Bowling Green State University

Mazey will receive 80-percent of president’s salary as emeritus in 2018

President Mary Ellen Mazey will receive 80 percent of her salary next year serving as president emeritus at Bowling Green State University. Mazey announced at Friday’s Board of Trustees meeting that she would be stepping aside from her position as of Dec. 31 after six years on the job. The trustees voted to grant her emeritus status later in the meeting. Mazey will remain at the university through the end of her contract, which runs through June, 2019. She said her new position will allow her to do what she loves, raise money. Her efforts will be focused on large donors. Mazey will also assist in transition and finding a new president. BGSU launched the public phase of its “Changing Lives for the World” comprehensive fundraising campaign. The stated goal is $200 million, but at the launch Mazey indicated the campaign could raise much more than that. Trustees named Provost Rodney Rogers to serve as interim president. David Kielmeyer, chief communications officer for the university, said that in 2018 Mazey will receive 80-percent of her salary, $339,600. In the final six months of her contract, she will become a member of the faculty, and receive compensation of $47,819, based on 50 percent of the top salary for a professor of geography, her academic discipline. Mazey will continue to live in the president’s house on Wintergarden Road for the near future. That’s still being worked out, Kielmeyer said.  


BGSU hopeful new tax on grad students will get cut in conference

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News A provision in the House version of proposed federal tax bill to tax graduate students on the value of their tuition waivers, and that could be devastating for those students. The tax plan has passed both the House and the Senate, and now a conference committee is hashing out the difference in those two bills. The Senate removed the provision about taxing graduate school waivers, which they receive in recognition of the work they do on campus. It stayed in the House bill, however, prompting protests from around the country. President Mary Ellen Mazey told the Bowling Green State University Faculty Senate that’s she’s been actively lobbying legislators both on her own and through other higher education groups, to remove the provision. She sees signs that the new tax will be excised from the budget. “We’re moving in the right direction.” U.S. Rep. Bob Latta (R-Bowling Green) has signed onto a letter that calls for the waivers to remain tax-free, according to his communications director Drew Griffin.  Latta has expressed his concerns about the provision to U.S. Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio), who is on the conference committee, Griffin said. Dean of the Graduate College Margaret Booth said she has not seen the final language so she’s not celebrating yet. To tax tuition waivers would be “would be extremely detrimental to graduate education across the United States.” Those affected at BGSU are hopeful on two fronts. As the original tax was worded, it’s possible that graduate student here would not be affected. Back in 2010,…


BGSU to offer first year students four-year tuition guarantee

By DAVID DUPONT BG independent News Students entering Bowling Green State University will know what their costs will be for their next four years on campus thanks to the new Falcon Tuition Guarantee approved by the Board of Trustees Friday. Sheri Stoll, BGSU chief financial officer, said the plan will allow families to know ahead of time what their costs will be. The guarantee will only apply to the class coming in fall, and each subsequent class. The guarantee is for four years, though extensions for programs that require more than 122 credit hours to complete will be available. Covered by the guarantee are tuition, room and board, mandatory fees, and out-of-state surcharge fees. Among the items not covered are any optional fees, such as legal, green, and media fees, fees for high cost programs, such as aviation, or study abroad. Parking permits and fines are also not covered. Fees related to clubs and extracurricular activities are also not included. Stoll said she was initially “cautious” about the prospect of the guarantee. “I’m starting to feel some excitement,” she said. “For our families this could be a good thing. The unpredictability is something they struggle with.” The legislature has been pushing public universities to establish guarantees by allowing those with guarantees to raise tuition while freezing it at other schools. Stoll said that most public universities are expected to establish guarantees. What price those students will pay must still be approved by trustees. Stoll said she expects to present a proposal for tuition in May. The trustees will also act…


BGSU graduate asks university to say ‘no’ to white supremacists

To Mary Ellen Mazey and Whomever Else May Be Concerned: I graduated from BGSU in 2013 with a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy. During my time as a student, I was heavily involved with both the Office of Residence Life as a Resident Advisor and the Office of Admissions as a Campus Tour Guide. Over the past few years, I have been paying close attention to the state of the world. I am writing this email regarding what I see as the rise of fascism and white supremacy within the past year or so. While white supremacy and fascism have always been with us and are embedded within many of our hallowed traditions (including higher education), the election of Donald Trump has certainly emboldened those who promote these repulsive ideologies. It’s come to my attention that one white supremacist in particular, Richard Spencer, has been bullying his way around the Midwest, seeking to galvanize his movement and to signal to his followers that he’s managed to infiltrate the allegedly liberal bastions of higher education. My friends at the University of Michigan are currently dealing with this problem. Time and time again, I hear of supposedly well-meaning people in authority boasting of a commitment to “free speech.” I don’t think I need to go into the details or the arguments. We are all aware of them. My takeaway is always this: those in power are more afraid of upsetting Nazis/fascists/white supremacists/Alt-Righters than they are committed to protecting the safety and well-being of the most defenseless among us. Those in power seem…


BGSU & UT agreement boosts courses in world languages & cultures

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Before their respective football teams met on the Doyt Perry Stadium turf, the presidents of Bowling Green State University and the University of Toledo met to sign an agreement that promises to be a winner for both institutions. Meeting on the third floor of the Sebo Center overlooking the field where the teams were preparing for kickoff, BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey and UT President Sharon Gaber signed an agreement giving more structure to the course exchanges in foreign languages between the two MAC rivals. That rivalry, Mazey said, is strong in sports, but when it comes to academics, BGSU and UT are committed to collaborating so they can to provide their students the most opportunities. In this case, those opportunities are in foreign languages. UT students already are taking online Italian course through BGSU, and in spring BGSU students will start taking Arabic courses at UT. In 2018 the two schools will share offerings in French and German. “We are pleased to enter into this partnership with The University of Toledo, which will provide exceptional educational experiences for both BGSU and UT students,” Mazey said in a statement announcing the agreement. “As one of BGSU’s core values, we welcome opportunities to collaborate. This agreement combines the strengths of both universities, resulting in efficiencies that support students’ degree completion.” The agreement was prompted by the Governor’s Task Force on Affordability and Efficiency that had state colleges and universities look at under-enrolled and duplicative programs within their region. Foreign languages were identified as a possible…


BGSU research touches lives near and far

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The research agenda at Bowling Green University produces advances in knowledge while having benefits close to home. That was evident at the October Board of Trustees meeting when four recently hired faculty made presentations on their work. In introducing them, Vice President for Research and Economic Engagement Michal Ogawa reported that external grant funding for research has had “a strong upward trajectory.” In the current fiscal year, BGSU has received 7 percent more than 2016, and 2016 had seen a 22-percent increase from the previous year. These grants, he said, are highly competitive. Only 15 percent of applications are successful. The four faculty members presenting – Alexis Ostrowski, chemistry, Julie Halo Wildschutte, biological sciences, Jonathan Bostic, teaching and learning, and Kimberly Rogers, mathematics and statistics – have all been successful in securing external funding. Ostrowski said her research is connected with teaching as well as real world applications and entrepreneurship. She noted that one graduate student Giuseppi Giamanco was a contestant in the 2016 Hatch program. He developed gel beads for use in consumer products to replace chemical ingredients that are now banned because of water quality concerns. Ostrowski said the gel beads are made by combining iron with biopolymers from natural ingredients. One project has phosphate enclosed into the gel beads. These are put into the soil and slowly release their contents. These are being tested on kale plants. “We’ve got some exciting initial results.” Working with Bob Midden, chemistry, they are investigating using the beads to pull the phosphate from animal waste….


BGSU kick off public phase of $200 million comprehensive camapign

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University will host the premiere of its Changing Lives for the World comprehensive campaign Oct. 13 as part of Homecoming Weekend on Friday, Oct.  from 7 to 9 p.m. in University Hall. The special event will include inspirational stories from students, faculty and alumni who are changing lives for the world; tours of the renovated University Hall and Moseley Hall; and musical entertainment.   Guests will also learn more about the four campaign priorities, which include scholarships to support students in all majors, endowed faculty and staff positions to recruit and retain outstanding educators and coaches, creating state-of-the-art facilities and named academic programs and units. Campaign committee co-chair and 1984 BGSU alumnus Larry Benz will give a welcome, and remarks will be made by BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey, campaign committee member and 1975 alumnus Paul Hooker, political science/pre-law student Meg Burrell and political science student Jauntez Bates. More than $104 million has been raised for this comprehensive campaign, which has a goal of $200 million, as of September 2017. Nearly 14,000 individuals made outright gifts, new pledges, gifts-in-kind and new planned gifts in 2016-17.


Princeton Review lauds BGSU for being environmentally responsible

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University is among the nation’s most environmentally responsible colleges, according to the 2017 Princeton Review Guide to 375 Green Colleges. The guide, released Sept. 20, profiles colleges “with the most exceptional commitments to sustainability based on their academic offerings and career preparation for students, campus policies, initiatives and activities.” BGSU was on the 2016 list as well. “We are pleased that our sustainability efforts have once again been recognized by the Princeton Review guide,” said BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey. “This recognition honors the students, faculty and staff who have taken leadership roles in making us a more environmentally aware and responsible institution.” In 2012, Mazey signed the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment, lending BGSU’s support to the effort to promote climate neutrality and sustainability. In 2014, BGSU submitted its Climate Action Plan and began to implement it. The Princeton Review chose colleges based on “Green Rating” scores tallied using data from the 2016-17 application. On that application, administrators reported on their sustainability-related policies, practices and programs. Schools with Green Rating scores of 80 or higher made it into the 2017 guide. “The application is immense, time-consuming and all-encompassing,” said Nicholas Hennessy, BGSU sustainability manager. “It incorporates every aspect of the University’s operation and daily activities. Everything from academic course offerings/research, to energy usage, purchasing, student activities, and buildings and everything in between is considered in determining a Princeton ranking. “The Guide is not only a recognition of BGSU’s efforts and accomplishments in sustainability, but also creates a…


BGSU responds to instances of hate speech

The administration at Bowling Green State University has released a statement to the community in response to five instances of white supremacist and anti-gay postings on campus as well as an anti-gay demonstration by several members of an outside group. “These viewpoints do not represent our core values of fostering diversity and a culture of inclusion.,” the messge signed by President Mary Ellen Mazey, Provost Rodney Rogers, and Vice President for Student Affairs Thomas Gibson, states. The statement promises to keep the BGSU community informed of instances when people “spread messages of hate on our campuses.” The message notes that white supremacist groups are targeting campuses across the country. The message outlines what the university can and cannot do. “The University is committed to protecting the open exchange and debate of ideas and opinions. … BGSU cannot shield individuals from ideas that they find unwelcome or even repugnant.” However, it draws a line when such postings deface property, as the stickers did, or violate university policy as other postings do. “Rather than suppressing speech, we can, and will, speak out against individuals or groups that espouse racism, anti-Semitism, intolerance or hate. We will also continue to work to support members of our community affected by such speech.” The message concludes by encouraging those at BGSU to report such instances. The complete message is below. Members of the BGSU community: At Bowling Green State University, we are dedicated to ensuring that all members of our community feel valued, appreciated, respected and safe. We will communicate to you when members of our…


Ralph Wolfe, guiding light of Gish Theater, disappointed by planned move

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Ralph Wolfe, the founder and, until recently, the curator of the Gish Film Theater, has mixed feelings about the venue’s move from its home in Hanna Hall. “I am grateful for the preservation of the Gish sisters name and the fact that there will be a theater on campus,” he said. The Gish Theater will be moved to the theater space in the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Some of the memorabilia of the Gish sisters, now in the Gish lobby, will be displayed in the space. Other items will be sent to the Jerome Library. Wolfe said that through his efforts BGSU has the largest collection of Gish sister memorabilia anywhere other than California and New York. This and other details of the administration’s plans are the source of Wolfe’s disappointment. The university plans to renovate a room in Olscamp Hall to be used for film studies and take the place of the Ralph Wolfe Viewing Center, which contains a collection of more than 3,000 video cassettes and DVDs. The room will be named in Wolfe’s honor. He’s also concerned what will happen to the commemorative seats that recognize donors to efforts to fund the theater and its $500,000 endowment. Wolfe said he was not consulted about the arrangements. “I had no involvement whatsoever.” Describing the approach as “top-down management.” Also last year, the title of curator of the Gish, which had been bestowed on him in 1982 by President Paul Olscamp at the initiation of the BGSU Foundation, was not approved. He was never…


We Are One Team recruits BGSU athletes into its efforts

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News We Are One Team has upped its game when it comes to enlisting student athletes in the efforts to promote inclusion and diversity on campus. The initiative, which was launched by German graduate student Yannick Kluch and a couple other students in January 2016, is now offering Bowling Green State University students athletes the chance to earn a leadership certificate with an emphasis on diversity and inclusion. “One of the challenges we faced is to get student athletes involved,” he said. Some programs especially women’s sports and men’s soccer have been on board since the beginning. Athletes “are so busy with sports and studies. We decided it would be a good idea to have a certificate program that they could apply and have something to put on their resume, something related to them as student athletes.” WA1T reached out to the Center of Leadership, which already has a program in place. Kluch said WA1T tailored it to fit the concerns of student athletes. One of those signing up is Mandy Washko, a swimmer and vice president of WA1T. She’s been involved in WA1T since last year, and sees the importance for herself and her fellow athletes “Often inclusion and diversity pushed on us,” she said. This is a way to encourage student athletes to become leaders. Teams typically have people from all over the country and even the world. To be a team leader, she said, she has to understand other people and their experiences. The training Yannick said will help student athletes reflect…


BGSU not ready to tee off yet on corporate development on Forrest Creason site

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News A plan to bring a company to campus to locate on the site of the Forrest Creason Golf Course is in the very earliest conceptual stage. President Mary Ellen Mazey said that the idea to attract a company, possibly a high tech firm, was at this point little more than a talking point. She did broach the concept recently at a luncheon meeting when university retirees when asked about the future of the golf course. She said she’s also discussed it with a number of alumni. Her interest was piqued during a chat with one alumni Mick Story, who works for Jackson National Life. Story, a former Falcon football player, said that Jackson Life located near the Michigan State University campus to have proximity to its future workforce. Such an arrangement could also fit in with the state’s Third Frontier initiative which seeks to develop high tech industry in Ohio. The company could provide internships to students. Mazey noted that the university has a strong program in supply chain management. It also has a record of successful collaboration with outside entities, including the Falcon Health Center, the Falcon Flight Center, and the Bureau of Criminal Investigation lab. But any corporate project is still very much in the conceptual phase. For any property to be leased or sold, the BGSU Board of Trustees would have to take action. While the future use of the 138–acre golf course is what initiated this line of thinking, the university also has other property it could develop, on both…



Mazey addresses sexual assault concerns in State of the University

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In her State of the University address Friday, President Mary Ellen Mazey spoke about the changes in how Bowling Green State University handles sexual assaults. Last spring a student went public with her story of being raped and her futile efforts to have the perpetrator stop harassing her. That prompted a protest and a call for a change in the way BGSU’s approaches the problem. A number of faculty members in Women’s and Gender Studies sent the administration a letter spelling out what they believed should be done. (Story here.) Mazey convened a task force that met over the summer. That task force has issued its recommendations, and the administration has accepted them all. (Story here.) In an interview after the State of the University address, Mazey said that she was impressed with the work the task force accomplished. It was headed by Alex Solis, a former undergraduate student body president who now works in the president’s office, Meg Burrell, the undergraduate student representative to the Board of Trustees, and Dr. Maureen Wilson, of the College of Education. In her address, Mazey promised to work to implement the task force’s recommendations. “As a community, we must all come together to prevent sexual assaults from occurring, make sure survivors are properly supported, and continue to ensure that our investigative processes are thorough, fair, equitable and respectful.” Sarah Anne Rainey, an associate professor in the School of Cultural and Critical Studies, was one of the professors who helped draft the letter last spring to Mazey and…


President Mazey sings praises of state of BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News President Mary Ellen Mazey delivered an upbeat State of the University address Friday at Bowling Green State University. As she spelled out in her talk, the university has scored a number of successes, and its goal is to continue to building on those. Asked afterward what she thought the biggest challenge facing BGSU in the coming academic year was, she prefaced her answer by saying: “Well, sometimes I would say you don’t know the biggest challenge until it’s upon you.” Then she added, “right now I don’t see any major challenges that we can’t take care of.  We recruited a great class, and the challenge is to retain them.” Attracting, retaining, and graduating students remains the focal point for the university. This fall, almost 77.6 percent of last year’s freshmen returned for their sophomore year. That’s 10 percent more than five years ago. That’s still, Mazey said, short of where the university wants to be. “Our goal is to be at 80 percent.” Mazey opened her speech with a long list of national recognitions the university has received. That includes achievement in environmental awareness, safety, entrepreneurial spirit, affordability, and even having the most patriotic football helmets. At first mention the latter drew a laugh, until Mazey continued and noted: “Our helmets list the names of our 111 former students who gave their lives in service to our country.” Sports was also recognized for the academic achievements of student athletes. And Eric Nichols, the men’s soccer coach, was recognized for recruiting two players from Ghana,…