Articles by David Dupont

Everyone gets into the act at Arts X

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News At Arts X a surprise awaits the visitor around every corner. An actress in a shimmering gown and dramatic blond wig, steps forward to sing “Let It Go.” One of the Living Statues in the lobby of the Wolfe Center, she’s been waiting her turn as other characters have stepped forward to offer a song or monologue. Look up and there’s a pair of eyes projected overhead. Big Sister is watching. As the audience settles for a performance in the Donnell Theatre, someone says she has just posed for a Vogue cover. Two comedians come careening down the hall on the second floor of the Wolfe Center, making a harried entrance into the Heskett dance studio. Do you know there’s an art exhibit, they exclaim. It’s part of the act; we’re all part of the act. There’s always something to see and hear and do at Arts X, and that means there’s always something to miss. There’s always someone new to meet, or an old friend to greet. With the end of the semester looming, and finals and holiday festivities just ahead, artists, performers, writers and their fans took time out to celebrate. Arts X drew hundreds to the Bowling Green State University School of Art and the Wolfe Center Saturday night. The annual event is part art fair, part music and theater festival, part holiday party. Arts X organizers have been tweaking its presentation since the start. This year the Bowling Green Philharmonia offered a prelude of holiday music in the Donnell before the hubbub officially ensued. The theme “Volanti: Seeking Unknown Heights” tied in with the featured guest artists Violet and Fortuna, storytelling acrobats. They performed two shows in the Donnell, sections from their work-in-progress, “Laces.” The piece combined a disembodied voice emerging from the dark to set the scene, a house in Toledo’s Old West End. The scenes introduced the audience to the home’s inhabitants. There was a very tall man, the original owner. There were stuffed toys left behind in a trunk. There was a lesbian couple who made the property bloom with plants and company. These stories were played out with circus arts – aerial work, acrobatics, clowning, tightrope walking. In the most dramatic instances the duo of Erin Garber-Pearson and Kathleen Livingston hung…


BG Area Community Band has plenty to celebrate

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Bowling Green Area Community Band has an added reason to be in a celebratory mood this holiday season. The band is marking its 10th year. It was about 10 years ago that several area musicians, including then Bowling Green High band director Thom Headley and Nick Ezzone, a retired educator and conductor of the North Coast Concert Band, started meeting to discuss the formation of a community band. The ensemble was launched early the next year. So the theme Rejoice! is doubly appropriate for the band’s upcoming concert. The Bowling Green Area Community Band and the BiG Band will perform a free concert Sunday, Dec.11, at 4 p.m. in the Bowling Green Performing Arts Center. The concert will be conducted by Catherine Lewis, the band’s assistant director. She joined five years ago, recruited by Headley, who now directs the band. The program took shape when she found an arrangement of the 16th century hymn “Gaudete,” which means rejoice. In selecting repertoire, she said, “I’m always trying to find something that pushes everyone in the group.” On this concert it is “The Eighth Candle,” a fantasy on Hanukkah themes by Steve Reisteter. After what Lewis called “a very prayerful” opening for the woodwinds, the piece shifts into a vigorous rhythmic section that has the band negotiating through different musical meters. Headley, who was conducting a recent rehearsal, was intent on making sure the band brought out all the harmonic and rhythmic subtleties of the piece. Lewis said that’s important. Playing challenging music makes the band experience more fun for the members and lifts the musicianship of the entire band.  And that translates into deeper playing on everything the band plays. Also on the program will be arrangements of traditional fare including “Carol of the Bells,” “Greensleeves,” “Ding! Dong! Merrily on High” featuring hand bells and popular Christmas songs from the 1950s. The band will play music from the movie “The Polar Express” and conclude with Leroy Anderson’s “A Christmas Festival.” The membership of the band has a range of skills. The ensemble has more than a dozen current or former band directors in its ranks. That includes Lewis who said she was glad to get a chance to pick up her bassoon again when she joined five years ago….


Black Swamp Arts Festival voted best in the state in magazine poll

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Black Swamp Arts Festival received an early gift as preparations get underway  for the 25th festival next September. The readers of Ohio Magazine have voted the Bowling Green festival as Best Art/Fair Festival in the state of Ohio. The results of the readers poll appear in the January issue of the magazine. “It’s great that it’s a reader appreciation award, a community-based reaction, to what we’ve done,” said Todd Ahrens, who chairs the committee that works year-round to stage the festival. “It’s good for the committee to have validation that the work we do as volunteers has meaning to the community. Bringing arts and the community together – that’s what the festival has been about since the beginning.” The 2017 festival will be staged in downtown Bowling Green Friday, Sept. 8 through Sunday, Sept.  10. The festival features musicians from around the world, more than 200 exhibitors in three art shows, arts activities for children, and a range of food and beverage offerings. That diversity of offerings is what sets the festival apart, Ahrens said. “We offer visual and performing arts… and then have this youth arts area that blows people away.” The Chalk Walk competition for high school students was started as a way to engage teenagers.  “We continue to find ways to make it something for everybody,” he said. The festival also features a beer garden and a variety of food vendors. “People enjoy the beer garden in particular and being able to enjoy free music with their friends and have a nice community party.” Looking forward to next September, Ahrens said: “I don’t know that there’s this big thing happening for 25th, but there will be a lot of fun things through merchandise and special performances.” Through its future of the festival committee, organizers are looking toward securing the event’s future for the next 25 years. The committee has quietly launched a drive to set up an endowment with a goal of raising $25,000 in its 25th year. The endowment is through the Bowling Green Community Foundation. The endowment campaign builds on its tradition of relying on a broad base of community donors. “Part of what’s great about the festival is it’s all volunteer,” he said. “People really get involved. We have 800 to 1,000…


Student charged for filing false assault report with campus police

By BG INDEPENDENT NEWS Bowling Green State University police have charged a second student with falsely claiming he was assaulted on campus several weeks ago. Nicholas Davis, 22, had told police on Nov. 15  that he had been assaulted behind the Student Recreation Center, called anti-gay slurs, and had his cell phone stolen. After the initial report, he said his phone had not been stolen and that he found it on the scene. Further investigation by police determined the assault had not occurred. Acting Police Chief Mike Campbell said Davis has been charged and released. He will have a hearing at Bowling Green Municipal Court. Campbell said that his officers spend many times and hours investigating reports and if those reports are false that takes time away from other police operations. Still, he said, a distinction needs to be made between a report that is legitimately a mistake and one that is deliberately false. Campbell said he would never discourage anyone from reporting an incident. “We want them to report those things.” Campbell said that there has been a heightened sense of apprehension on campus since the election, though there has not been an increase in incidents. “It’s just a matter of providing needed support” and helping people in the community and campus understand that BGSU “is a safe and inclusive environment.” Campbell said that Davis had told others that he wanted to bring attention to the problems faced by members of the LBGT community. Bowling Green city police filed charges two weeks ago, against another student who claimed she had been assaulted on Crim Street on Election Night. They determined the report was false. Eleesha Long was charged with falsification and obstructing official business.      


BGSU Lively Arts Calendar through Dec. 9

Dec. 1—The International Film Series concludes with the 1977 film “Neokanchennaia P’esa Dlia Mekhanicheskogo Pianino (An Unfinished Piece for Mechanical Piano),” directed by Nikita Mikhalkov. From Russia’s most well-known contemporary filmmaker, an intriguing story of former lovers who meet at a pre-revolutionary country estate. Casual conversations on social issues and the music of Liszt, Rachmaninoff and Donizetti supply background to a Chekhovian treatment of returning past love. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Dec. 1—Creative writing students in the bachelor of fine arts program will present their work. The reading begins at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Dec. 1—World Percussion Night features multiple styles including performances by the Taiko, Afro-Caribbean and Gamelan ensembles. The concert begins at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171. Advance tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for students and children. All tickets the day of the concert are $10. Dec. 3— BG Philharmonia will perform a Holiday Concert to kick off the 12th annual ArtsX events. The performance will begin at 4 p.m. in the Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Dec. 3—The 12th annual ArtsX will take place from 5-9 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center and the Wolfe Center for the Arts, including the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries, where student and faculty artists and performers show off their talents to the community. The evening includes works from the College of Musical Arts, the School of Art, the Department of Theatre and Film, the Creative Writing Program, the Dance Program, and numerous other organizations, along with holiday shopping. Free Dec. 3—The Annual Faculty and Staff Exhibition opening reception will be held from 5-9 p.m. in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries located in the Fine Arts Center as part of ArtsX events. Free Dec. 4-14—The Annual Faculty and Staff Exhibition will be on display in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Dec. 4— The University Choral Society performs Handel’s…


Piasecki seeks at-large seat on city council

Submitted by ROB PIASECKI Rob Piasecki announced that he has pulled petitions to run for Bowling Green City Council At-Large in 2017. Rob has lived in Bowling Green for the past 34 Years. He and his wife of 21 years Suzanne, a BGSU grad, along with their four children : Rachel, Robbie, Samantha and Hope and dog Hawkeye love Bowling Green. Rob is an alumni of Bowling Green High School (1988) and a graduate of Owens Community College (1996). He is employed by the Dr. Pepper/Snapple group. Rob and his family are members of Peace Lutheran Church. Rob has served the community in numerous ways. He has served with the United Way, a Past Master of the Wood County Masonic Lodge, a volunteer coach for Upward Basketball and with BG Parks and Rec leagues, a judge at the Wood County Fair, and has volunteered at for BG City Schools. Rob has also volunteered for many years at the Black Swamp Atrs Festival, having served as the Volunteer Coordinator . Rob is an alum of Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce Leadership BG. Rob has previously served on BG City Council, lived in all four wards of the city, and has the ability to bring people together to get things accomplished. “I loved my previous experience on council. One of my proudest moments was helping to create Ridge Park.” “I want to make city government work for the citizens” Piasecki said. “Bowling Green has wonderful parks, schools and some of the very best local businesses around. I wants to grow and maintain these excellent community resources.”


Mr. Lemoncello author has soft spot for Bowling Green & its library

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Maria Simon first reaction when she found her name in “Mr. Lemoncello’s Library Olympics” was to call out to her husband. The next was to order a cake. Cake after all is the celebratory food of choice at Mr. Lemoncello’s amazing library. “I just about jumped off my chair,” said Simon, children’s librarian at the Wood County Public Library. The author, Chris Grabenstein, didn’t only name the reference librarian at the fictional Alexandriaville Public Library after Simon, he buried another reference to Bowling Green in the book. The GPS coordinates for Blue Jay Extended Stay Motel where the book’s young heroes find a vital clue are those of the Wood County District Public Library. That makes it a stop for those who do geocaching. A few people have already visited the library because of that. Simon said she didn’t realize that connection until after she contacted the author to thank him for using her name. “He enjoys making his books interactive.” Grabenstein has been known to drop references to places he’s been and people he’s met, as well as other books.  One of the challenges the heroes of the book face is a contest to see who can eat pizza and read at the same time, and then pass a comprehension test. The winning team read Isaac Bashevis Singer’s “Shlemiel Went to Warsaw and Other Stories.” Another character’s favorite book is “Bud, Not Buddy” by Michigan writer Christopher Paul Curtis. The villains in the Mr. Lemoncello books are those who have precious, overly protective attitude toward libraries and books; the heroes are those who want to share their love of reading widely. Grabenstein is no stranger to Bowling Green. Last year on his way to Michigan on a family visit, he visited to promote his book “Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library.” He gave a presentation at the middle school, where his skills as a standup comedian were on full display, Simon said. He loved the town, Simon said, asking if it was used in any movies. “When I saw the town, it looked just like I imagined my fictional Ohio town of Alexandriaville might look,” the author wrote in a recent email. “So I now use photos of BG for reference when I am writing Mr. Lemoncello stories.” “Mr. Lemoncello’s Library…


BG downtown parking holiday in December

Mayor Richard Edwards has declared that there will be no charge to park within city parking lots during the month of December. All other parking regulations will be in effect. The free parking will not include the on-street meters in front of the Wood County Courthouse on Court Street, between North Summit and North Prospect, or the meters in the County Parking Lot. Although the charge for parking will be removed during December in designated spaces, all other parking restrictions, such as the two-hour parking limit, parking in handicapped spaces, prohibition of on-street parking in the downtown from 3 to 5a.m., and other regulations will continue to apply and will be enforced. The mayor encourages businesses, proprietors, and persons working in the downtown to share rides and park in long-term spaces to allow parking turnover for those shopping and/or dining in the downtown.


Stepping off on a healthy holidays experience at BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News As campus returned to life after the Thanksgiving holiday, Bowling Green State University encouraged people, staff, students, faculty and community members, to step into the holidays in a healthy frame of mind. Monday at noontime, several dozen people gathered at Perry Field House to walk around the track. For a portion of that time they hit their stride to holiday tunes sung by the student ensemble Ten40 Acappella, who obliged with a version of “The Twelve Days of Christmas” with the lyrics reworked to encourage healthy habits during the holidays. “Holidays are very stressful times,” said Mary Huff, dean of the College of Health and Human Services. “These are times when we don’t think about our own health, but when we should think about our own health is when were more stressed. We tend to overeat and tend to exercise less. So this is a great time to think about our own health physical health and emotional health.” Among those participating were a group of residents from Brookdale assisted living facility in Bowling Green. These are folks who are already exercising every day, said Alisha Nenadovich, Brookdale activities director. Walking in the field house was “a nice change of scenery.” “They loved to hear the a cappella group sing. That was definitely a plus,” she said. After the walk Paula Davis, the director of the university’s Optimal Aging Institute, gave a presentation on how to navigate a healthy path through the holidays. The festive spirit may not last long into another year, but the pounds out on while being festive certainly will. She said people shouldn’t absolutely deny themselves what they like to eat, they should just control how many of those sweet and fatty treats they consume. Don’t fast before the party, she said. Have a healthy snack that includes protein, complex carbohydrates such as whole grain and a couple glasses of water before heading out. That will curb the hunger. Bring something that’s healthy and tasty to share so there’s something nutritious to eat. Then at the party take a small serving of what you crave, and then head away from the buffet. Move into another room, if possible. Camping out close to the food, is a recipe for constant nibbling. And alternate between drinking wine and…


Arts X reaching for new heights

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Erin Garber-Pearson has performed several times at Arts X at Bowling Green State University. The former teacher in the School of Art feels right at home at the festival that brings all the arts on campus together. Her own work blends sculpture, video, storytelling and aerial acrobatics. That’s a perfect fit for Arts X with its mélange of art sales, exhibits, musical and theatrical performances, all colored by a certain level of tom foolery. When Garber-Pearson and Kathleen Livingston perform at Arts X as Violet and Fortuna on Saturday, Dec.3, the acrobatic storytellers will take the work to new heights. The work-in-progress “Laces” involves two solo and two duet pieces.  The duets require the performers to fly higher. Working as a solo aerialist is challenging enough but working together requires a heightened sense of communication and trust, Garber-Pearson said.  The duo has been working on the duets for three years. Arts X is “a good time to show” what they’ve been working on. The works fits right in to the theme of Arts X 2016:  “Volanti: Seeking Unknown Heights.” The event runs from 5 to 9 p.m. and is preceded at 4 p.m. by a holiday concert by the Bowling Green Philharmonia in Donnell Theatre in the Wolfe Center. Arts X is a free public event. Violet and Fortuna will perform two 20-minute shows, one at 7 p.m. and another at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre. They will be joined by dancers from Auxwerks in Ann Arbor. Also BGSU faculty member Montana Miller will perform. According to the university, the former circus aerialist “will present a personal narrative of the truth behind the romantic image of flight based on her 25-year career as a professional aerial acrobat, from trapeze artist to high diver and now as a competitive, world record holding skydiver. She also will perform a piece to convey her journey through movement using aerial rings that she used to fly on 20 years ago.” Violet and Fortuna’s “Laces” tells the 100-year-old story of house in Toledo. Given Garber-Pearson’s work can’t fit it into one box, Arts X is ideal venue. “For me, it’s an opportunity to show my work to a diverse audience interested in the arts. I like it that it’s the whole campus… all the…


Dr. Lillian Miller joins Women’s Care of Wood County practice

Submitted by WOOD COUNTY HOSPITAL Dr. Lillian Miller is joining Doctors Abeer Ahmed, Ian Leggat, Megan Porter and CRNP Marcia Amstutz in Women’s Care of Wood County. Dr. Miller is a native of Bowling Green and graduated from the Ohio State University. She completed residency training at OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital and most recently came from Sunforest OBGYN Associates where she practiced Obstetrics and Gynecology. She focused primarily on high risk obstetrics, gynecological and breast screenings as well as general genealogical care for women of all ages. Dr. Miller practices faith based medicine and is trained in natural family planning. She is focused on listening to her patients and hearing their concerns and creating a cooperative environment of care between her and her patients. Hours: Mon-Friday 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For an appointment, call 419-352-8427.


Hirzel Canning blends tradition & innovation in products packed with the flavor of Northwest Ohio

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Prohibition knocked Carl Hirzel’s upstate New York brewery out of business, he turned his knowledge of fermentation toward making another product. “He took his technology for making beer and turned it to making sauerkraut,” said his great-grandson Steve Hirzel. By then Carl and his wife, Lena, had joined his brothers in the Toledo area.  “The company literally started in the kitchen,” Hirzel said. Hirzel Canning & Farms continues in operation 93 years later with a fifth generation moving in to keep the firm moving forward. And the company still makes sauerkraut, originally sold under the Deer Lodge brand now as Silver Fleece. Business is good for the tart fermented cabbage, Hirzel, president of Hirzel Canning, told the Bowling Green Exchange Club Tuesday. The company is still looking toward fermentation as a way to develop other products for an increasingly fickle consumer. Hirzel said company’s success is rooted in the Great Black Swamp. “In our backyard we’ve been given a garden to grow our crops. … Half of products we get are within 10 miles of the facility.” Those products now are centered on tomatoes, which the company turns in salsas, pasta and Sloppy Joe sauce and tomatoes in various forms from crushed to whole, in cans and cartons. “Anything you can think of doing with tomatoes we do,” he said, “except paste.” The varieties of tomatoes grown locally are not suited to making paste. They are more like what people would pick from their gardens. They don’t need a lot of processing on their way to the consumer. “We want to heat it up really quickly, sterilize it and put it in the package,” Hirzel said. That’s the difference between the more than 60 products sold under the Dei Fratelli label and its competitors’ products. Working closely with area growers, some who have been associated with the companies for four generations, the company aims to be “picking it when it’s vine ripe, and then putting it in the package right away. You talk about preserving nutrients and color.” Those growers are essential. “They’re family farmers, local,” he said. “We wouldn’t be here if we didn’t have this reliable base.” The company still has a farm at its headquarters in Northwood, where they constantly refine seed varieties to produce…


BGSU Lively Arts through Dec. 5

Nov. 29—Undergraduate and graduate piano students will perform at 7 p.m. at the Wood County District Public Library, 251 N. Main St., Bowling Green. Free Nov. 29—Percussion ensembles will perform at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 30—The Early Music Ensemble will perform at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Dec. 1—The International Film Series concludes with the 1977 film “Neokanchennaia P’esa Dlia Mekhanicheskogo Pianino (An Unfinished Piece for Mechanical Piano),” directed by Nikita Mikhalkov. From Russia’s most well-known contemporary filmmaker, an intriguing story of former lovers who meet at a pre-revolutionary country estate. Casual conversations on social issues and the music of Liszt, Rachmaninoff and Donizetti supply background to a Chekhovian treatment of returning past love. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Dec. 1—Creative writing students in the bachelor of fine arts program will present their work. The reading begins at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Dec. 1—World Percussion Night features multiple styles including performances by the Taiko, Afro-Caribbean and Gamelan ensembles. The concert begins at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171. Advance tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for students and children. All tickets the day of the concert are $10. Dec. 3—Ensembles of the BGSU College of Musical Arts will perform a Holiday Concert as part of the 12th annual ArtsX events. The performance will begin at 4 p.m. in the Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Dec. 3—The 12th annual ArtsX will take place from 5-9 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center and the Wolfe Center for the Arts, including the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries, where student and faculty artists and performers show off their talents to the community. The evening includes works from the College of Musical Arts, the School of Art, the Department of Theatre and Film, the Creative Writing Program, the Dance Program, and numerous other organizations, along with holiday shopping. Free Dec. 3—The Annual Faculty and Staff Exhibition opening reception will be held from 5-9 p.m. in the Dorothy Uber Bryan…


BGSU pianists tickled to play the ivories in public library atrium

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Concerts in the Wood County Library Atrium can take patrons by surprise. They may be perusing the stacks for a novel to read, or hanging out in the Children’s Place when the strains of Bach or Beethoven come wafting through the stacks. Pianists from Bowling Green State University will present another in a series of piano recitals in the atrium Tuesday, Nov 29, at 7 p.m. The concert is presented by the piano department in the Bowling Green State University College of Musical Arts and the library and features graduate students. “It’s turned out to be a good collaboration,” said piano faculty member Thomas Rosenkranz, who is coordinating the concert. “It’s great for our students who get to play not just for their peers” but for people from the community in a situation “where people may be walking around.” “It’s not like a concert situation. That’s good. Those kinds of experiences are great.” “It’s like a promenade,” said Mikhail Johnson, a pianist who performed on an earlier library recital. As someone who aspires to a career as a touring performer and composer, it’s necessary, he said, to play for variety of audiences and in a variety of venues. “People in different places react to music differently. It’s nice to experience that first hand.” The people who show up at the library are different than those who would attend a recital at Bryan Recital Hall, he said. And the atrium has a very different sound than other concert halls. “The acoustics in the atrium are very live,” Johnson said. “As a performer that informs the way you perform. You may want to take a fast piece slower because of how bouncy the sound is. That’s very informative … not every space is the same.” Nor, Rosenkranz noted, is every piano. Pianists must learn to adjust to a variety of instruments. Johnson said the atmosphere in these recitals is more relaxed than those on campus. The performers only play one piece, rather than the entire program. Afterward they get to socialize over cookies with audience members. “Many times you don’t get that direct feedback,” he said. “It’s a very nice experience.” Johnson will not be performing on this recital, but he plans to attend. Music students support each other. “There’s a…


Standing Rock is more than a stand off, it is a movement, local woman believes

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The standoff in Standing Rock, North Dakota, between Lakota and their allies from other Native American tribes is at once a continuation of the struggles between indigenous people and European settlers and their ancestors as well as a promise for a more sustainable future. Anita Jane Britt, of Bowling Green, came back from a recent stay at the Sacred Stone camp on the Standing Rock reservation, convinced of this.  “This is a historic gathering of 556 tribes. I believe this is really a pivotal point in our history. I believe this experience offers a lot of healing to people.” Water protectors, Native Americans and their allies, have gathered to stop the Dakota Access Oil Pipeline going through native land, considered sacred. The pipeline would run under the Missouri River, where any break would pollute the water source of the Standing Rock Lakota. Militarized security forces have arrayed against them. Even as this confrontation continues plans for a more permanent center are underway. “As you kind of go throughout your day you see a whole community growing,” Britt said.  An ecologically sustainable village is being built, including a kitchen, a straw bale school house and what is planned to be “the largest yurt village outside of Mongolia.” Britt, 22, studied Native American history and literature at Bowling Green State University. A graduate of the School of Art, she studied printmaking.  “My art work is largely research based and explores human connections to nature through emotions. Native American religion and mythology informs that very well.” Family lore, she said, has it that there is a Seminole ancestor in her bloodline. This tie to Native Americans is common among those of Scotch-Irish ancestry from the Appalachia. It’s problematic since some settlers claimed native, usually Cherokee, blood so they could make land claims, she said. Sometimes the intermixing was a result of rape or forced marriage. Britt was just returning from a stay in Taos Pueblo, New Mexico, when she heard about the action at Standing Rock. She went to Columbus to protest the state’s sending state troopers to assist the forces backing the pipeline company. While there she met two women who had collected supplies, and needed help delivering them. Britt volunteered. She headed out on Election Day arrived the next morning…