Bowling Green State University

BGSU student Kyle Jumper-Smith organizes Project Feed Thy Neighbor in Detroit

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING  COMMUNICATIONS Hailed as an economic boon for a struggling city, the rapidly progressing revitalization and gentrification of Detroit neighborhoods has had the unintended consequence of leaving many longtime residents feeling left behind and without ready access to food stores and other essential businesses. But Bowling Green State University  junior Kyle Jumper-Smith has not forgotten about his hometown. Inspired by those who have given generously to him, this summer he organized the second Project Feed Thy Neighbor for his neighborhood, the Cass Corridor. It was a day of empowerment providing food, fellowship and positivity. This year’s event fed 422 people through the help of many donors and 76 volunteers who manned grills, served food, greeted attendees and managed the lines. “It wasn’t just about giving out food but also about uplifting people,” said Jumper-Smith, an inclusive early childhood educationmajor and former Student Leadership Assistant (SLA) in the Center for Leadership . “We challenged our volunteers to reach out to talk with people about what was going on and give each person a positive message of empowerment and a hug. We wanted to create a loving space. “This was a great experience to see the BGSU community collaborate with other students from other institutions and promote positivity and love in a community that is being abandoned due to new business ventures,” he said. “We also had people from Michigan State University, Kentucky State University, Grand Valley State University, Morehouse College and my alma mater, Lewis Cass Technical High School.” He dedicated the event to his late grandmother. “She would have wanted me to do something like this,” he said. “I’m…


Renovated BGSU Traditions buildings get positive reviews

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Tom Gorman came into University Hall looking for his old window. The long-time Bowling Green State University employee and graduate had worked in University Hall a number of years ago, and he visited the now renovated space checking out where he used to sit in a tiny cubicle. The room on the first floor of the 102-year-old building is no longer cramped.  Now home to the Center for Community and Civic Engagement, it is open and full of light. This is the one, or maybe this one is the window, Gorman said, before wandering off to check out the rest of the renovated building and its neighbor Moseley Hall, where he had taken classes. Gorman was one of the employees and community members who strolled through the buildings Thursday during an open house. The public will have another chance to visit the two buildings Saturday (Aug. 12) from noon to 2 p.m. Tours begin at noon and 1 p.m. For her part V. Jane Rosser, the director of the Center for Community and Civic Engagement, said she liked having people like Gorman, “folks who know the building, who worked here, students, people who cleaned and folks from other units” drop by to look at the space. “They’ve been very impressed.” Rosser is impressed as well with the office’s new space. In the 10 or so years the center has been in existence, she said, it has bounced from building to building wherever there was empty office space. “All out of the way,” she said. Now the center is located in a place that’s easy…


Business Insider calls BGSU most affordable college in Ohio

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Affordable and highly ranked. Those were the keys to being placed on Business Insider’s recently published list of the most affordable of the top colleges in every state. Bowling Green State University takes the Ohio spot. “Our faculty members’ teaching skills, research, expertise and involvement in our students’ education are hallmarks of the BGSU experience,” said BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey. “By leveraging their passion, we are able to provide a high-quality education at an affordable cost. We are pleased to once again be recognized for our commitment to affordability and accessibility.” Business Insider used tuition data from the Chronicle of Higher Education to compile the list, which only included colleges and universities rated in the top 220 by U.S. News and World Report. BGSU beat out the other five state universities on the list: Kent State University, Miami University, Ohio University, Ohio State University and the University of Cincinnati. The tuition data are from the 2016-17 academic year and include tuition, fees, and room and board. Earlier this year, Money Magazine placed BGSU on its list of “Best Colleges for Your Money.”


BGSU set to graduate diverse class on Aug. 5

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS A diverse group of 958 people will share a common experience on Saturday morning, Aug. 5. They will receive diplomas from Bowling Green State University. The 9 a.m. ceremony in the Stroh Center will see graduates as young as 18, as old as 71, and 114 who come from 29 other countries. More than half of the total are women. President Mary Ellen Mazey will preside over the ceremony, the 289th in University history. Megan Newlove, chair of the BGSU Board of Trustees, will present diplomas to the degree candidates, of whom 47 have earned associate degrees, including the 18-year-old; 476 bachelor’s degrees, including the 71-year-old; 360 master’s degrees and another 36 doctoral degrees. Eighty will wear the gold cord signifying they are graduating with academic honors based on their high grade-point averages. Students will graduate from all of the BGSU colleges: Arts and Sciences, Business, Education and Human Development, Firelands, Graduate, Health and Human Services, Honors, Musical Arts and Technology, Architecture and Applied Engineering. Addressing the graduates will be Brady Young of Roswell, Georgia, who graduated from BGSU with a degree in business in 1982. Young is principal owner of Strategic Risk Solutions (SRS) and serves as the firm’s president and CEO. SRS sets up and manages insurance companies for various business and institutions. It is the largest independent captive management firm in the world. Young has been with SRS since its inception in 1993 and led the management buyout of the company to establish it as an independent entity in 2002. He has more than 30 years of experience working with…


Africa’s future is here and now

By PATRICK MAKOKORO Mandela Washington Fellow 2017 Bowling Green State University The United Nations estimates that Africa is home to some 200 million people aged 15-24 years old and they predict that this figure will double by the year 2045. Participation by the youth in matters that affect them politically, socially and economically is vital because it has a direct bearing on how they live their lives. Africa’s young and emerging leadership is made of people who have a vision of the continent’s future that is expressed through focused passion and skills. Bowling Green State University (BGSU) is playing a role in this by hosting 25 Young African Leaders for a six week intensive leadership development institute. The Young African Leaders Institute (YALI) is jointly sponsored by the Mandela Washington Fellowship (https://yali.state.gov/washington-fellowship/) and BGSU. The YALI are from 19 African countries: Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Mauritania, Mauritius, Namibia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. As one of the young leaders from Zimbabwe attending the 2017 Institute at BGSU, I am very excited to be amongst my colleagues from countries as far North as Mauritania and as far South as South Africa. The various YALI fellows at BGSU have such depth of knowledge on the immediate challenges of African development that when I see their passion and zeal when discussing their countries’ burning issues, I get really excited. My colleagues have inspired me to look at the world through different lenses particularly when addressing issues like poverty, corruption, hunger and disease. A colleague from Guinea-Conakry, Boubacar Diallo,…


Young African leaders to discuss their aspirations in BGSU Ignite Talk, July 10

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Twenty-five young African leaders will share the work they are doing or plan to do in their home countries or share their thoughts on an issue of importance to them at Ignite Talks July 10, at 7 p.m. in the Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre in Bowling Green State University’s Wolfe Center for the Arts.  The leaders are participating in the 2017 Mandela Washington Fellowship program, which engages young African leaders from the Sub-Saharan region who have established records of accomplishment in promoting innovation and positive change in their organizations and communities. The Ignite Talks are designed to provide a platform for fellows to share the work they are doing or plan to do. The five-minute presentations focus on the overarching themes for this year’s Ignite Talks: empowerment, innovation and servant leadership. The cohort is currently staying at Bowling Green State University, which was selected as an institute partner for the program. The six-week program focuses on civic leadership and engagement and includes activities related to the issue areas of water quality, migration, refugee issues and human trafficking, youth poverty, and women’s, minority and disability rights. The Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders is a U.S. government program funded by the U.S. Department of State and supported in its implementation by IREX. For more information about the Mandela Washington Fellowship, visit yali.state.gov. WHAT: Ignite Talks WHEN: 7-9 p.m. Monday, July 10; doors open at 6:30


New state budget expected to eliminate BGSU undergrad tuition increase

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News With the conference committee wrapping up work on the Ohio budget, it appears that undergraduate tuition will not increase at Bowling Green State University in the fall. At its June meeting the BGSU Board of Trustees voted to raise tuition by 2 percent for undergraduate in-state tuition and general fees. The 2.5-percent increase for graduate students will still take effect. That vote was taken pending the resolution of a new state budget. Now with the budget just about ready for Gov. John Kasich’s signature, BGSU president Mary Ellen Mazey said the tuition increase will not be allowed at least for this year. The tuition hike would have generated $2.4 million in additional revenue. Nor will the university receive more state aid. “You never know what will happen, that’s certainly what it looks like coming out of the conference committee.” This is a case where the House version prevailed despite, she said, the efforts of State Sen. Randy Gardner (R-Bowing Green) who “worked very diligently” to try to get more favorable funding for universities. Mazey said that tuition increases would be allowed next year, but only if a university adopts the Ohio Guarantee program. Through that program schools promise that students’ tuition will remain the same throughout their four years. If BGSU adopts the tuition guarantee it would be allowed to raise tuition as much as 8 percent for incoming students in fall, 2018. However, Mazey said, that could be reduced to 6 percent by the governor. Mazey said while the budget is not good news, it could have been worse. Other agencies are taking…


BGSU & contractors take green approach to demolition

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University constructs buildings with a sense of environmental awareness. The university requires all new structures meet LEED Silver standards, and some including the Stroh Center, and Greek Village exceed that standard, said Ryan Miller, senior project manager in the Office of Design. He’s hoping with a few changes, the Kuhlin Center will also gain the gold designation. When buildings come down, the university and its contractors also try to be environmentally aware. Right now Miller, who worked on the Student Recreation Center renovation and the Wolff Center among other projects, is overseeing the demolition of West Hall and the Family and Consumer Science Building. By the time students arrive on campus next August there will be empty space where the two buildings stood. Miller said that the university’s design consultants and contractors are attuned to LEED principles. The demolition isn’t a LEED project, but as in those projects, the contractors are aiming to recycle and reuse as much material as possible. The original plan was to take brick and concrete from the buildings, crush it onsite, then use it as engineered fill in the basements of the razed structures. Instead in order to save time, the contractors will truck it to the landfill for construction waste and trade it for engineered fill that’s already stockpiled there. That fill will have to meet engineering approval, Miller said. The brick and concrete from BGSU will then be crushed to be used as engineered fill on other projects. The holes will be filled up to five feet from flush to the ground. Then soil…


New BGSU hires strengthen key academic programs

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Three tenure actions at the June meeting of the Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees meeting highlighted the university’s efforts to strengthen particular academic areas. The trustees approved granting tenure to three incoming faculty members, each in a key discipline, who have been hired by the administration. Provost Rodney Rogers described them as “strategic hires” aimed at bolstering academic areas where the university already is strong. MD Sarder was hired as a professor and chair of the Department of Engineering Technologies. He has been on the faculty at the University of Southern Mississippi. Rogers said he brings particular expertise in robotics and advanced manufacturing to BGSU. Jayaraman Sivaguru has been hired as a professor in the Department of Chemistry. He comes from North Dakota State University. Rogers said he brings expertise in STEM education and photochemical science. Timothy Davis has been hired as associate professor in the Department of Biological Sciences. He has been at the NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory in Ann Arbor. This will be his first full-time teaching position. Davis fits well into BGSU’s leading role in studying water quality in the Great Lakes, Rogers said. In other action, the trustees approved the naming of the computer lab in the Kuhlin Center for BGSU alumnus Judge Allan Davis. Shea McGrew, the vice president for University Advancement and the CEO of the BGSU Foundation, said that the judge has a long history of generosity towards his alma mater. Judge Davis told the trustees that South Hall, as the Kuhlin Center was known before its renovation and expansion, holds a special…


BGSU budget calls for tuition increase

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Faced with uncertainty over the final state budget, the Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees approved a $416.2 million budget Thursday morning That includes a 2-percent increase for in-state undergraduate tuition and general fees and 2.5-percent increase for in-state graduate tuition and general fees. The out-of-state surcharge for both graduate and undergraduate students will remain the same. This is the first time since 2013 that the university has raised tuition. The increase represents a hike of $105 per semester starting this fall. That brings tuition and general fees to $5,400, up from $5,295. The tuition increase is expected to bring in an additional $2,433,414 and the graduate tuition increase is $430,135. The trustees acted while budget negotiations continue in Columbus. Legislators are trying to reconcile spending plans passed by the House and Senate. The legislation must be signed by Gov. John Kasich by June 30. “The number of unknowns in this budget cycle exceeded the knowns,” Sheri Stoll, vice president for finance and administration, said. Based on the current proposals, BGSU officials are planning on no increase in state support for two years. But the budget would allow colleges and universities to raise tuition by $10 per credit hour. On the spending side, the budget includes a 4.1-percent increase in the amount allocated for salaries for faculty. That money is placed in a pool and allotted based on a number of factors. The pool for administrators and staff not in the bargaining unit will be 2 percent. The BGSU increase will amount to $8.75 per credit hours. The state proposal also allows colleges…


BGSU adds academies to its summer offerings

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Patrick Nelson and Bowling Green State University’s Conference and Events Services staff didn’t get the usual break after graduation this year. No sooner had the caps and gowns been packed away, then the university hosted three major events – Fire School, Alumni College, and the New Music Gathering. As Memorial Day approached, they did get something of a respite, but not for long – the BGSU campus will be a busy place this summer. Nelson, who serves both as director if the Bowen Thompson Student Union and Conference and Events Services, said despite the loss of Buckeye Boys State, he expects the university will host as many visitors this year as last. Nelson estimates campus will welcome about 5,000 guests. That, he noted, does not include those who come for weddings. This summer eight weddings are scheduled for campus, twice as many as last year. This year the university is launching a Summer Academy program. These academies will bring high school age students to campus to experience some of the new programs the university offers. Two will be offered in June – Forensic Science and Health Career Exploration – with two robotics camps – BGSU Robotics and Art and Robotics, a collaboration with the Toledo Museum of Art – offered in July. (See http://bgindependentmedia.org/bgsu-offers-range-of-summer-camps-in-science-the-arts/) Assistant Vice Provost Andy Alt said: “These are exciting new programs we want to introduce to potential students locally and across the state.” “The university has facilities and great faculty and experts around in the summer,” he said. This allows the university to extend its offerings beyond the usual degree-oriented…


BGSU offers free training on how to comply with government regulations

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University will host a free training to address various aspects of compliance during the fifth annual Compliance Day on June 1. Community members and business professionals have the opportunity to receive training directly from representatives of government agencies. Sessions will be led by representatives from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC); Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services, Veterans Programs; Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs; the U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division; Ability Center and the Ohio Civil Rights Commission (OCRC). The open sessions will cover a variety of topics regarding new regulations, the Civil Rights Act of 1964; EEOC’s strategic enforcement plan for fiscal years 2017-2021; disability awareness and resources; the Fair Labor Standards Act; powers and duties of the OCRC as it relates to employment; types of unlawful discrimination (Ohio Revised Code 4112; advantages of hiring a veteran; overview of the military skills translator and new 503/VEVRAA regulations, and lessons learned since the regulations have been in effect. “Compliance Day is designed to provide additional knowledge from the subject matter experts, who serve as regulators in their respective fields,” said Lisa Dubose, BGSU director of employee relations, professional development and EEO compliance. “It is imperative that organizational leaders continually update their understanding of existing or new laws and regulations pertinent to the workplace. We are pleased to offer this prestigious, no-cost training at Bowling Green State University.” The training is recommended for federal contract holders; EEO compliance professionals; hiring directors; managers and supervisors; and professionals in the fields of ability/disability services, veterans services, law, human resources,…


BGSU receives federal money to study migration

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The movement of people from place to place is centuries old. As part of human history, migration is integral to the story of the human race and modern society. Bowling Green State University has been awarded major funding under a new grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. “Understanding Migration: Local and Global Perspectives,” co-authored by Dr. Christina Guenther, world languages and cultures, and Dr. Vibha Bhalla, ethnic studies, has been funded for the full amount of $100,000. The new Humanities Connections grant is designed to encourage undergraduate students across the country to develop the intellectual skills and habits of mind that the humanities cultivate. In this first round of grant awards, BGSU was the only recipient in Ohio. The grant provides for professional development for faculty members in summer 2017 to design four new one-credit “1910” freshman seminar classes offered in the fall: “Immigrant Ohio in the 21st Century,” “Changing Faces of Europe: Contemporary Voices of Migration,” “The Great Migration,” and “Searching for Memories: Mexican (Im)Migration to Northwest Ohio.” The four seminars will then be expanded into general education courses and may qualify students for a Migration Studies certificate for those who complete all four. A second set of courses will be developed and launched in fall 2018. Topics may include “Transnational Ohio,” “Negotiating the Mediterranean: France and North Africa” and “Contemporary African Migration to the US.” Also supported by the grant will be BGSU’s third annual “Immigrant Ohio” symposium in fall 2017, and a community film festival on the topic of migration. BGSU faculty have been studying migration for years,…


Faculty celebrate milestones as BGSU trustees act on promotion & tenure (updated)

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The University celebrated milestones in faculty academic careers with the granting of promotion and, for some, tenure, approved by the Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees at its May 5 meeting. Promotion to Full Professor Timothy Brackenbury, communication sciences and disorders; Ellen Broido, higher education and student affairs; Larissa Szporluk Celli, English; Lynne Hewitt, communication sciences and disorders; Bob Lee, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies; Mingsheng Li, finance; John Liederbach, human services; Shannon Orr, political science; Andrew Pelletier, music performance studies; Valeria Grinberg Pla, romance and classical studies; Maria Rizzo, mathematics and statistics; Charles Saenz, music performance studies; Ray Schneider, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies; and Junfeng Shang, mathematics and statistics Tenure and Promotion to Associate Professor Leonel Carrillo, humanities, BGSU Firelands; Hyungsuk Choo, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies; Gregory Decker, musicology, composition and theory; Christopher Dietz, musicology, composition and theory; Stefan Fritsch, political science; Benjamin Greene, history; Adam Fullenkamp, School of Human Movement, Sport and Leisure Studies; David Hampton, School Intervention Services; Lisa Hanasono, School of Media and Communication; Daniel Kelley, natural and social sciences, Firelands; Starr Keyes, School Intervention Services; Hee Soon Lee, human services; Mary-Jon Ludy, public and allied health; Vera Lux, library teaching and learning; Kate Magsamen-Conrad, School of Media and Communication; Mariana Mereoiu, School Intervention Services; Marco Nardone, physics and astronomy; Susan Nelson, music performance studies; Sarah Rainey, School of Cultural and Critical Studies; William Sawaya, management; Robert Snyder, library teaching and learning; Mihai Staic, mathematics and statistics; Jennifer Stucker, School of Art; Liangfeng Sun, physics and astronomy;…


Union contract bears fruit for BGSU lecturers

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees had a full house for its afternoon business session Friday. Being the last meeting of the academic year, the board had approvals for tenure and promotion on its agenda. The room was packed with those faculty, their colleagues, and family. One even came via Skype from across the Atlantic. Others, however, couldn’t attend because they had final exams to give. Friday’s list was larger than usual with 81 names. That full house represents the fruit of new provisions in the university’s contract with the BGSU-Faculty Association, which sets guidelines for non-tenured track faculty to be promoted. Of the 81 on the promotion and tenure list, 23 lecturers were promoted to senior lecturer and 17 instructors were promoted to lecturer. Also, 14 associate professors were promoted to full and 27 assistant professors received tenure and promotion to associate professor. (Complete list: http://bgindependentmedia.org/faculty-celebrate-milestones-as-bgsu-trustees-act-on-promotion-tenure/) Arts and Sciences Dean Ray Craig said later that the contract has meant procedures are more uniform across the colleges. As dean he had the most names to read – 48, with 33 of those were for promotions within the NTTF ranks. General Studies Writing had the most. Over the next few years the numbers of NTTF promotions will decline, he said,  as those eligible now will have already been promoted. NTTF faculty – instructors, lecturers, senior lecturers – make up 33 percent of BGSU’s full-time faculty on the main campus. In other action from the trustees’ Academic Affairs Committee, the full board approved the merger of the departments of German, Russian, East Asian Languages and…