Owens Community College

Owens exhibit casts light on teen years of celebrated NYC artist Basquiat

From CONTEMPORARY ART TOLEDO Contemporary Art Toledo and Owens Community College will present Zeitgeist: The Art Scene of Teenage Basquiat. This extraordinary exhibition focuses on the creative community Jean-Michel Basquiat helped galvanize in gritty, pre-AIDS, downtown New York—A time when decay and dissolution fueled a boom in creativity and where the definition of fame, success, and power was not based on money, Facebook likes, or self-promotion. Zeitgeist complements and amplifies the film by Sara Driver, BOOM FOR REAL The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat  released from Magnolia Pictures last May.  Driver teamed with culture critic Carlo McCormick and Mary-Ann Monforton associate publisher of BOMB Magazine, along with the New York gallery Howl! Happening to curate this expansive exhibition which features works and ephemera by Basquiat himself and more than 3o friends and contemporaries, including Nan Goldin, Kenny Scharf, Al Diaz, and Lee Quiñones. Zeitgiest runs from January 25 through March 22. A public reception for the exhibition will be held on Feb. 9 from 5-7 p.m. followed by a public screening of the film BOOM FOR REAL The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat.  Special guest for both the exhibition reception and the film will be curator Carlo McCormick.   Known today for his outsized role in the rise of Neo Expressionism and recent record breaking auction sales, the late Jean-Michel Basquiat was first recognized for his graffiti work in the Lower East Side of Manhattan in the late 1970s and early 1980s. In the emerging artistic circles there, the focus was not on creating content the established art market could readily digest and profit from, but on creating a community that stood in opposition –  fostering unfiltered, uninhibited expression. Basquiat’s work illuminated the contradictions of society – its opposing realities, inequalities, injustices – through a mix of disparate artistic traditions and unrefined, raw emotion fueled by the punk and hip-hop movements of the time. In only a few years, he went from supporting himself through panhandling and selling painted t shirts and postcards while homeless, to being one of the most celebrated artists in New York, bringing the street level politics of what was an underground counter-culture collective with him into…