected officials, city planners, safety officials, city administrators, community ambassadors, higher education professionals, college students and downtown, chamber and visitor organizations to discuss important topics and opportunities related to community and university relations.   Committees comprised of city, community, and higher education officials have been meeting to coordinate the logistics of this large event and to develop programming that will be informative, meaningful, and include presenters from across the state of Ohio. There will also be opportunities for the attendees to tour the campus and community to highlight the many exciting and unique features of both the campus and community.  The planning committee is working on special programming to bring attendees to local businesses and attractions, especially to the beautiful historic downtown Bowling Green. The group will be invited to attend the next Best Hometown Celebration that will be hosted at the Simpson Building & Park on Thursday, July 19 from 4:30-6:30 pm.   The idea for the Town and Gown Summit originated when representatives from Ohio attended the 2015 International Town and Gown Association (ITGA) conference…


Citizens pledge to protect seniors from abuse, neglect

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   As local residents joined in the “Pause for the Pledge” of Allegiance on Thursday morning, they also pledged to protect vulnerable senior citizens from elder abuse. Last year in Wood County, 338 cases of elder abuse, neglect and exploitation were investigated. That number had jumped from 260 cases the year before. “No senior citizen should ever have to be worried about theft or abuse,” Wood County Prosecuting Attorney Paul Dobson said during a program outside the Wood County Senior Center. Marc Briseno, supervisor of adult protective services in Wood County, said the number of elder abuse cases in the county continue to rise – probably due to the growing older population and the awareness being spread. The number for people to report suspected abuse, neglect or exploitation is 419-354-9669. Wood County Commissioner Doris Herringshaw talked about the overall impact of elder abuse – with approximately 5 million cases investigated every year nationally. These are “valued members of our community,” she said. Dobson referred to senior citizens as “precious gifts.” “Everything that we have today is because of someone who came before us,” he said. It is up to members of the community to be aware of elder abuse and neglect, and to report concerns so the prosecutor’s office can do its job to protect older residents, Dobson said. “We in law enforcement will continue to defend our senior citizens,” he said. State Sen. Randy Gardner and State Rep. Theresa Gavarone, both R-Bowling Green, commended Dobson for his efforts, and recognized Wood County Committee on Aging Executive Director Denise Niese for her recent state award for serving seniors. Gardner and Gavarone mentioned the $1.6 million in state capital funds that will be put toward a new senior center in Bowling Green. And Niese recognized the support of the community and elected officials in serving seniors. It takes a “team effort,” she said, to serve “the most vulnerable population.” Following is a list from the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services on what is considered elder abuse: Neglect occurs when an individual’s basic needs for safety and well-being (such as medical care, adequate nutrition, socialization) are not being met. This can be through the action or inaction of the individual or another person. Exploitation is the unlawful or improper use of another person’s resources for monetary or personal benefit, profit or gain. People who exploit older adults can range from total strangers to trusted friends and family members. Physical abuse is the intentional use of physical force that…


Stay tuned: Jerry Anderson stepping down from anchor seat

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   For decades now, he has been the voice and the face that people have turned to for their news. But on Friday, Jerry Anderson will be stepping away from his news anchor role at WTOL in Toledo. He is, above all, a storyteller. Happy or sad. Simple or complex. Anderson is masterful at bringing the news into our homes and making us want to listen. How it all started Anderson’s parents lived in South Toledo when he was born. But his grandmother lived on Parker Avenue in Bowling Green, right next to Wood County Hospital. Even that has become a story for the newsman. “So they would drop off the kids at Grandma’s, and Mom would go next door to pop out another one,” Anderson said with a grin. When he was 16, his family moved to Bowling Green, and he graduated from Bowling Green High School. His first taste of the news profession occurred when at age 10, he delivered the morning Toledo Times newspaper. “One of our customers was a radio station,” Anderson said. “It was the station playing the music we listened to in the 60s. We could look in the big window and see the disc jockeys keying up the records with the big hole in the middle.” Every morning, newscaster Bob Kelly would read a comic strip from the newspaper for his radio listeners. So Anderson felt he had a vital role in delivering that comic strip on time. Then as he continued on his route, Anderson would attach his transistor radio to his handlebars and listen to the newscast. “I would pedal down Heatherdowns pretending to be the newscaster,” he said. “I was such nerd.” His interest in news came naturally, with him attending rallies with his dad for Nixon and for Goldwater. “I was always a kid who followed the news. I followed politics as a kid,” he said. And he always had the gift of gab. “I was one of five kids. I had to speak up.” Anderson gets his voice With no real experience, Anderson got his first job in radio at WFOB in 1974. He often told the joke that he was paid “weakly” – a paycheck of $82.86 every Friday. He spent four years at WFOB, coming in after Bill Blair, and being followed by Dave Horger. “I got sandwiched in between two Bowling Green classics,” Anderson said. In 1978, he moved to WSPD Radio in Toledo, then made the jump in 1980 to Channel 13…


Niese awarded for meeting changing needs of seniors

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Old age is not the equivalent of being obsolete, according to Denise Niese, executive director of the Wood County Committee on Aging. That attitude led Niese to her career in gerontology. “I always enjoyed the population,” Niese said. “This is back when people didn’t know how to spell gerontology – let alone have degrees in it.” That attitude has now led Niese to an award from the Ohio Association of Senior Citizens named after a predecessor in her profession – Muriel Bertsch. “She was an amazing woman,” Niese said of Bertsch, the founder of the first senior center in Ohio in 1954. The facility – called Partners in Prime – is still in existence. Bertsch also was instrumental in passage of the Older Americans Act in 1965. “She advocated for seniors,” Niese said. “She was a community organizer before community organizing was a vocation.” And now Niese has received an award for following in Bertsch’s footsteps. “We would like to honor you for all you have done to protect Ohio’s most vulnerable persons, including our senior citizens,” the Ohio Association of Senior Citizens wrote to Niese. Niese took over as director of the Wood County Senior Center in 2005. She not only enjoys the population she serves, but also the administration and policies involved. “That reinforces why you are doing what you do,” she said. “Our constituents are apt to let us know if we’re not doing it right.” The needs of seniors have changed just in the time Niese has been in the profession. The population is growing, and the changes in health insurance often send seniors home from the hospital when they still have significant needs. So there is more demand for medical services and physical accommodations in seniors’ homes. Many seniors are more willing to have assessments done to make sure they stay mentally sharp. Many more are staying home longer, so they need home-delivered meals. Programming has to meet a broad swath of needs – from exercises for 50-year-olds, to meals for those over age 100. “It’s a wider spectrum in age than we’ve ever programmed for in the past,” Niese said. Niese has advocated for that range of programming – and for a new senior center in Bowling Green to meet those needs. The center, which could open in 2020, will include more room for activities like bridge, shuffleboard, tai chi, yoga, painting and a writing club.  There will also be respite care for people with dementia, and a “memory café.” “Today’s…


BG Chamber seeks nominations for mid-year awards

From BOWLING GREEN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Nominations are currently being sought for the Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce’s Mid-Year Awards. The public is invited to submit nominations for these awards. Nomination forms, including criteria and submission information, are available from the Chamber of Commerce, Four Corners Center at 130 S. Main St., and can also be obtained from the Chamber’s website at www.bgchamber.net. Completed nomination forms should be returned to the Chamber of Commerce office by June 18th, 2018; no late submissions will be accepted. For questions contact the Chamber of Commerce office at 419-353-7945 or chamber@bgchamber.net. These awards will be presented at the Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce Mid-Year Meeting to be held on Friday, July 20th, 2018 at Olscamp Ballroom 101, at Bowling Green State University. I LOVE BG AWARD – The I Love BG Award was established in 1988 to recognize an individual or organization for their efforts in increasing the visibility and promotion of the City, and improving the quality of life for Bowling Green residents. OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE AWARD – The Outstanding Customer Service Award is to honor businesses that demonstrate exceptional customer service. To publicly promote, showcase and congratulate those businesses who are excelling in customer service. To maintain and strengthen Bowling Green businesses including for-profits and non-profits as outstanding providers of exceptional and quality customer service. The Business must be an Investor of the Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce at the time the award is presented. The Business must be in operation at least one year. Nominations are encouraged from satisfied customers who feel they have received exceptional service from a Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce Investor. Businesses can self-nominate. SMALL BUSINESS OF THE YEAR AWARD – The Small Business of the Year Award is to honor businesses located within the Bowling Green city limits that demonstrate achievement in management and workplace excellence, product innovation, and community and social responsibility. To acknowledge publicly the vital contributions made by area companies to business growth in Bowling Green. To illustrate the depth of talent that exists in the Bowling Green business Community by highlighting nominees’ success stories. The nominated business may be any for-profit business headquartered in the city limits of Bowling Green. Businesses must meet the definition of a Small Business as defined by the Small Business Administration. Businesses must be financially stable and operational for a minimum of five years. Businesses must be an Investor of the Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce at the time the award is presented. The Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce supports an environment…


‘Every Dog Matters’ rally critical of county dog warden

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   More than 50 people carrying signs and holding leashes marched Friday evening in Bowling Green to profess their love of dogs and protest euthanasia at the Wood County Dog Shelter. Dwight Stinehart, of Portage, brought his three-legged boxer, Shrek, to the “Every Dog Matters” rally in the Wooster Green. The dog shelter is too quick to euthanize, he said. “We just want to raise awareness,” Connie Donald, of the Wood County Canine Alliance, said as she held a sign saying “If you’re not angry, you’re not paying attention.” “Things have been done the same way there for 20 years,” Donald said of the county dog shelter operation. The primary objection of the Canine Alliance members is that dogs are mislabeled as being aggressive and are needlessly euthanized. “We don’t think every dog can be saved,” Donald said. But she does think the county can do better. Last year, 74 dogs were euthanized at the Wood County Dog Shelter. That’s too many, according to members of the Canine Alliance. But according to statistics from the dog shelter, the percentages of dogs euthanized at the shelter have been dropping over the last decade. More than 40 percent of the dogs brought into the shelter in 2009 were euthanized. When Andrew Snyder took over as chief dog warden in 2001, nearly a quarter of the dogs brought to the shelter were euthanized. The number has been gradually dropping, hitting a low of 9.3 percent so far this year, Snyder said. Efforts have increased to return the dogs to their owners (47 percent), adopt them out to new homes (25 percent) and transfer them to rescue groups (19 percent). But Donald questioned those numbers, suggesting that Snyder isn’t counting the dogs declared “unadoptable” in the euthanized tally. Consequently, the protest signs calling Snyder the “Death Warden,” and stating “Stop killing our dogs,” “Silence = Death” and “Commissioners listen to your voters.” Members of the Canine Alliance believe that the evaluations conducted on dogs at the shelter are not fair, and do not take into account the stress the dogs are under in the facility. The dogs deserve enrichment, outdoor time and attention. “They are not meeting the emotional needs,” Donald said. “You can’t just get a dog and expect it to be perfect.” Karen Ash said shelter workers need more empathy for the dogs. “We want to give all the dogs a chance,” she said. Ash also said the shelter records should be open to the public. The public deserves to…


Project Connect begins hooking up volunteers & donations

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Project Connect Wood County is more than a one-day event. Project Connect provides direct services to people who are homeless or in poverty, or in danger of becoming homeless or in poverty. The benefits accrue to the guests all year, and to the volunteers who make it happen. “It’s very gratifying. I see people in the store, and they ask if we’re doing this again,” said volunteer Marisa Hutchinson. She’s happy that she can answer yes. And she’ll be there to help out again. “Once you volunteer,” she said, “you start planning for the next year.” Planning for Project Connect gets started months in advance. About 30 people gathered for the kickoff meeting Thursday morning at St. Mark’s Church. The church will host Project Connect on Oct. 17 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Project Connect was started in 2013, launched by the Continuum of Care Wood County. It was spurred by concern about homelessness. But shelter insecurity has many dimensions. People also need food, sanitary products, mental health services, legal assistance, and haircuts. Rhonda Stoner, a social worker with the Wood County Community Health Center, said she was surprised to see the change in people after they’d gotten their hair cut. The guests reported just that made them feel so much better about themselves, she said. Last year project volunteers cut the hair of 118 guests. Those seeking help are not clients, they are guests, neighbors stopping over for a helping hand from other neighbors. “We approach everything from the aspect of hospitality,” said Erin Hachtel, one of the co-chairs for the event. Each guest first talks with someone to determine what they and their families “need to be healthy, safe and secure,” Hachtel said. Then they are assisted by a host who guides them through a maze of stations to help find just what they need most. What brings them in varies. Last year, the biggest need was help getting through the holidays, Hachtel noted. That was the first time this was mentioned. The survey of the top reason they came included seeking employment, desire for more education or training, stress management, legal assistance, mental health treatment, housing, and internet connectivity. By having hosts and guest navigate the event together, Hachtel said, “we’re saying we’re all in this together. Let’s walk together to find what will help you and your family.” In 2017, Project Connect helped 574 individuals from 278 households. More than 200 people volunteers and 52 providers and agencies set up shop. During the day…


Scruci asks city to join in solution for school district

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green Superintendent Francis Scruci invited city leaders Monday evening to get involved in school business. Scruci asked those attending City Council to put June 25 on their calendars. Since the school district’s bond issue has been rejected twice by voters, the board is taking a different approach. “Our board is committed to finding out what our community will support,” he said. So a community task force open meeting will be held June 25, at 6:30 p.m., in the school’s performing arts center. “It’s going to be turned over to the community,” Scruci said. City Council President Mike Aspacher thanked the superintendent for the invitation to join in the process. “We’ve all been supportive of your efforts in the past,” Aspacher said. Also at Monday’s meeting, Mayor Dick Edwards expressed regret that the “celebrity guest” expected to attend the meeting was unable to make it. But the mayor revealed his intentions to declare June 15 as Jerry Anderson Day in Bowling Green, in honor of the newscaster’s last day at WTOL-11. Anderson got his start in broadcasting 44 years ago at WFOB radio here in Bowling Green, Edwards said. Since then, he has helped many community groups with fundraising, either by acting as auctioneer or emcee. His generosity has been “totally amazing,” the mayor said. Edwards also mentioned all the positive national publicity Bowling Green is receiving since the general managers of both hockey teams in the Stanley Cup are Bowling Green State University hockey alums.  The men, both from the same town in Canada, both played under BGSU Coach Jerry York, and were roommates for three years. George McPhee is now with the Las Vegas Golden Knights, and the Brian MacLellan is with the Washington Capitals. Ryan Carpenter, a more recent BGSU hockey standout, is playing for the Golden Knights. And Mike “Doc” Emrick, who earned his doctorate at BGSU, has been mentioning the many BGSU connections during this play-by-play announcing. In other business, Public Works Director Brian Craft was asked to give an overview of the city’s new brush collection program. The pickups used to be every spring and fall, then were reduced to once in the fall. Now the brush pickups are upon request, with four options of April, May, September and October. In May, the city got 320 requests for pickups, Craft said. Though not always convenient, Craft said if people missed those months, the city will return in September and October. “We’ll come back around in the fall if you can hang…


Chamber seeking donations to support fireworks

From the BOWLING GREEN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE The Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce presents the annual Bowling Green fireworks. This is one of the great celebrations of the Bowling Green community. It is an intergenerational, family friendly and fun-filled event supported by many businesses and community members. The Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce has supported this celebration since 1935, and is proud to coordinate this event for 2018. On behalf of the BG Chamber of Commerce Fireworks Project Team and the community of Bowling Green, we are looking for donations of support for the annual community fireworks. The cost of the display is $18,500. Our goal is to continue to offer the quality show and celebration we have in the past and your donation would ensure this. Any amount is appreciated! The 2018 fireworks will take place on Tuesday, July 3 beginning at dusk, approximately 10 p.m., on the intramural fields at Bowling Green State University. Once again, the BG Area Community Band will provide a patriotic concert at the Mileti Alumni Center, at 8 p.m. A rain date for the fireworks only (no concert) is Thursday, July 5th. The Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce supports an environment for the development and success of business within the Bowling Green area. The BG Chamber of Commerce Celebrates, Educates, and Strengthens its Investors through business improvement events, grants, services, Leadership, Legislative Updates and group savings programs. We are your Community Connection via ‘The Morning Show’ radio program WBGU 88.1FM, Wood County Safety Council, annual Awards, Holiday Parade and Fireworks. The BG Chamber of Commerce is Celebrating 82 years, Est. 1936.


BG passes food truck ordinance – time to get cookin’

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Phil Barone has already scouted out a great place for his food truck. And after Bowling Green City Council’s action Monday evening, he may finally get to set up shop. City Council voted in favor of the new mobile food vendor ordinance and declared an emergency to get things cooking. “We’re getting into good weather and want to get things moving,” said council member Bill Herald, who led the food truck ordinance effort. The fees set by council Monday evening are $100 for an annual mobile food vendor permit, and $40 for a special event permit. The ordinance was welcomed by Barone, who has owned Rosie’s Italian Grille in Toledo for 36 years, and has a food truck that serves customers in Perrysburg, Maumee, Waterville and Toledo. Barone, of Perrysburg, arrived early for the council meeting, so he drove around town looking for a good spot for his truck. His eyes zeroed in on Wooster Green with the new gazebo. “I think we could get enough trucks there to make a difference,” he said. Barone heads up a food truck association which has 11 members. Their menus offer items like grilled baby lamb chops, lobster mac and cheese, cauliflower crust pizza, Cuban food, steamed mussel salad, perch, cappuccino, and ice cream. Now he just has to find a day of the week that works. “It’s usually best to do it once a week, so people get used to it.” Some communities couple their food truck evenings with other events. Perrysburg pairs its farmers market with food trucks. Waterville links art exhibits with food trucks. Barone is thinking Bowling Green’s hook may be music. “We have some fantastic food vendors, we just need to get them down here,” he said. Earlier this year, Barone wasn’t so sure Bowling Green would get its food truck ordinance done. But he was hopeful, since both he and his wife graduated from BGSU and love the community. “Bowling Green is not known for doing anything really fast,” he said. “Bowling Green deserves a good shot, so I’m going to do my best.” Al Alvord, a retired Bowling Green police officer who operates “Weenie Dawgs” hotdog cart, is also pleased that the city now has a food truck ordinance. “This has been a long time coming,” Alvord said. He first introduced his hot dog cart idea in 2003 and again in 2012. “There was less than a warm reception,” he said. Alvord praised the work of the committee that worked on the ordinance…


BG site selected for medical marijuana dispensary

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   A Bowling Green location has been selected by the state as a provisional medical marijuana dispensary. The former Glass City Credit Union Building, at 1155 N. Main St., will be able to provide medicinal marijuana under the name Glass City Alternatives. The State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy today awarded 56 medical marijuana provisional dispensary licenses. A total of 376 applications had been received. A provisional license is a temporary license issued to an applicant for a medical marijuana dispensary license, authorizing them to begin establishing a dispensary. All provisional license holders have six months to demonstrate compliance with the dispensary operational requirements to obtain a certificate of operation. Once a dispensary is awarded a certificate of operation, it can begin to sell medical marijuana to Ohio patients and caregivers in accordance with Ohio laws and rules. The state had been divided into four quadrants for medical marijuana sales – with Northwest Ohio to have 10 dispensaries. The region was broken into districts, with Wood, Hancock and Henry counties being combined into one district to be allowed one dispensary. No applicants filed for locations in Hancock or Henry counties. So that left Wood County to host a dispensary. The three applications filed with the State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy were for sites at: 106 E. Napoleon Road, Bowling Green, with the business name of Debbie’s Dispensary, filed by Sara Presler. 1155 N. Main St., Bowling Green, with the business name of Glass City Alternatives, filed by Mark Jacobs. 2701 Woodville Road, Northwood, with the business name of Serenity Dispensary, filed by Deitra Hickey. House Bill 523, the Ohio law that in 2016 legalized marijuana for medical use only, tasked the Ohio Board of Pharmacy with determining which locations should be approved as dispensaries. A total of potential 376 sites were submitted, though just 56 were approved, according to Grant Miller, spokesperson with the Ohio Board of Pharmacy. The law requires 500 feet between any marijuana business and a school, church, public library or public playground. “We have to make sure they are complying with the rule,” Miller said earlier this year. “It’s an in depth process. Obviously, there’s a lot that goes into the application.” All the applicants were required to show the sites had proper commercial zoning, and that the community had not enacted a moratorium on the sale of medical marijuana. “When it comes to dispensaries and the way they interact with areas, it’s really up to the local areas. In the end, it’s…