Articles by David Dupont

PathStone paves way to success for young adults

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Amber Wild arrived in Bowling Green last year. Pregnant with no place to go, she headed east from Washington State to stay with a friend. She didn’t have a permanent place to live, had a juvenile record and was pregnant. She was “couch surfing.” Then Wild contacted PathStone in Bowling Green. The private social service and employment agency helped her get a place to live, she said. They helped her find an obstetrician. Helped her find a fast food job and set her up with training to become a State Tested Nursing Assistant. Helped her sign up to get food assistance. PathStone helped with the day-to-day needs as well, providing her with mattresses and dishes. All that she needs, Wild said, “so I can raise my kid correctly.” “They’re definitely more laid back,” Wild said. “They tried to help with everything you might need help with. They don’t limit themselves. I think that’s a good thing. They helped put me on the right path, so I could do what I wanted to do.” PathStone, which is part of a national non-for-profit human services and community development organization with headquarters in Rochester, New York, opened up shop in Bowling Green in January. At first the office was open part time and shared space behind Panera Bread with the Children’s Resource Center. As of Sunday, PathStone has taken over the lease and is open full time, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. off the parking lot behind 143 S. Main St. Operating with a grant from the U.S. Department of Labor, PathStone aims to provide a range of services for Bowling Green residents age 14 through 24. Niki Schroeder, regional administrator, said residency extends to university students, teens in foster care and inmates incarcerated at the Wood County Justice Center or Juvenile Detention Center. PathStone now has 54 participants, she said. It has funding for 125 through the end of December, when the program hopes to get renewed funding for another two years….


Protest: Too many students don’t feel safe on campus & downtown

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The social media reaction after an alleged assault on campus this weekend literally added insult to injury. About 70 students gather Friday at noon to protest what many believe was an anti-gay act, and the social media outburst of homophobic and sexist comments that followed. For Luna, a BGSU student who uses one name, this “exposed the attitudes that people really have.” Those are “very unwelcoming, very uncomfortable.” Luna told those people assembled in the University Oval that: “Here on Bowling Green campus there’s been a severe lack of acceptance, tolerance and civility. … We learn to navigate a world that would rather erase us, but we shouldn’t have to. We as a community need to hold each other accountable. If we begin to hold each other accountable, we can begin to move toward true acceptance, true tolerance because everyone deserves to feel safe on this campus. Everyone deserves to feel safe downtown. … No one should feel unsafe in their own home.” The incident reportedly happened in the early morning hours Saturday. It was first mentioned on the Twitter account BG Crushes, and said four members of a fraternity had attacked a person believed to be gay. However, nothing was reported to neither city nor campus police. Instead the rumor mill began to churn, and the vicious commentary erupted. The university’s dean of students issued a statement saying the university was seeking any information on the assault. BGSU Police Chief Monica Moll was on the scene of Friday’s protest to try to find out what she could. The Bowling Green City Police are investigating an assault at 2 a.m. Sunday in the 100 block of North Main Street when a group of men and women, both black and white, accosted an individual. One suspect struck the victim.  (http://www.bowlinggreenpolice.org/?m=201604) Moll said she didn’t know if this was the assault, or if there was a second incident. In any case she said the comments on social media “are something we should be out here to…


BGSU Student Recreation Center recognized as outstanding by national association

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS When the Student Recreation Center reopened on Aug. 14, 2014, after a year of renovations, students were delighted with the fresh new spaces, sunny lobby, new equipment and additional facilities. Now the building has been recognized with the National Intramural Recreational Sports Association (NIRSA) Outstanding Sports Facilities Award. The award was presented jointly to BGSU Recreation and Wellness and Toledo architects The Collaborative Inc. at the NIRSA Annual Conference and Recreational Sports Expo in Kissimmee, Fla., earlier this month. The NIRSA Outstanding Sports Facilities Awards recognize the innovative designs of new, renovated or expanded collegiate recreational facilities of NIRSA member institutions. Increasingly, research is linking robust recreational programs, facilities and services with student success and satisfaction in higher education. State-of-the art facilities have demonstrated their capacity to greatly enhance the overall student experience, thereby boosting recruitment and improving retention. The annual awards honor facilities that demonstrate excellence in a number of critical areas, including architectural design, functionality and how well the facility meets its intended purpose. Winning facilities exemplify the institution’s commitment to providing the higher education experience desired and valued by students and are considered a standard by which other collegiate recreational facilities should be measured, and from which others can benefit. BGSU’s Recreation Center is featured on the NIRSA website. Students and community members alike are benefiting as a result of the $14.8 million renovation, which was guided in part by their input. In addition to the facility award, BGSU took two, third-place NIRSA awards, in the Student Digital Publication and the Website Design categories. Preparations for the renovation of the Student Recreation Center in 2013 prompted a project to document the history of the center and the University through artifacts, stories and other documents. That project, a digital timeline, was recognized in the Student Digital Publication award. When the Recreation and Wellness staff was going through the building’s basement in preparation for work to begin, they discovered boxes in a storage room. “We found funny pictures of staff from the…


Director of Forensic Science Center at BGSU, Jon Sprague, gets good government award

By BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Dr. Jon Sprague, director of the Ohio Attorney General’s Center for the Future of Forensic Science at BGSU, received the 2016 Good Government Award from the Ohio Pharmacists Association. The award honors pharmacists who have produced major contributions to the public through government and/or legislative service/education at the local, state or national level. A BGSU faculty member and administrator recently earned the 2016 Good Government Award from the Ohio Pharmacists Association (OPA). Dr. Jon Sprague, director of the Ohio Attorney General’s Center for the Future of Forensic Science at Bowling Green State University, received the award during the OPA 138th annual conference held April 15-17 in Columbus. The award honors pharmacists who have produced major contributions to the public through government and/or legislative service/education at the local, state or national level. Sprague, who is also the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation (BCI) Eminent Scholar, has had a critical role in reducing abuse of synthetic drugs by helping to write both state and federal laws on the topic. He began to assist the Ohio Attorney General’s Office in developing rules and laws in an attempt to stay ahead of the clandestine laboratories developing synthetic designer drugs (e.g., bath salts and spices). These efforts have resulted in the enactment of Ohio Administrative Code 4729-11-02 assisting law enforcement based on drug pharmacophores, slight variations in the chemical structures of the drugs that produce the same desired effect. Subsequently, this rule is commonly referred to as the “Pharmacophore Rule.” The language he devised allows the law to flexibly cover various synthetic drugs that are created. Sprague obtained his pharmacy degree from the Ferris State University College of Pharmacy and his Ph.D. in pharmacology and toxicology from the Purdue University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. He has been an active member in OPA for many years. “Jon Sprague is one of many pharmacists who have the passion to provide superior health care to the patients of Ohio,” said Ernest Boyd, OPA executive director, “but he also takes…


Kappa Sigma marks return to campus with camp out to aid Wounded Warrior Project

Kappa Sigma wants to reintroduce itself on campus, so the brothers this week are braving rain and wind to raise money for the Wounded Warrior Project. Kappa Sigma had a chapter on campus until 2013, when code of conduct violations forced it to close. Now, said Isaiah Vazquez, the public relations director for the chapter, they are seeking a second chance. Organization started last fall, and this campout for wounded veterans is their first philanthropic effort. “We’re hoping to bring the name back,” he said. The chapter will promote the ideals of leadership, service to the community and helping others. Vazquez said the group decided to support the Wounded Warrior Project despite recent allegations of the misappropriation of funds. Vazquez said those responsible have been fired. “Now the money’s going into the right pockets.” The fraternity has supported the Wounded Warriors Project in the past. Many of the fraternity’s alumni have served in the military, and a recent pledge has enlisted. Vazquez said that in a way both the fraternity and the charity have taken “similar routes” to try to make up for mistakes. Kappa Sigma, which will get its charter later this year, will have a 12-member house in the new Greek Housing complex, now nearing completion on campus. He said the prospect of living in the new housing is “incredibly exciting.” He expects the new residence will help the chapter with recruitment. The fundraising effort will continue through today at 11:30 p.m. and resume Friday from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. The brothers, who have a tent set up on the Union Oval, had planned to sleep out at the site, but didn’t realize they had to request permission from the university 45 days in advance. Pearse Scudder, one of the brothers on hand Thursday morning, said the paperwork saved them from waking up in a puddle. As it is, they are hopeful the bad weather doesn’t hinder their fundraising efforts. They’ll take what they can get, he said. “From a penny to a million dollars,” Vazquez said….


The Death and the Symphony

By TOM McLAUGHLIN Sr. All five of her children and five of the seven grandkids arrived on Saturday and Sunday in early July, 2014, from Colorado, New York State, and Vermont. On Monday, the children, Tom Jr, Bill, Maureen, Colleen, Pegeen and myself went to the funeral home to make all the arrangements in advance. The ideas were beautiful: all music special to her was recorded and would be played at the wake. The remembrance card was her bucket list. Her passport would be placed in her folded hands. A large bowl of her marble collection would be set out for anyone to take in memory of her. A snack food layout was planned for the day of the wake. It was so well stocked that, and this is a little known fact, some of the younger grandkids had a contest to see who could stuff the most ripe olives into their mouth. Of course, the room would be decorated with so much of her life in pictures, words, and the two volume history and genealogy of the Nellis family. On Tuesday we saw the end wasn’t far off and on Wednesday we knew this was the time. Colleen and I continued her Morphine and she now seemed more peaceful than before. It was Easter when Kathleen was discharged from a short stay in the hospital. On the hospital’s recommendation, I took her to a rehaband in three days brought her home as that wasn’t going to work. The doctor then ordered a hospice evaluation. They came on a Sunday afternoon. We sat on the patio and Kathleen sat there with us but didn’t say a word then. I thought hospice would be a hassle but after a half hour they said she is ready now and home hospice began a few days later and lasted for 38 days until she died. I had told them of the months preceding and how she had begun, almost always in early evening, to ask where were we, why were we here and…


BGSU looking for evidence of weekend incident

The Bowling Green State University Dean of Students has issued a statement about an incident that may have occurred over the weekend. The statement from Jodi Webb reads: “There have been numerous posts on social media in recent days about a fight or assault involving students that may have occurred over the weekend. Neither Bowling Green Police or BGSU Police have received a report about the incident. “We are committed to providing a safe environment for all of our students. Incidents like this will not be tolerated. BGSU will support anyone who may have been harmed. Any students involved may also be held accountable under the Student Code of Conduct. Anyone with information is encouraged to come forward and contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 419-372-2843 or file an incident report. “Respecting one another and fostering diversity and a culture of inclusion is a core value at Bowling Green State University. Let’s all work together to live up to our values.”


Faculty Senate approves new social work program with old twist

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University may become the first university in the country to offer a Master of Social Work with a concentration in Gerontology. The Faculty Senate Tuesday approved the new major. Final approval will be up to the university’s Board of Trustees. The trustees will meet the end of next week. Derek Mason, program coordinator for social work in the College of Health and Human Services, said that recent changes in the accreditation requirements by the Council of Social Work Education has made such specializations possible. The new major is a good fit for BGSU given its current programs in gerontology. Mason said that the college did a needs survey and found that over the next few decades there will be a growing demand for caregivers for the elderly. By 2030, he said, 25 percent of the population in Northwest Ohio will be over the age of 60. As proposed this would be the first MSW “with such a focus and depth of specialization,” Mason said. The program will be designed as a 60-credit-hour program though students with a Bachelor in Social Work will be able to complete the degree in 30 credit hours. The degree will also require 1,000 hours of field internship. The plan is to enroll 20 full-time students and five part-time students each year. At least five courses, especially those focusing on aging issues related to specific ethnic groups, will be offered online. Mason said that the web-centric designation can be misleading. In order to have a blended program with at least one online offering that’s what the program must be called.  


Survey shows most oppose concealed carry on BGSU campus (Updated 4/27/16)

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Most people surveyed at Bowling Green State University oppose allowing concealed carry of weapons on campus. Of more than 5,700 faculty, staff, administrators and students surveyed, 61.4 opposed allowing concealed carry and 38.6 were in favor.  The survey was done by a committee charged with studying the issue after the State House voted to loosen the restrictions on concealed carry on college campus and other currently restricted zones. The bill, House Bill 48, is still before the State Senate. If it became law, the university trustees would have to approve allowing concealed carry on campus. The committee also found a majority would not feel safer if anyone, including students 21 and older, could carry concealed weapons on campus. That was especially true of women, of whom 74.6 percent said they’d feel less safe, and faculty members, 88 percent of whom would feel less safe. Having concealed carry found greatest support among undergraduate males, 42.7 percent of whom said they would consider carrying a weapon if allowed. Alfred DeMaris, a sociology professor and statistician, said the committee made an effort to reach out to all segments of the campus community. The committee distributed 20,338 surveys, and got 5,792 back, a 28.5 percent response rate. While the committee hoped for more, he noted that this was not a target sample, but the entire target population. Graduate students had the best response rate of almost 70 percent, followed by faculty with just shy of 50 percent. Undergraduates had the lowest response rate, under 20 percent. The committee, which was charged to studying the issue and any possible response, did not present a resolution for the senate to act on. The committee had far too many divergent views on the issue to formulate a resolution, said Laura Sanchez, of sociology, who presented the report to senate with DeMaris. In the cover letter to the report, which has been distributed to faculty, committee chair Ian Young wrote: “No clear overwhelming consensus view on CC was found among the respondents, although…


Carbon-based energy sector is collapsing, geophysicist tells BGSU audience

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The tide has turned against carbon-based fuels. That could help assuage the worst effects of global warming that could flood major cities as ocean levels rise and fresh water becomes scarce in the more arid interior. Dr. Henry Pollack, an emeritus professor of geophysics at the University of Michigan, said that the story of alternative energy competing with oil and coal was once perceived as a David vs. Goliath scenario. “The test in front of us,” he told an audience last week at Bowling Green State University, “is to reduce Goliath to David’s level.” That now seems to be happening. In 2010, he said, for the first time investment in alternative fuels, including wind, biofuels, hydrogen fuel cells, fusion and nuclear, outpaced investment in the oil, gas and coal industries. That year $187 billion was invested in alternative fuels compared to $157 billion in fossil fuels. Five years later, he said, investment in alternative fuels had grown by almost $100 billion, while investment in carbon-based technologies had dropped to $130 billion. “I’m telling you we’re at the tipping point,” Pollack said. “Carbon fuels are on the way down and out.” He urged the audience “to follow the money,” and then told the tale through international headlines. The nation’s two largest coal companies have declared bankruptcy. The last deep-pit coal mine in the United Kingdom has closed. The stock price of coal companies is dropping. Saudi Arabia is considering selling its state-owned oil company Aramco. The United States has lifted its 40-year ban on exporting oil. The reasoning being, he said, “let’s let them sell it while they can get something for it.” The dropping price of oil is threatening the budgets in fossil fuel dependent states Alaska and Wyoming, and prompting fears of future bankruptcies on Wall Street. Now, he said, conventional wisdom is that the price of oil is cyclical, and therefore will rise. Pollack said that thinking is wrong. Events like “tremendous instability in the Middle East,” which in the past have…


BGSU’s top tech officer, John Ellinger, wins Ferrari award

Information technology is such an integral part of University life today that when it doesn’t work, many find it nearly impossible to do their work. Keeping BGSU’s technology running, secure and up to date is the ultimate responsibility of Chief Technology Officer John Ellinger. Ellinger was thanked for managing this daunting task as the recipient of the 2016 Michael R. Ferrari Award, the highest honor for administrative staff. Presented April 19 at the annual Administrative Staff Council Spring Reception, the award was accompanied by $1,000 and a reserved parking spot for one year. In addition, Ellinger’s name will be added to a commemorative plaque in the Jerome Library. The Ferrari Award honors administrative staff for superlative performance, showing innovation and initiative, and having a strong relationship with the University community. Ellinger models all three characteristics. “His meticulous nature, longstanding care about the broad educational mission of BGSU, and borderline obsession with consensus building at all stages make him ideally suited for the award,” wrote nominator Dr. Paul Cesarini, assistant vice provost for online and summer academic programs. “Higher education technology administration is mostly a thankless task,” Cesarini said. “When the network is up and things are going well, few people if any will pat you on the back. When some virus or malware sweeps through campus, or some major project runs into implementation issues, you’re often the first person to take the heat. “IT is transparent and yet ubiquitous; everywhere and no where at the same time. Managing and making sense of it all on an ongoing basis — each day, each month, each year — is a challenge so monumentally daunting that I’m still mildly surprised John hasn’t hopped in his car and sped away from campus as fast as he could go. Yet, he’s here.” Here, and continually pushing the envelope to improve BGSU’s information technology and adopt leading-edge systems that meet the campus’s needs, said his nominators. He has spearheaded such initiatives as Voice over IP phone systems, noted Sheri Kellogg, ITS director of applications. “BGSU was…


Art Walk brightens up downtown BG

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The sunny day couldn’t have been better for Cindy Tesznar. The spring weather meant she was comfortable as she sat outside the Ben Franklin store in downtown Bowling Green selling her glasswork, and the sunshine made her bottle trees glow. As a veteran Art Walk participant, she knows the weather isn’t always so favorable, so on Saturday she was enjoying the sun. “The bottles show better outside,” she said. Tesznar was one of dozens of artists who were showing, and many like her, selling their work, as part of the annual event. The work displayed in locations throughout the downtown was created by professional, avocational and student artists. Crim art teacher Noreen Overholt said she was glad that the organizers always included the schools in the event. She was overseeing the art activities and exhibit by her students inside the United Way office. Among the projects was an art cave that students could crawl through to see “cave drawings.” “This gives the kids a chance to participate in a real art show,” she said. “It gives them a chance to share art with their families.” Art Walk also gives the schools a chance to show the community what students are doing and “all the talent they have.” “It’s nice that Bowling Green sponsors so many arts events,” she said. “Look at all the people walking around. It’s good for the whole city.” Amy Craft-Ahrens who owns For Keeps, agreed. On Saturday she was in Ben Franklin helping with that shop’s 40th anniversary sale. She noted the number of people in the store. “On a beautiful sunny day like today, we get a lot of traffic …You see a lot of people walking downtown,” she said. “It’s not necessarily a day that lends itself to significantly larger sales but it brings people downtown and they see what we have offer and even if they’re not buying today, they’ll come back.” While Ben Franklin is celebrating its 40th anniversary on Main Street, Flatlands Coffee is a…


Trinidy Jeter wins BGSU staff rookie honors

By BGSU Office of Marketing & Communications Although she may be a rookie in terms of her time on the job, Trinidy Jeter is a seasoned professional in terms of accomplishment. In her two years at BGSU Firelands as coordinator of student and campus activities, she has had a transformative impact on the campus that has reached out into the community. Jeter was named the Administrative Staff Rookie of the Year at the annual Administrative Staff Council reception April 19. The award recognizes an employee who has been with BGSU between one and three years and who has played a key role in implementing a new idea, program or procedure designed to enhance student recruitment, retention or engagement. Jeter has done all three, say her nominators. “In her short time here at Firelands, she has truly changed our campus climate to one that fosters student engagement, diversity and inclusion,” wrote sociology faculty member Julie Didelot. Under her leadership, the number of student organizations has increased from fewer than 10 to more than 20. She created new opportunities for students to express and develop their interests, forming Firelands’ first a cappella choir and hosting its first drag show and first poetry slam, “The Art of Spoken Word.” “In addition to expanding the number and scope of student organizations, she implemented budget training for student officers as well as training for club advisers,” Didelot said. “Further, she has encouraged student leaders to attend off-campus leadership development conferences, facilitating their ability to attend and escorting them to the conferences.” To further encourage student engagement, she transformed the annual Welcome Back Picnic to a student involvement fair, with booths representing the organizations plus nonprofit community agencies. Jeter made Firelands a part of the Bowling Green campus’s annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service Challenge for the first time this year, engaging students, faculty and staff in community projects. She has found other impactful ways to engage Firelands with the community. “One of Trinidy’s monumental projects was utilizing the common read book, ‘The Other…


Students and colleagues sing their good-bye to James Brown

By FRANCES BRENT Good bye dear, dear Mr. Brown! Saturday 50 of his former students, youthful again despite grey hair and receding hairlines, met at St. Mark’s Lutheran in a Memorial Choir led by Linda Gullufsen, to sing him to his rest. The church was packed with his admirers. The final Hallelujah Chorus drew dozens more singers from the pews for a musical celebration of a man who brought so much beauty and creativity to the young people of Bowling Green. Jim Brown brought greatness to Bowling Green students as they learned to create a beauty that transcended their everyday selves. He made music matter. Bowling Green High School students that didn’t make it through auditions, or that never thought of trying, still experienced an era when music (band was terrific too,) was a source of school cultural pride. Jim Brown and his generations of student musicians were also a source of community pride and for a time almost defined Christmas and summer musical theater in BG. To earn a place as a Madrigal Singer was to be blessed for life and to learn that all that glory of song was the result of very hard work, lots of discipline and major disruption to family life. Less well known was the wide ranging idealism and world view of a class he co-taught with English teacher Dianne Klein that inspired students outside his musical world. Jim Brown was the heart, soul and remarkable leader and inspiration of a truly memorable 50-year song fest that blessed the Bowling Green Schools and the entire community. The Madrigals, the Yuletide Singers, the Summer Musicals were spectaculars in the “Small Town America” that is Bowling Green, Ohio. He gave a musical opportunity that allowed generations of young people to experience the joy of being part of a beauty that took them beyond their everyday selves. He also organized terrific international tours that introduced the great wide world to hundreds of students and lucky chaperones.


Hakels’ glass treasures in “Hot Spot” at Toledo Museum’s Glass Pavilion

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Milt and Lee Hakel have poured their love of art into collecting art glass, and now they’re sharing a few favorite pieces with the world. The Bowling Green couple have four pieces in the exhibit “Hot Spot: Contemporary Glass from Private Collections” now at the Toledo Museum of Art. The show is on exhibit in the Glass Pavilion through Sept. 18. They are happy to have some of their glass treasures included, but Lee Hakel said her husband “was a little bereft when the pieces went off.” Not that the loans to the museum leave gaps in the Hakels’ home decor. The couple has been collecting glass for 20 years, and has no idea how many pieces they own. They are displayed throughout the house, from the sunroom to the bathroom. Milt Hakel said they are attracted to art glass because of its sculptural nature and because of the way glass interacts with light. “It’s so different in different lighting conditions.” The vivid color is evident at every turn as a visitor moves through the house. That’s what greeted Jutta-Annette Page, the museum’s curator for glass and decorative arts when she visited last fall. They got to know the curator through their involvement in the Glass Arts Society meeting in Toledo in 2012, marking the 50th anniversary of the glass arts movement. “The Hakels are serious collectors,” she said. She visited collectors within a 25-mile radius of the museum to find artwork that represents the current directions in art glass, both here and abroad. Of course, the Toledo area is just the right place to do that. The museum was central to the development in art glass. In 1962, potter Harvey Littleton, along with several colleagues, set up a studio to explore the use of glass in art. The efforts took place in the center of commercial and industrial glass production. Dominick Labino was an artist and glass craftsman who provided important insights. Though not in the show, the Hakels own a relic of…