Bowling Green State University

BGSU kick off public phase of $200 million comprehensive camapign

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University will host the premiere of its Changing Lives for the World comprehensive campaign Oct. 13 as part of Homecoming Weekend on Friday, Oct.  from 7 to 9 p.m. in University Hall. The special event will include inspirational stories from students, faculty and alumni who are changing lives for the world; tours of the renovated University Hall and Moseley Hall; and musical entertainment.   Guests will also learn more about the four campaign priorities, which include scholarships to support students in all majors, endowed faculty and staff positions to recruit and retain outstanding educators and coaches, creating state-of-the-art facilities and named academic programs and units. Campaign committee co-chair and 1984 BGSU alumnus Larry Benz will give a welcome, and remarks will be made by BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey, campaign committee member and 1975 alumnus Paul Hooker, political science/pre-law student Meg Burrell and political science student Jauntez Bates. More than $104 million has been raised for this comprehensive campaign, which has a goal of $200 million, as of September 2017. Nearly 14,000 individuals made outright gifts, new pledges, gifts-in-kind and new planned gifts in 2016-17.


Princeton Review lauds BGSU for being environmentally responsible

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University is among the nation’s most environmentally responsible colleges, according to the 2017 Princeton Review Guide to 375 Green Colleges. The guide, released Sept. 20, profiles colleges “with the most exceptional commitments to sustainability based on their academic offerings and career preparation for students, campus policies, initiatives and activities.” BGSU was on the 2016 list as well. “We are pleased that our sustainability efforts have once again been recognized by the Princeton Review guide,” said BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey. “This recognition honors the students, faculty and staff who have taken leadership roles in making us a more environmentally aware and responsible institution.” In 2012, Mazey signed the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment, lending BGSU’s support to the effort to promote climate neutrality and sustainability. In 2014, BGSU submitted its Climate Action Plan and began to implement it. The Princeton Review chose colleges based on “Green Rating” scores tallied using data from the 2016-17 application. On that application, administrators reported on their sustainability-related policies, practices and programs. Schools with Green Rating scores of 80 or higher made it into the 2017 guide. “The application is immense, time-consuming and all-encompassing,” said Nicholas Hennessy, BGSU sustainability manager. “It incorporates every aspect of the University’s operation and daily activities. Everything from academic course offerings/research, to energy usage, purchasing, student activities, and buildings and everything in between is considered in determining a Princeton ranking. “The Guide is not only a recognition of BGSU’s efforts and accomplishments in sustainability, but also creates a clearer plan for what needs to be done to move…


BGSU responds to instances of hate speech

The administration at Bowling Green State University has released a statement to the community in response to five instances of white supremacist and anti-gay postings on campus as well as an anti-gay demonstration by several members of an outside group. “These viewpoints do not represent our core values of fostering diversity and a culture of inclusion.,” the messge signed by President Mary Ellen Mazey, Provost Rodney Rogers, and Vice President for Student Affairs Thomas Gibson, states. The statement promises to keep the BGSU community informed of instances when people “spread messages of hate on our campuses.” The message notes that white supremacist groups are targeting campuses across the country. The message outlines what the university can and cannot do. “The University is committed to protecting the open exchange and debate of ideas and opinions. … BGSU cannot shield individuals from ideas that they find unwelcome or even repugnant.” However, it draws a line when such postings deface property, as the stickers did, or violate university policy as other postings do. “Rather than suppressing speech, we can, and will, speak out against individuals or groups that espouse racism, anti-Semitism, intolerance or hate. We will also continue to work to support members of our community affected by such speech.” The message concludes by encouraging those at BGSU to report such instances. The complete message is below. Members of the BGSU community: At Bowling Green State University, we are dedicated to ensuring that all members of our community feel valued, appreciated, respected and safe. We will communicate to you when members of our community fail to live up to our values, or when…


Ralph Wolfe, guiding light of Gish Theater, disappointed by planned move

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Ralph Wolfe, the founder and, until recently, the curator of the Gish Film Theater, has mixed feelings about the venue’s move from its home in Hanna Hall. “I am grateful for the preservation of the Gish sisters name and the fact that there will be a theater on campus,” he said. The Gish Theater will be moved to the theater space in the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Some of the memorabilia of the Gish sisters, now in the Gish lobby, will be displayed in the space. Other items will be sent to the Jerome Library. Wolfe said that through his efforts BGSU has the largest collection of Gish sister memorabilia anywhere other than California and New York. This and other details of the administration’s plans are the source of Wolfe’s disappointment. The university plans to renovate a room in Olscamp Hall to be used for film studies and take the place of the Ralph Wolfe Viewing Center, which contains a collection of more than 3,000 video cassettes and DVDs. The room will be named in Wolfe’s honor. He’s also concerned what will happen to the commemorative seats that recognize donors to efforts to fund the theater and its $500,000 endowment. Wolfe said he was not consulted about the arrangements. “I had no involvement whatsoever.” Describing the approach as “top-down management.” Also last year, the title of curator of the Gish, which had been bestowed on him in 1982 by President Paul Olscamp at the initiation of the BGSU Foundation, was not approved. He was never told why. On Friday Bowling Green State University issued a…


We Are One Team recruits BGSU athletes into its efforts

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News We Are One Team has upped its game when it comes to enlisting student athletes in the efforts to promote inclusion and diversity on campus. The initiative, which was launched by German graduate student Yannick Kluch and a couple other students in January 2016, is now offering Bowling Green State University students athletes the chance to earn a leadership certificate with an emphasis on diversity and inclusion. “One of the challenges we faced is to get student athletes involved,” he said. Some programs especially women’s sports and men’s soccer have been on board since the beginning. Athletes “are so busy with sports and studies. We decided it would be a good idea to have a certificate program that they could apply and have something to put on their resume, something related to them as student athletes.” WA1T reached out to the Center of Leadership, which already has a program in place. Kluch said WA1T tailored it to fit the concerns of student athletes. One of those signing up is Mandy Washko, a swimmer and vice president of WA1T. She’s been involved in WA1T since last year, and sees the importance for herself and her fellow athletes “Often inclusion and diversity pushed on us,” she said. This is a way to encourage student athletes to become leaders. Teams typically have people from all over the country and even the world. To be a team leader, she said, she has to understand other people and their experiences. The training Yannick said will help student athletes reflect on their own identities. They are seen, he said, through…


BGSU not ready to tee off yet on corporate development on Forrest Creason site

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News A plan to bring a company to campus to locate on the site of the Forrest Creason Golf Course is in the very earliest conceptual stage. President Mary Ellen Mazey said that the idea to attract a company, possibly a high tech firm, was at this point little more than a talking point. She did broach the concept recently at a luncheon meeting when university retirees when asked about the future of the golf course. She said she’s also discussed it with a number of alumni. Her interest was piqued during a chat with one alumni Mick Story, who works for Jackson National Life. Story, a former Falcon football player, said that Jackson Life located near the Michigan State University campus to have proximity to its future workforce. Such an arrangement could also fit in with the state’s Third Frontier initiative which seeks to develop high tech industry in Ohio. The company could provide internships to students. Mazey noted that the university has a strong program in supply chain management. It also has a record of successful collaboration with outside entities, including the Falcon Health Center, the Falcon Flight Center, and the Bureau of Criminal Investigation lab. But any corporate project is still very much in the conceptual phase. For any property to be leased or sold, the BGSU Board of Trustees would have to take action. While the future use of the 138–acre golf course is what initiated this line of thinking, the university also has other property it could develop, on both the west and east side of I-75 and to the…



Mazey addresses sexual assault concerns in State of the University

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In her State of the University address Friday, President Mary Ellen Mazey spoke about the changes in how Bowling Green State University handles sexual assaults. Last spring a student went public with her story of being raped and her futile efforts to have the perpetrator stop harassing her. That prompted a protest and a call for a change in the way BGSU’s approaches the problem. A number of faculty members in Women’s and Gender Studies sent the administration a letter spelling out what they believed should be done. (Story here.) Mazey convened a task force that met over the summer. That task force has issued its recommendations, and the administration has accepted them all. (Story here.) In an interview after the State of the University address, Mazey said that she was impressed with the work the task force accomplished. It was headed by Alex Solis, a former undergraduate student body president who now works in the president’s office, Meg Burrell, the undergraduate student representative to the Board of Trustees, and Dr. Maureen Wilson, of the College of Education. In her address, Mazey promised to work to implement the task force’s recommendations. “As a community, we must all come together to prevent sexual assaults from occurring, make sure survivors are properly supported, and continue to ensure that our investigative processes are thorough, fair, equitable and respectful.” Sarah Anne Rainey, an associate professor in the School of Cultural and Critical Studies, was one of the professors who helped draft the letter last spring to Mazey and served on the task force. “We did a lot of…


President Mazey sings praises of state of BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News President Mary Ellen Mazey delivered an upbeat State of the University address Friday at Bowling Green State University. As she spelled out in her talk, the university has scored a number of successes, and its goal is to continue to building on those. Asked afterward what she thought the biggest challenge facing BGSU in the coming academic year was, she prefaced her answer by saying: “Well, sometimes I would say you don’t know the biggest challenge until it’s upon you.” Then she added, “right now I don’t see any major challenges that we can’t take care of.  We recruited a great class, and the challenge is to retain them.” Attracting, retaining, and graduating students remains the focal point for the university. This fall, almost 77.6 percent of last year’s freshmen returned for their sophomore year. That’s 10 percent more than five years ago. That’s still, Mazey said, short of where the university wants to be. “Our goal is to be at 80 percent.” Mazey opened her speech with a long list of national recognitions the university has received. That includes achievement in environmental awareness, safety, entrepreneurial spirit, affordability, and even having the most patriotic football helmets. At first mention the latter drew a laugh, until Mazey continued and noted: “Our helmets list the names of our 111 former students who gave their lives in service to our country.” Sports was also recognized for the academic achievements of student athletes. And Eric Nichols, the men’s soccer coach, was recognized for recruiting two players from Ghana, and helping to make sure they were able to come…


BGSU student Kyle Jumper-Smith organizes Project Feed Thy Neighbor in Detroit

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING  COMMUNICATIONS Hailed as an economic boon for a struggling city, the rapidly progressing revitalization and gentrification of Detroit neighborhoods has had the unintended consequence of leaving many longtime residents feeling left behind and without ready access to food stores and other essential businesses. But Bowling Green State University  junior Kyle Jumper-Smith has not forgotten about his hometown. Inspired by those who have given generously to him, this summer he organized the second Project Feed Thy Neighbor for his neighborhood, the Cass Corridor. It was a day of empowerment providing food, fellowship and positivity. This year’s event fed 422 people through the help of many donors and 76 volunteers who manned grills, served food, greeted attendees and managed the lines. “It wasn’t just about giving out food but also about uplifting people,” said Jumper-Smith, an inclusive early childhood educationmajor and former Student Leadership Assistant (SLA) in the Center for Leadership . “We challenged our volunteers to reach out to talk with people about what was going on and give each person a positive message of empowerment and a hug. We wanted to create a loving space. “This was a great experience to see the BGSU community collaborate with other students from other institutions and promote positivity and love in a community that is being abandoned due to new business ventures,” he said. “We also had people from Michigan State University, Kentucky State University, Grand Valley State University, Morehouse College and my alma mater, Lewis Cass Technical High School.” He dedicated the event to his late grandmother. “She would have wanted me to do something like this,” he said. “I’m…


Renovated BGSU Traditions buildings get positive reviews

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Tom Gorman came into University Hall looking for his old window. The long-time Bowling Green State University employee and graduate had worked in University Hall a number of years ago, and he visited the now renovated space checking out where he used to sit in a tiny cubicle. The room on the first floor of the 102-year-old building is no longer cramped.  Now home to the Center for Community and Civic Engagement, it is open and full of light. This is the one, or maybe this one is the window, Gorman said, before wandering off to check out the rest of the renovated building and its neighbor Moseley Hall, where he had taken classes. Gorman was one of the employees and community members who strolled through the buildings Thursday during an open house. The public will have another chance to visit the two buildings Saturday (Aug. 12) from noon to 2 p.m. Tours begin at noon and 1 p.m. For her part V. Jane Rosser, the director of the Center for Community and Civic Engagement, said she liked having people like Gorman, “folks who know the building, who worked here, students, people who cleaned and folks from other units” drop by to look at the space. “They’ve been very impressed.” Rosser is impressed as well with the office’s new space. In the 10 or so years the center has been in existence, she said, it has bounced from building to building wherever there was empty office space. “All out of the way,” she said. Now the center is located in a place that’s easy…


Business Insider calls BGSU most affordable college in Ohio

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Affordable and highly ranked. Those were the keys to being placed on Business Insider’s recently published list of the most affordable of the top colleges in every state. Bowling Green State University takes the Ohio spot. “Our faculty members’ teaching skills, research, expertise and involvement in our students’ education are hallmarks of the BGSU experience,” said BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey. “By leveraging their passion, we are able to provide a high-quality education at an affordable cost. We are pleased to once again be recognized for our commitment to affordability and accessibility.” Business Insider used tuition data from the Chronicle of Higher Education to compile the list, which only included colleges and universities rated in the top 220 by U.S. News and World Report. BGSU beat out the other five state universities on the list: Kent State University, Miami University, Ohio University, Ohio State University and the University of Cincinnati. The tuition data are from the 2016-17 academic year and include tuition, fees, and room and board. Earlier this year, Money Magazine placed BGSU on its list of “Best Colleges for Your Money.”


BGSU set to graduate diverse class on Aug. 5

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS A diverse group of 958 people will share a common experience on Saturday morning, Aug. 5. They will receive diplomas from Bowling Green State University. The 9 a.m. ceremony in the Stroh Center will see graduates as young as 18, as old as 71, and 114 who come from 29 other countries. More than half of the total are women. President Mary Ellen Mazey will preside over the ceremony, the 289th in University history. Megan Newlove, chair of the BGSU Board of Trustees, will present diplomas to the degree candidates, of whom 47 have earned associate degrees, including the 18-year-old; 476 bachelor’s degrees, including the 71-year-old; 360 master’s degrees and another 36 doctoral degrees. Eighty will wear the gold cord signifying they are graduating with academic honors based on their high grade-point averages. Students will graduate from all of the BGSU colleges: Arts and Sciences, Business, Education and Human Development, Firelands, Graduate, Health and Human Services, Honors, Musical Arts and Technology, Architecture and Applied Engineering. Addressing the graduates will be Brady Young of Roswell, Georgia, who graduated from BGSU with a degree in business in 1982. Young is principal owner of Strategic Risk Solutions (SRS) and serves as the firm’s president and CEO. SRS sets up and manages insurance companies for various business and institutions. It is the largest independent captive management firm in the world. Young has been with SRS since its inception in 1993 and led the management buyout of the company to establish it as an independent entity in 2002. He has more than 30 years of experience working with…


Africa’s future is here and now

By PATRICK MAKOKORO Mandela Washington Fellow 2017 Bowling Green State University The United Nations estimates that Africa is home to some 200 million people aged 15-24 years old and they predict that this figure will double by the year 2045. Participation by the youth in matters that affect them politically, socially and economically is vital because it has a direct bearing on how they live their lives. Africa’s young and emerging leadership is made of people who have a vision of the continent’s future that is expressed through focused passion and skills. Bowling Green State University (BGSU) is playing a role in this by hosting 25 Young African Leaders for a six week intensive leadership development institute. The Young African Leaders Institute (YALI) is jointly sponsored by the Mandela Washington Fellowship (https://yali.state.gov/washington-fellowship/) and BGSU. The YALI are from 19 African countries: Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Mauritania, Mauritius, Namibia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. As one of the young leaders from Zimbabwe attending the 2017 Institute at BGSU, I am very excited to be amongst my colleagues from countries as far North as Mauritania and as far South as South Africa. The various YALI fellows at BGSU have such depth of knowledge on the immediate challenges of African development that when I see their passion and zeal when discussing their countries’ burning issues, I get really excited. My colleagues have inspired me to look at the world through different lenses particularly when addressing issues like poverty, corruption, hunger and disease. A colleague from Guinea-Conakry, Boubacar Diallo,…


Young African leaders to discuss their aspirations in BGSU Ignite Talk, July 10

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Twenty-five young African leaders will share the work they are doing or plan to do in their home countries or share their thoughts on an issue of importance to them at Ignite Talks July 10, at 7 p.m. in the Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre in Bowling Green State University’s Wolfe Center for the Arts.  The leaders are participating in the 2017 Mandela Washington Fellowship program, which engages young African leaders from the Sub-Saharan region who have established records of accomplishment in promoting innovation and positive change in their organizations and communities. The Ignite Talks are designed to provide a platform for fellows to share the work they are doing or plan to do. The five-minute presentations focus on the overarching themes for this year’s Ignite Talks: empowerment, innovation and servant leadership. The cohort is currently staying at Bowling Green State University, which was selected as an institute partner for the program. The six-week program focuses on civic leadership and engagement and includes activities related to the issue areas of water quality, migration, refugee issues and human trafficking, youth poverty, and women’s, minority and disability rights. The Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders is a U.S. government program funded by the U.S. Department of State and supported in its implementation by IREX. For more information about the Mandela Washington Fellowship, visit yali.state.gov. WHAT: Ignite Talks WHEN: 7-9 p.m. Monday, July 10; doors open at 6:30