Bowling Green State University

BGSU to host all-day opioid teach-in, Sept. 25

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATION Bowling Green State University will host “Change the Story: Opioid Teach-In” on Sept. 25 to raise awareness about the opioid crisis, make connections to existing resources, research and data, and to apply BGSU expertise to help individuals gain practical skills to help the community. The event is open to community members interested in or affected by the opioid crisis. Sessions will be held from 9:15 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. in various rooms in the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. “Because of our knowledgeable faculty and staff, across disciplines, Bowling Green State University is uniquely positioned to examine the opioid crisis facing the region and the country,” said Dr. Melissa Burek, associate dean of the College of Health and Human Services. “We hope to increase awareness of this epidemic as well as explore solutions for positive change.” Topics of the teach-in include: National context of crisis Family experiences Neurology of addiction Recovery Treatment Urban, suburban and rural justice responses Prevention Policies and approaches to changing the story The opioid crisis affects nearly every community and the country at large. It is projected that opioid use may result in the deaths of more than 500,000 people over the next 10 years at the present trajectory. In Ohio, opioid overdoses and deaths are among the highest in the nation. By hosting the opioid teach-in, the University takes a leadership role in education and solutions for this epidemic. Attendees will have the opportunity to participate in any session of interest. Sessions will vary from informational videos, discussion panels, training seminars and story sessions to presentations by individuals who have experienced addiction as well as families affected by the opioid crisis. BGSU also has created “Change the Story: An Original Film,” offering important techniques to lead safe and informative discussions for positive change in the way the community views the opioid crisis. BGSU has brought together knowledgeable faculty and leading community members to share their expertise. Sessions will be led or facilitated by representatives from local health and safety organizations, including the Wood County Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services board, Wood County Sheriff’s Department, the Zepf Center, the National Alliance on Mental Illness and the Northwest Community Correctional Center. Burek added that, in addition, BGSU students have been a valuable part of the planning process. In keeping with BGSU’s role…


BGSU eyes Mercy College partnership as way to expand its nursing program

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University announced Wednesday an agreement with Mercy Health that will dramatically increase the number of nursing students it educates. BGSU and Mercy Health have signed a letter of intent to transfer operations of Mercy College of Ohio to the university. This marks just the first step of the transition that could take up to four years to finalize. First the trustees of BGSU, Mercy Health, and Mercy College need to approve the plan, then it will need to run a gauntlet of state, federal, professional and accrediting boards. That’s expected to take about a year. Then finalizing the arrangement will take  another two to three years. While many details are yet to be worked out, the goal is for BGSU to increase to 2,000 the number of nursing students. It now has about 350 who receive their clinical training through partnership with the University of Toledo. Earlier that summer the two institutions announced that partnership will end in 2022. Mercy College now has 1,300 students in Toledo and another 200 in an associate’s degree program in Youngstown. None of the students currently in either the BGSU or Mercy programs will not be affected by the change.  “This is an exciting day,” BGSU President Rodney Rogers said at a press conference announcing the partnership. “Clearly there is a tremendous need to insure we’re growing the number of nursing graduates.”  Bob Baxter, president and CEO of Mercy Health-Toledo Region said: “The demand for nurses and other allied health professionals far exceeds the supply in Ohio and the nation.”  By 2024 the country will need a million more nurses. That demand is driven by the aging of baby boomers, retirements in the health care field, and increasing demand by consumers for health care close to home. He said that the partnership builds on BGSU’s depth of academic programs and Mercy College’s 100 years of educating nurses.  The collaboration with Mercy Health will also offer BGSU faculty and students opportunities for research. Because of Mercy’s statewide network, clinical opportunities will be available around the state closer to here many BGSU students live. In entering into this plan, Baxter said, Mercy Health is responding to changing market conditions and the reduction in reimbursement for hospital-based nursing education programs. The transfer will…


BGSU sees enrollment gains from home & abroad

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News With undergraduate enrollment up 1.2 percent at Bowling Green State University, Cecilia Castellano, vice provost for strategic enrollment planning, has reason to smile. Ask her about the 16 new students from Vietnam and then she really beams.  Those students are part of one of the trends BGSU is bucking that helped it achieve an increase in enrollment.  The number of international students seeking higher education in the United States has been declining for several years. BGSU’s international enrollment is up 18 percent, mostly undergraduates. The top countries  sending students are China, Vietnam  and Saudi Arabia  with Vietnam being a new market. There could be more foreign students, said Dean of the Graduate College Margaret Booth. Visas are often taking months longer for students to obtain. What  once took one to two-months now can take up to six months in some countries. A number of those students have already told the university they plan to come in January, she said. “I am very pleased we have 16 freshmen from Vietnam,” Castellano said. She traveled to Vietnam in April to meet with the prospective students and their families. She feels that the community of Bowling Green as well the university helped bring the students here. It’s a place families feel comfortable sending their offspring.  The university issued its 15th day enrollment report Tuesday, and it showed total student enrollment is 19,540, up from 19,331 in 2017, about 1 percent. BGSU enrolled 6,700 new students “We’re very pleased with the continued growth in enrollment,” said President Rodney Rogers. Also, enrollment at BGSU’s Firelands campus increased by 1.4 percent to 1,997. “We’re reversing a trend we’ve seen over several years of a decline in two-year regional campuses,” Rogers said. That number includes more than 200 students taking part in the Pathways program through which students enrolled at Firelands study on the Bowling Green campus as a way of easing their transition to the four-year school. BGSU now has 14,861 undergraduates compared to 14,682 in fall 2017. The number of graduate students stayed about the same with 2,682. Booth said there’s more to that number, though. Last academic year the university awarded a 131 more graduate degrees than the previous year. So for the number to remain steady more new graduate students had to be…


Explorer-scientist to discuss the future of the world’s oceans at BGSU

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Dr. Sylvia Earle is known as a trailblazer for the world’s oceans. She also is a National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence who will come to Bowling Green State University for two days to explore the value of our waters with the public, students and faculty. As this year’s McMaster Visiting Scientist, she will present “The World Is Blue” at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18 in 202A Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Her presentation is free and open to the public. A reception will immediately follow her talk. Earle’s reputation as an ecologist and conservator of marine ecosystems aligns with BGSU’s expansive involvement in the research and work being done on water quality locally, nationally and internationally. The lecture this year is focused on the importance of taking care of our water systems. Based on her book “The World Is Blue,” Earle will discuss how our fate and the oceans’ are one. She will share stories that put the current and future peril of the ocean and the life it supports in perspective for a public audience. Earle is founder of the Sylvia Earle Alliance (S.E.A.) / Mission Blue and Deep Ocean Exploration and Research Inc. (DOER). She is chair of the Advisory Council for the Harte Research Institute and former chief scientist of NOAA. The author of more than 200 publications and leader of more than 100 expeditions with over 7,000 hours underwater, Earle is a graduate of Florida State University with M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Duke University and 27 honorary doctorates. Her research concerns the ecology and conservation of marine ecosystems and development of technology for access to the deep sea. She is the subject of the Emmy® Award-winning Netflix documentary “Mission Blue,” and the recipient of more than 100 national and international honors and awards, including being named Time magazine’s first Hero for the Planet, a Living Legend by the Library of Congress, 2014 UNEP Champion of the Earth, Glamour magazine’s 2014 Woman of the Year, a member of the Netherlands Order of the Golden Ark, and winner of the 2009 TED Prize, the Walter Cronkite Award, the 1996 Explorers Club Medal, the Royal Geographic Society 2011 Patron’s Medal, and the National Geographic 2013 Hubbard Medal. The McMaster Visiting Scientist program is underwritten by an endowment funded by Helen and the late Harold McMaster. The longtime BGSU benefactors, from Perrysburg established the interdisciplinary program to…


BGSU hires new top fundraiser

Bowling Green State University has hired a top fundraiser from Southern Methodist University as its new vice president for University Advancement and president of the BGSU Foundation. President Rodney Rogers announced the hiring of Pam Conlin to lead BGSU’s advancement and alumni efforts.  She will assume her new position on October 8. In making the announcement, Rogers wrote: “Now more than ever, universities need strong philanthropic support to achieve their vision. As a public university focused on creating public good, we must increase our support for scholarships, professorships, facilities and programs. We are confident that, with her expertise, Ms. Conlin will be a strong leader for these efforts. Her immediate priority will be strengthening our engagement and outreach to successfully complete our Changing Lives for the World campaign.” Conlin has worked at Southern Methodist since 1999 in positions of increasing responsibility. Most recently, as assistant vice president for principal and major gifts, she worked to develop and implement an aggressive plan for growth. Prior to that, as assistant vice president for university development, she played a key role in that university’ capital campaign that concluded in 2015, well exceeding its $1 billion goal. Conlin received her undergraduate degree from Miami University. She and her husband have family in Michigan. Shea McGrew left the job in March  with the Changing Lives for the World campaign halfway to its $200 million goal. Dr. Bill Balzer has been serving in that role as an interim.


Preliminary enrollment numbers adding up for BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University Faculty Senate opened the new academic year hearing some positive, if preliminary, numbers about enrollment. Cecilia Castellano, vice president for strategic enrollment planning, reported in response to a question from President Rodney Rogers that as of today the university has 6,648 new students.  That includes traditional first year students, transfer students, more than 200 in the Firelands Pathways program, high school students taking College Credit Plus courses, and students taking courses through BGSU eCampus. “We have every reason to be pleased,” Rogers said. Interim Provost John Fischer reported the numbers in more details but still in broad strokes, because they can still “wobble,” he said. Students are still enrolling in College Credit Plus and eCampus and some students are deciding to leave BGSU. The official enrollment numbers will be announced on Monday the 15th day of the semester. Still administrators couldn’t hold back the good news. For the fifth year in a row, Fischer said, this is “the most academically prepared entering class we’ve had.” That includes an increase number of top scholars who have an ACT score of 27 or higher and a GPA above 3.7. Programs such as Forensic Science and Politics, Philosophy, Economics and Law are “resonating with students who are looking for rigorous academic programs.” This is the most diverse class, Fischer said, with 23 percent being students of color. He added: “We can’t just recruit students in, we have to create the environment that supports and welcomes them and helps them meet their academic and career goals while they’re here.” Later, in response to a question, Castellano said that the number of international students, both undergraduate and graduate, has increased about 10 percent. That bucks a national trend. She cited China, Vietnam, and Saudi Arabia as the countries leading the way. She also said that more international graduate students are opting to stay to complete their degrees. Fischer said that the College of Technology. Architecture and Applied Engineering has seen a 35-percent growth in overall student population. That reflects an interest in the eCampus and in the growth of aviation and mechatronics. The College of Musical Arts, BGSU’s smallest college, is also seeing double digit growth. Fischer also said BGSU expects to see an increase in the retention rate. That…


BGSU hosting dialogue on race

From the BGSU OFFICE OF RESIDENCE LIFE Bowling Green State University is hosting  Rev. Dr. Jamie Washington, current President of the American College Student Personnel Association (ACPA), for an honest dialogue across race. The session will be held Wednesday, September 5, 1:00pm 2:30 p.m. in room 201 of the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. It is designed to help participants move into deep, authentic conversation. Topics of Discussion include: Acknowledging the impact and power of coded language Understanding of microaggressions and how they impact their targets Interrupting (effectively) offensive language Managing triggers as we converse across difference A session geared toward faculty and staff will be held Thursday, 10:30 a..m to noon, also in BTSU 201. Topics of Discussion include: Understanding microaggressions and the impact of coded language Balancing both legal and ethical First Amendment concerns Beginning to create a system of support for targeted minoritized students Rev. Dr. Jamie Washington is the president and founder of the Washington Consulting Group (WCG). In October of 2015, WCG was named by the Economist as one of the Top 10 Global Diversity Consultants in the world. He is the President and Co-Founder of the Social Justice Training Institute and the President of ACPA, American College Educators International. Dr. Washington has served as an educator, administrator, and consultant in higher education for over 34 years. Dr. Washington is invested in working with colleges and universities to build capacity for greater inclusion in support of student learning and development. He works with campus leaders, staff, faculty and students to create a culture that values, respects and includes all of its members, while helping campuses to address the historical and residual impacts of exclusion. Leadership, Change Management and Social Justice Issues are at the core of his work. He has received many awards and honors. Most recently he was honored with the University of Maryland Baltimore County’s Legends of Excellence Award for his contribution to the lives and education of Black and LatinX faculty, staff and students. He is a member of Omicron Delta Kappa, Golden Key, Alpha Phi Omega, Phi Delta Kappa and a life member of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity Inc. Dr. Washington earned his B.S. degree from Slippery Rock State College; a double Masters’ of Science degrees from Indiana University/Bloomington; a Ph.D. is in College Student Development, from the University of Maryland College Park; and…


Money Magazine praises BGSU for affordability

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University has once again been recognized for its commitment to quality and affordability. Money Magazine recently placed BGSU on its list of “Best Colleges for Your Money,” based on 26 measures of educational quality, affordability and alumni success. “As public University, our mission is to create public good. We do that by preparing our graduates to live meaningful and productive lives,” said BGSU President Rodney Rogers. “This ranking is evidence of our commitment to affordability, the high-value of our degrees and our responsibility to provide an education that is the foundation of success for our alumni and their families.” According to the magazine’s methodology, these rankings combine pricing estimates with indicators of alumni financial success. In a similar ranking, The Economist magazine named BGSU first among public universities in Ohio for boosting former students’ earnings 10 years after college and 97 percent of BGSU graduates report that they’re employed, in graduate school or starting a business within six months of graduation. BGSU has more than 180,000 living alumni residing in all 50 states and around the world. Business Insider has also ranked BGSU Ohio’s No. 1 university for quality and affordability. The University’s commitment to affordability is evidenced by its Falcon Tuition Guarantee, which ensures that students know from the start how much their education will cost.


BGSU opens its arms to new class of Falcons

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The class of 2022 has some exciting days ahead of them. On Thursday, many young people arrived with parents in tow with all the accoutrements of dorm life to settle in as Bowling Green State University students. The university is expecting a class of just over 3,600 first year students. The Falcon spirit hovered in the air. Frieda Falcon milled around just before noon to greet students and their helpers as they lined up to make their ways into their new homes. Just above the chatter one could hear the strains of the Falcon Marching Band practicing a quarter mile away. And President Rodney Rogers, still in his first year in his position, was also on hand to greet students, chatting with them about their hopes and prospects. Move in is staggered Thursday through Sunday, with some students arriving as early as Tuesday. The class of 2022 is the most academically prepared class ever. It is the sixth year the university has achieved that, according to the press release from the Office of Marketing and Communications. “(T)his class is trending to have the highest grade-point average in University history at 3.46,” the release said. “In addition, the number of top scholars (those with an ACT score of 27 or higher and a GPA above 3.7) in this freshman class is up by 5 percent over last year. “Students from the class represent 31 states, 79 Ohio counties and nearly 900 high schools. Twenty-three percent of the incoming freshmen are first-generation college students.” Rogers said that the class was also the most diverse class ever, “which we’re also really proud of.” “It’s important to have students well prepared to be successful but also to have them from all kinds of background to live and learn together.” Rogers also noted that after a couple down years, the number of international students has gone up. That bucks a national trend among universities that have seen a decline in enrollment by foreign students. Foreign and domestic students are being drawn by a host of recent additions to the curriculum, software engineering, data analytics, and forensic science. Those kind of applied STEM disciplines tend to be what international students are interested in, Rogers said. Inclusive early childhood education also continues to be a draw….


Roundabout work at I-75 & East Wooster gets underway

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS A major project is set to begin that will convert the intersection of I-75 and East Wooster Street/State Route 64 to a single-lane roundabout, the Ohio Department of Transportation has announced. By the time the work is completed in July 2019, there will also be a new path across the highway for walkers and bikers, a new bridge deck and aesthetic features to beautify the area. Through Sept. 3, there will be two lanes westbound and one eastbound on Wooster between Alumni Drive and Dunbridge Road, and some overnight lane restrictions on I-75 between Poe Road and Napoleon Road. On Sept. 4, a 14-day closure of the southbound ramp from I-75 to Wooster will begin. East Wooster will go down to one lane in each direction and overnight lane restrictions on the highway will be in force. Closure of the northbound I-75 ramp to and from Wooster Street will take place in the spring. During the project, pedestrian access will be maintained but there may be sidewalk restrictions on East Wooster. View a timeline and details at the project website.


The university & students add value to their communities, Gardner tells BGSU grads

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The sun shined down on Bowling Green State University graduates Saturday morning. For the first time since 2013, summer commencement ceremonies were held outdoors on university lawn. Since that time construction projects in the area had forced summer commencement into the Stroh Center. Now with the work on University and Moseley halls and the Kuhlin Center completed, graduation was moved back outdoors. “It’s beautiful,” said graduate Abby Paskvan, of Bowling Green. “I’ve taken so many pictures.” Others approved as well, though Diamond Hurt was concerned about temperatures expected to rise to 90. Dressed in her cap and gown she was already feeling the heat. In his remarks, graduation speaker State Sen. Randy Gardner (R-Bowing Green) praised university officials for “preserving these traditional buildings.” “They have not only protected our heritage and our history but inside they have modernized learning centers for our students.” BGSU President Rodney Rogers said the unprecedented renovation and building boom that the graduates had experienced during their time on campus was not over. Nearby the new College of Business is just starting to take shape with the expansion and renovation of Hanna Hall, and after that will come the renovation of the College of Technology. The graduation class had 942 degree recipients, including 364 receiving graduate degrees. During their time on campus, Rogers said, more than 1.5 million volumes, paper and digital, have been borrowed from Jerome Library. In that time, students have eaten as well 1.6 million meals at the Oaks Dining Center alone. Students have spent 2 million hours at the Rec Center. By making the commitment and graduating, they are adding value to the university, he said. “Make sure you have fun,” Rogers urged them. “And never stop learning.” The Economist magazine said that BGSU was the top college in the state for return on education, the equivalent of return on investment for a business, a fact noted by both Gardner and Rogers. “Not only will your BGSU degree be of value to you, but this university is becoming more than a value to others,” Gardner said. The majority leader in the state senate praised BGSU’s efforts to reach beyond campus to help the community. That includes its partnership with the county Committee on Aging to build a new senior citizens center…


BGSU recognized for work on community, economic initiatives

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University has been designated an Innovation and Economic Prosperity (IEP) University by the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities (APLU) and its Commission on Innovation, Competitiveness, and Economic Prosperity. BGSU is one of just 60 institutions in North America to receive this internationally recognized distinction, demonstrating the University’s commitment to economic and community engagement. Universities are awarded based on the quality of their connections with public and private sector partners in their region. To be considered for the designation, the APLU requires applying universities to complete a rigorous self-study and regional-engagement report. Within the self-study, BGSU highlighted such achievements as its Center for Regional Development generating $5 million for community enhancement, the NWO COSMOS project raising $22 million for STEM teacher training within the region, and participation in “Not in Our Town” a partnership with the city of Bowling Green to act against hate and discrimination within the community, which received a national ImpACT Award from the International Town and Gown Association in 2016. “We are honored to receive this distinction from APLU,” said BGSU President Rodney Rogers. “As a public university, BGSU understands its responsibility to create public good through teaching, research and community engagement. It’s our mission and our passion.” According to Rogers, it’s notable that BGSU is the only public University to receive the recognition that doesn’t have an engineering or medical school – two significant economic drivers. “This really speaks to how we engage with our community,” he said. “Our work extends beyond science and technology which, while important, do not fully address the human needs of society. We are working to support and develop communities as a whole – economically, organizationally, culturally and socially. Together, we’re strengthening the communities where we live and work, our region and our state.” Development projects at the University include: “Vital Communities Initiative,” which pairs BGSU students and faculty members with Ohio communities – Sandusky and Bowling Green are current partners – to identify and address projects that engage students in high impact learning, impact citizens of our region, and catalyze community and university resources for sustainable, livable and vibrant communities. Development of an “Early Warning Model” to identify communities at risk of economic distress.; A campaign to establish the first Center for Oceans and Human Health in the Great Lakes region, which will address harmful algal blooms and…


Summit shines light on campus & community partnerships

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News University and local officials used the Ohio Town and Gown Summit on the Bowling Green State University campus last week to shine a light on their efforts to ink the campus and surrounding community. Thursday’s after-lunch keynote address offered a one-two punch of Mayor Richard Edwards and Bowling Green State University President Rodney Rogers. Both also tipped their hats to someone who could not be there, President Emeritus Mary Ellen Mazey. Though scheduled to return to campus for the summit, Mazey was not able to attend because of illness, Edwards said. Edwards knows about the relationship between communities and universities, having forged a career in both settings, including as a vice president at BGSU and Wood County Administrator, before assuming his current duties. He credited Mazey with being a driving force behind the increased cooperation between the city and campus. Not long after they’d met she told him: “Dick, let’s do a joint vision study.” That rang a “’yes’ bell in my head,” Edwards said. Kent, the home of Kent State University, serves as a model for what BG and BGSU hope to achieve. It now has a major thoroughfare effectively linking the two entities. That did not come easily. Edwards recalled fierce local opposition to an earlier attempt to do that. He quipped that he’d forgotten to ask his fellow mayors in attendance what brand of flak jacket they wore. Bowling Green’s version is a new vision for the East Wooster corridor stretching west from I-75 interchange into downtown. The project on the east end is ready to begin the construction phase. Rogers said that public universities have a special responsibility to serve the public good. That includes giving students the means to be socially mobile. That responsibility extends to doing “relevant and meaningful research” on issues of societal concern, he said. Those include the opioid crisis and water quality. Beyond that university must find ways to link that research to inform public debate on those issues. The university must also find public-private partnerships that help make sure “the cost of education does not get out of reach,” Rogers said. Private enterprises can provide some services more efficiently, and that “has allowed us to make savings that we were able to reinvest in programs.” A panel that immediately…


BGSU makes list as top university for international students

BY BOWLING GREEN STATE UNIVERSITY U.S. News & World Report recently released an inaugural list of the Top Universities for International Students. Bowling Green State University ranked in the top 75 of public universities offering resources to help international students adapt to and graduate from U.S.-based schools. “As international students consider their U.S. university options, it is vital that they understand whether schools will offer them financial aid, English labs, housing and dining services during holidays, and other services,” said Anita Narayan, managing editor of Education at U.S. News. “This list is a natural extension of our mission with the Best Colleges rankings, which have helped students and their families make decisions about their education for more than 30 years.” The Top Universities for International Students range from private institutions, such as Columbia University in New York, American University in Washington, D.C., and California Institute of Technology, to public schools, including the University of Virginia, Mississippi State University and East Carolina University. “We have always strived to make our campuses welcoming to international students, and these rankings confirm that our efforts to help them assimilate to the U.S. and northwest Ohio are working,” BGSU President Rodney Rogers said. “Our faculty and staff are world class, and are committed to helping our students succeed here and in life.” Through the dedicated team of the International Programs and Partnerships (IPP) office, BGSU offers its “global falcons” immigration support services, different programs to acclimate international students to American culture, opportunities to engage with the campus community, and the advising they need to succeed, said Dr. Marcia Salazar-Valentine, IPP executive director. “Our team advocates for international students throughout their career at the University and welcomes them each and every day at our office at 301 University Hall,” she said. To compile the list, U.S. News began with the National Universities in its annual Best Colleges rankings and then evaluated those that best support the needs of international students. Nineteen initial indicators were combined, in some cases, to create the six final indicators used in the analysis. These include graduation and retention rates for international students, availability of English as a Second Language programs and grant aid to international students. U.S. News developed the methodology with input from U.S. News Global Education, a company dedicated to connecting international students with the top universities in the United…


Bruce Meyer to lead BGSU capital planning & campus operations

Bruce Meyer has been named Bowling Green State University’s associate vice president for capital planning and campus operations, a role he has filled as interim since 2017. In announcing the appointment, President Rodney Rogers praised Meyer for making sure “our capital projects have been kept steadily moving forward.” Rogers added: “He is a longtime member of the executive team charged with implementing the Campus Master Plan and brings to the position thorough knowledge of the University and strong management skills.” In his new position, Meyer will be a member of the president’s cabinet. He will report to Sheri Stoll, vice president for finance and administration and chief financial officer.