Arts and Entertainment

New Music Festival showcases contemporary music at BGSU, Oct. 19-22

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The 37th Annual Bowling Green New Music Festival will showcase the work of more than 30 guest composers and performers Oct. 19-22. The four-day international festival includes concerts, lectures and an art exhibition. This year’s featured guests include composer Dai Fujikura and the Spektral Quartet (See related stories at: http://bgindependentmedia.org/musical-specters-come-to-life-in-string-quartet-concert-on-campus/ and http://bgindependentmedia.org/music-of-now-intersects-with-classics-in-spektral-quartet-concert/) Organized by the MidAmerican Center for Contemporary Music (MACCM), the College of Musical Arts and the Fine Arts Center Galleries at BGSU, the festival supports the creation of new work and engages both the University and city communities in the process of music appreciation and awareness. Most festival events are free and open to the public. FESTIVAL SCHEDULE Wednesday, Oct. 19 7 p.m., Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery, School of Art Exhibition opening: “The Deathworks of May Elizabeth Kramner,” a mixed media installation by The Poyais Group. Thursday, Oct. 20 1 p.m., Bryan Recital Hall Composer Talk: Dai Fujikura 3pm, Bryan Recital Hall Concert 1: chamber works by Dai Fujikura, Peter Eötvös, Marissa DiPronio, and Chin-Ting Chan. 7:30 p.m., Kobacker Hall Concert 2: Ensemble works by Roger Zare, Takuma Itoh, Dai Fujikura, Christopher Dietz and Jason Eckardt. 9:30 p.m., Clazel Theatre (127 N. Main St., downtown Bowling Green) Concert 3: Works by Dai Fujikura, Anthony Donofrio, Dan VanHassel, Alex Temple, Mario Diaz de Leon, and Matt Marks. Friday, Oct. 21 10:30 a.m., Bryan Recital Hall Concert 4: Chamber works by Steven Stucky, Dai Fujikura, Mary Kouyoumdjian, Girard Kratz, Eliza Brown and Joe Dangerfield. 2:30 p.m., Kobacker Hall Concert 5: Works by James Romig, Chun-Wai Wong, Robert Morris, Marilyn Shrude and Dai Fujikura. 8 p.m., Kobacker Hall Concert 6: Spektral Quartet. Music by Samuel Adams, George Lewis, Mikel Kuehn, and Dai Fujikura. Saturday, Oct. 22 10:30 a.m., Conrad Choral Room, Wolfe Center for the Arts Panel Discussion to be announced 2:30 p.m., Bryan Recital Hall Concert 7: Electroacoustic works by Ravi Kittappa, Daniel Pappas, C.R. Kasprzyk, Mara Gibson, Dan VanHassel, and Mario Diaz de Leon. 8pm, Kobacker Hall Concert 8: Orchestral and wind ensemble works by Dai Fujikura, Jonathan Newman, John Mackey,…


Dancing with the Stars to benefit Safe Communities

From BOWLING GREEN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE On Saturday, Oct. 22, ACT*BG will host Dancing with the BG Stars, with some of the proceeds benefiting Safe Communities of Wood County. Tickets are $40 per person and may be purchased at the Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce, Four Corners Center 130 S. Main Street, by stopping in or calling at (419) 353-7945. There will be concession food and non-alcoholic drinks and a cash bar at the event. The event will feature local BG Community members as our BG Stars. Participants are: Brian Roush and Krista Evans; Eric and Sarah Klotz; Kevin McGill and Carol Lenox; Evan Slates and Stephanie Bell; Matt and Alyssa Karaffa; Mark and Michelle Remeis; and Anthony Stacey. Julie’s Dance Studio is providing professional guidance, practice space and expertise. This night of entertainment will be hosted by BG Chamber investor Nazareth Hall, who is generously donating the use of their facility for this benefit. For more information on this event, contact Marissa Muniz (marissamuniz@bgchamber.net) or checkout the flyer on the Chamber Facebook page. All proceeds from this event will benefit ACT BG & Safe Communities of Wood County. ACT*BG (which stands for Active – Community – Teamwork) is a highly active project team of the Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce. ACT*BG has a mission to attract and retain professionals in the Bowling Green. Their efforts focus on connecting active professionals to each other and to the community through social, civic, charitable, educational, and professional development events.


Piano concert, job coaching all on tap at public library

From WOOD COUNTY DISTRICT PUBLIC LIBRARY The library’s popular “Job Coach,” HR expert Frank Day, will be available Wednesday, October 5 starting at 9:30 am to provide advice on polishing your resume, exploring online job sites, or filling out an online application. Please call ahead, 419-352-5050,  to make an appointment for your half-hour session with Mr. Day. “Tablet and Smartphone Classes,” presented in partnership with the Wood County Committee on Aging and the BGSU School of Media and Communications, will be held Tuesday, October 4 and 11 at 6:15 pm in the 2nd Floor Meeting Room. These classes are structured to suit your needs and to help you to get the most from your phone or mobile device. Registration is required. For details and to register call the Senior Center at 419-353-5661. A popular concert series which showcases graduate students in piano studies at BGSU’s College of Musical Arts returns to the WCDPL Atrium on Monday October 3 at 7 pm. The program features three centuries of keyboard classics from composers such as Bach, Beethoven, Rachmaninoff, Liszt, and Chopin. WCDPL’s full programming calendar, including youth programs and scheduling and selections for its popular book discussion groups during the month of October may be seen on line at wcdpl.org/calendar. These events are free and open to all. For more details about these and other programs for adults at WCDPL, call the library at 419-352-5050.


BGSU Lively Arts Calendar, Sept. 28 – Oct. 12

From BGSU Office of Marketing & Communications  At the Galleries –“Face It: Reimagining Contemporary Portraits” continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery in the Fine Arts Center. “Face It” explores an expanded definition of photographic portraiture. Curated by BGSU art faculty Lynn Whitney and Andrew Hershberger and BGSU Galleries Director Jacqueline Nathan, the exhibit features photos by 27 renowned artists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free. Sept. 29 – Award-winning author and book critic John Freeman will read from his works as a part of the Visiting Writer Series. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Sept. 29 – TheInternational Film Series continues with “Abrazos (Embraces),” directed by Luis Argueta. A group of children travel from Minnesota to Guatemala to meet their grandparents for the first time. The film documents their pilgrimage, exploring family, heritage and immigration. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Sept. 29 – BGSU composition students will present their works at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 30 – TheBGSU Wind Symphony will be in concert at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. On the program are “Skating on the Sheyenne,” by Ross Lee Finney; “Et Exspecto Resurrectionem Mortuorum,” by Olivier Messiaen, and “First Symphony for Band” by William Bolcom. Advance tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for students. All tickets the day of the concert are $10. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171 or visit www.bgsu.edu/arts. Sept. 30, Oct. 1 &2 – Elsewhere performances continue with “boom,” written by Peter Sinn Nachtrieb and directed by Katelyn Carle. All performances will begin at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Oct. 2 – The University and Concert Bands will perform a joint concert, featuring works by Ticheli, Bernstein, Grainger, Sousa and more….


Horizon Youth Theatre presents ‘The Great Cross Country Race’

Submitted by HORIZON YOUTH THEATRE Horizon Youth Theatre is pleased to announce its 2016 fall production, The Great Cross Country Race, written by Alan Broadhurst and directed by Cassie Greenlee. Performances are at Otsego High School, 18505 Tontogany Creek Road, on Saturday October 8 at 2:00 pm and 7:00 pm; and Sunday October 9 at 2:00 pm. Tickets are $5.00 and are available at HorizonYouthTheatre.org or at the door. There will also be a preview at Wood County District Public Library on Saturday, October 1 at 10:30 am, which is free and open to the public. This show features human-like animals who make more sense than the people do. Assembled for Sports Day, the animals cannot find anyone to compete with Ms. Fleet the hare in the cross-country race until Ms. Sloe the tortoise agrees to challenge her. In the course of the race, the scatter-brained hare is easily diverted, particularly by encounters with humans, while the tortoise plods slowly and steadily to the finish line. Only the animals speak intelligible language; the humans’ gobble-de-gook is as incomprehensible to the audience as it is to the animals. The human language, referred to as gobble-de-gook, or “gibberish” by the cast and production team, was created by Keith Guion. Only one character, Basket the Dog (played by Thomas Long), can understand both the animals and the humans, and occasionally provides translation. The cast and production team are as follows: The Animals: Dark the Rook – Calista Wilkins Sett the Badger – JJ Poiry Warren the Rabbit – Amalia Cloeter Spiney the Hedgehog – Grace Holbrook Paddle the Rat – Isaac Douglass Brush the Squirrel – Maddox Brosious Basket the Dog – Thomas Long Sloe the Tortoise – Sophi Hachtel Fleet the Hare – Scarlet Frishman The Humans: Jackie – Terra Sloane Robin – Anita Kukeli Fisherman – Aidan Funk Maude – Sky Frishman Georgina – Bella Truman Mr. Urban Notcouth – Bob Walters Mrs. Urban Notcouth – Katie Partlow Brandi Notcouth – Alexandra Roberts-Zibbel Sophia Notcouth – Narnia Rieske Farmer Black – Daniel Cagle Mrs. Stainer – Anne…


3B’s “Young Frankenstein” laughs off Halloween spooks

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News   Get a jump on Halloween with shrieks of laughter rather than shrieks of fear. The folks at 3B Productions will present the musical stage version of Mel Brooks’ “Young Frankenstein” this weekend with shows Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and a Sunday matinee at 2:30 at the Maumee Indoor Theater, 601 Conant St., Maumee. Joe Barton, the show’s director and a founder of the troupe, said the inspiration to stage this Mel Brooks classic came from last fall’s Halloween-themed show, “The Addams Family.” Seeing Randy “Beef” Baughman as Lurch, he and others thought he’d make a great Frankenstein’s monster. Perfect casting, aside from the challenge of finding a tux that fits him. In “Young Frankenstein,” Mel Brooks imagined Frederick Frankenstein following in his grandfather Victor’s footsteps and creating a monster of his own. Brooks, as was his wont, turned the horror of the original and its multiple retellings, on its head and into a relentless comedy. “There’s not sad moment in the show,” Barton said. “Even the love songs are comedic.” Baughman’s son, Will, was cast as Frederick. They’ve shared the stage before, most recently in a very different seasonal musical. In spring Will Baughman played Jesus in “Jesus Christ Superstar” while Randy Baughman played the high-strutting high priest Caiaphas . “Young Frankenstein,” Barton said, gives the younger Baughman a chance to play a lighter, comic role. “It’s fun to watch them work together,” the director said of the father-son duo. With Janine Baughman, Randy’s wife and Will’s mother, as musical director the show as much a family affair for the Baughman’s as it is for the Frankenstein’s. Brooks did a seamless translation of his hit movie to the stage, adding a few musical numbers. Usually when doing a show that has a movie version, Barton advises against watching the film. Actors can pick up the tics of the screen performers. But in this case he told them to go ahead because he wanted to capture the anarchic energy of the original. Brooks wrote all the…


Face It exhibit at BGSU takes intimate look at portrait photography

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News   Photographic portraits have always had their allure. Think of those ghostly images staring back at you from 19th century daguerreotypes. Viewers will find the contemporary descendants of those models in Face It: Reimagining Contemporary Portraits now on exhibit at the Bryan Gallery in the Fine Arts Building on the Bowling Green State University campus. Recently this reporter was treated to a tour of the show accompanied by the three curators and two photographers who have work in the exhibit. The seed for Face It was planted with a passing remark by Jacqui Nathan, the gallery director, to Lynn Whitney, who teaches photography at BGSU. How about a portrait show? Nathan asked. That casual suggestion took a couple years to gestate, but with the help of art historian Andrew Hershberger it has now come to fruition. Photo portraits are “very common,” he said, “Very familiar.” We carry them around with us in our wallets, on our telephones. We have identification cards with portraits on them. And we treasure them. In the event of a disaster, after family and pets are safe, people will grab the family portraits. “Arguably this is most common type of photography ever,” he said. “Yet they remain mysterious.” Back in the days of daguerreotypes, “people were frightened of these portraits,” Hershberger said. “The kind of impact portraits can have is pretty dramatic.” That pull is evident in Face It, whether it is the tightly cropped images of photographer Nicholas Nixon and his wife, who in a couple images peers surreptitiously out at the viewer or Greg Miller’s photos of children waiting for the school bus in Connecticut. Those photos were taken near Sandy Hook not long after the horrific school shooting there. Hershberger quotes Miller as saying: “How can anyone not see children, all children, as their own, as nieces and nephews, or even as themselves?” In putting together the show, the curators drew mostly on contemporary works with a few iconic images to set the stage. Three portraits on loan from the Toledo Museum…


GRÜBS ready to unveil new recording

From GRÜBS The Grande Royale Ükulelists of the Black Swamp, a.k.a. the GRÜBS, will celebrate the release of their new CD if you think that way on Tuesday, October 4, at Grounds for Thought coffeehouse, 174 S. Main St. in Bowling Green, from 7:30 to 9:00 pm. The band will play some of their tunes and CDs will be available for purchase and autographs. The quartet of ükulele players and vocalists are Sheri Wells-Jensen, Jason Wells-Jensen, Anne Kidder, and Geoff Howes. “If you think that way”includes five original songs and seven cover versions ranging from folk (John Prine’s “Paradise”) to 1920s musical (Brecht and Weill’s “Mack the Knife,” sung in German) to classical (Pachelbel’s Canon in D, but done in C) to rock (Chicago’s “25 or 6 to 4”). Recording and releasing “if you think that way”  has involved the talents of many collaborators, most of them local: The CD was recorded at Stone Soup Recording Studios in Maumee by Eric Sills, who also assisted the group with production and arrangements. A guest artist, Dave Fogle of Perrysburg, who runs Dave’s Drum Depot in Toledo, sat in on drums for the original song “Sweet Rebecca.” The cover photograph and album design are by Ashley Donaldson of Findlay. Kate Kamphuis of Bowling Green contributed additional photography. Phil Klum of Phillip Klum Mastering in New York City mastered the recording. For the past three and a half years, the GRÜBS have been entertaining in Northwest Ohio, performing at the Black Swamp Arts Festival, the Downtown BG Art Walk, the BG Farmer’s Market, the Stones Throw Tavern, the Hump Day Revue, Coffee Amici in Findlay, the Sunset Bistro, Leisure Time Winery in Napoleon, National Train Day in Toledo, the Relay for Life, Rhythm on the River in Grand Rapids, the Ohio Chautauqua in Rossford, the Wood County District Public Library, the Wood County Historical Museum, Fremont’s Got Talent, on WTOL Channel 11 and Fox Toledo’s “Daybreak,” on WBGU televsion and WBGU-FM radio, and at many benefits, fairs, and private parties. In 2015, the quartet released Uke Tide, an album…


Carl Allen spreads the love of jazz in Bowling Green

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Jazz drummer and producer Carl Allen told some of those war stories young jazz payers love to hear during his visit to Bowling Green State University. Anecdotes about being in the studio with their musical heroes. About being back stage with a legend like Art Blakey – and getting a life lesson. And the students came ready to play for him, so he could share some of the knowledge he’s accumulated over the years. On Thursday night those in the two big bands, even got the chance to perform with his inimitable beat getting them in the groove. But the stories, the notes, even the groove, was not the main lesson Allen had to share “It’s about love,” he told the students. That’s what he and all the other visiting artists who come to campus are about, the musician said. They love the music, and they want to share that love with students. Whatever criticism he had of their playing, he told those in a master class for jazz combos, was delivered in that spirit. The same spirit in which Blakey brought him up short when Allen was 23 and complained about a drum set provided on a gig. “Do you play the drums or do the drums play you?” Blakey, who’d used the same set, asked him. The way the young musicians can reciprocate is by asking questions. That’s what Allen did when he first arrived on the scene in New York while still a student at William Patterson College in New Jersey. An older drummer told him they let him into the fraternity of jazz drummers because he clearly loved the music. He showed it by being a pest. He constantly asked questions of drumming greats like Philly Joe Jones and Max Roach. He urged students to have that same kind of curiosity. Allen has been on campus since Thursday. In addition to his work in campus, he stopped by the high school to work with the jazz students there Friday morning. He’ll play with the jazz…


BGSU Lively Arts through Oct. 5

Through Sept. 28 — The 33rd annual juried exhibition of Ohio designer craftsmen continues in the Willard Wankelman Gallery in BGSU’s Fine Arts Center. The exhibit showcases works in clay, glass, fiber, wood, metal and mixed media by many nationally recognized Ohio artists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free Through Oct. 6 — “Face It: Reimagining Contemporary Portraits” continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery in the BGSU Fine Arts Center. “Face It” explores an expanded definition of photographic portraiture. Curated by BGSU art faculty Lynn Whitney and Andrew Hershberger and BGSU Galleries Director Jacqueline Nathan, the exhibit features photos by 27 renowned artists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free Sept. 21 – The BGSU Faculty Artist Series features pianist Cole Burger in recital at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 22 – Creative writing students in BGSU’s Master of Fine Arts program read from their work beginning at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Sept. 22 – BGSU The International Film Series features the 2010 Guatemalan film “AbUSed: The Postville Raid,” directed by Luis Argueta. The film conveys personal stories from a small Iowa town that witnessed the May 2008 mass arrest of 400 immigrants at a meatpacking plant. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater in Hanna Hall. Free Sept. 22 – The BGSU Guest Artist Series puts a spotlight on jazz with Carl Allen on percussion. In addition to his work as a drummer, sideman, bandleader, entrepreneur and educator, Allen has more than 200 recordings to his name. His performance begins at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 22 – Elsewhere productions begins the season with “Spineless: A Staged Reading” written by Elise Lockwood and directed by Rebekah Sinewe. The reading will begin at 8 p.m. in the Margit…


Poetry & art all have part in composer Elainie Lillios’ music

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Elainie Lillios’ music emerges from a web of relationships. The composer works closely with the musicians as she’s writing. She meets with the poet whose work inspires her. She reaches beyond music to poetry and art to construct her pieces that merge electronics and acoustic sounds. All those elements are in play as the Bowling Green State University professor of composition works on her newest piece. “Hazy Moonlight” is being funded by a prestigious Barlow Endowment Commission for Music. Lillios had already been discussing composing a piece for the duo of percussionist Stuart Gerber and saxophonist Jan Berry Baker before the Barlow Commission. In fact, it was the performers who suggested she apply. Lillios was one of 12 recipients out of 150 applicants. Lillios had visited them in Atlanta where they were playing on a streetcar during a festival. That’s part of what impressed the composer about the performers. “Just because music is difficult doesn’t mean it can’t be shared with the community,” she said. “They are very committed to this idea of getting music outside buildings, outside the academy, into places new music necessarily doesn’t happen. … They are really fearless performers. They want to engage with the community.” Lillios engages the performers from the very beginning of the composition process. “I like to be in a relationship with the people with whom I work. I’m not the kind of composer who goes into my room and spends six months there to write a piece and says ‘here it is’ without having any collaboration during the process.” Lillios wants them to feel “like they’ve been part of the piece from the very beginning.” Lillios wants to know who the performers’ favorite composers are, particular techniques they like or don’t like, how the piece will fit into their repertoire. The discussions include logistics as well. What instruments can the percussionist expect to have available while on tour? Lillios already has decided the piece will only use soprano and alto saxophones since that’s what saxophonist Berry Baker carries when she…


Roger Schupp’s legacy celebrated in memorial concert, Sept. 25

Percussionists at Bowling Green State University will beat their drums in memory of Roger Schupp Sunday, Sept.25 at 3 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center on campus. Schupp, who taught percussion and jazz at BGSU for almost 25 years, died Dec. 15 at 55. He continued teaching up until a few days before his passing from cancer. The concert will feature performances by his students and colleagues, as well as internationally renowned jazz drummer Carl Allen. Allen will perform Thad Jones’ “Groove Merchant” with the Jazz Lab Band I. Speaking about Schupp and his legacy will be his widow, Tracy Schupp, long-time colleague Jeff Halsey and former student and owner of Black Swamp percussion Eric Sooy. Former student and colleague Olman Piedra will also participate as a special guest. The program will reflect the range of Schupp’s interests and influence. That includes a performance by the faculty jazz ensemble with Halsey, bass, David Bixler, alto saxophone, Isabelle Huang, marimba, Ariel Kasler, guitar, Daniel Piccolo, drums and cymbals, and Charles Saenz, trumpet. Schupp was the drummer for the group throughout his time at BGSU and organized its weekly sessions in downtown Bowling Green venues. Also performing will be a marimba quartet of his students from his last semester, the BGSU Percussion Ensemble, and the Afro-Caribbean Ensemble. A reception will follow the memorial concert. The Missouri native was a versatile performer in the areas of classical, jazz, and world music.  Schupp performed in a variety of ensembles including the Toledo and Austin symphonies, the Kansas City Civic Orchestra, and Austin Jazz Orchestra. He was a member of the Toledo Symphony Percussion Trio, Toledo Symphony Concert Band, and Toledo Jazz Orchestra. Schupp performed on recordings with the Hawk-Richard Jazz Orchestra, the Toledo Jazz Orchestra, the BGSU Jazz Faculty Ensemble and guitarist Chris Buzzelli as well as on recordings of works by composers Samuel Adler, Michael Daugherty, and Shane Hoose. He also performed and recorded with such diverse artists and ensembles as the Royal Ballet of London, New York Voices, Marvin Hamlisch, Tommy Tune,…


Theatergoers will lap up Players’ off-beat dog story “Sylvia”

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In “Sylvia,” one character warns another that if you give a dog a woman’s name you soon start thinking of the dog as a woman. Well, if you cast a fine comic actress as a dog, believe me you will start thinking of her as a dog, a lovable, neurotic, rambunctious, affectionate, and always entertaining dog. With Traci Johnson playing the title dog in A.R. Gurney’s comedy, the Black Swamp Players have done just that. “Sylvia” opens Friday at 8 p.m. in the First United Methodist Church, 1526 E. Wooster, Bowling Green. The comedy continues its run Saturday, Sept. 16, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, Sept. 17, at 2 p.m. and next weekend Sept. 23 and 24 at 8 p.m. and Sept. 25 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $12 and $10 for seniors and students from Grounds for Thought or by visiting www.blackswampplayer.org. The adult comedy, directed by Wayne Weber, is one of Gurney’s explorations of white, upper middle class angst. Greg (Ryan Albrecht) and Kate (Stephanie Truman) are empty nesters in the 1990s who have moved into New York City from the suburbs, and they are experiencing just the city life they were seeking… dinner parties, chamber music concerts, Knicks games. After raising their two children, now away at college, Kate has a blossoming career in education. Her mission is to bring Shakespeare to inner city junior high students. She’s earnest and devoted to her new endeavor. Greg, on the other hand, is at a dead end with his job, which somehow involves money markets. Sort of a vague sitcom dad kind of employment. After another argument with his boss, he flees work for the park. That’s where he meets Sylvia. It’s love at first sight. The play opens with them coming into the apartment for the first time. Other than a collar, there’s little to tell the audience that Johnson is playing a dog. You don’t need to be told. Her high energy and begging for affection does the trick. Johnson is a superb comic actress. She can…


BGSU Lively Arts through Sept. 28

Sept. 14 – The Faculty Artist Series features Caroline Chin, assistant professor of violin. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 15 – BGSU’s creative writing MFA students present their work. Their reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Sept 16 – The first ARTalk of the season features Joshua Kosker, a visiting professor of art in jewelry and metals from Indiana University. Kosker’s work is rooted in contemporary craft and body adornment. His talk will begin at 5:30 p.m. in 204 Fine Arts Center. A reception will follow in the Willard Wankelman Gallery. Free Sept 16 – EAR l EYE: Listening and Looking: Contemporary Music and Art features BGSU doctoral candidates from the College of Musical Arts responding to works of art. The event begins at 7 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St., Toledo. Free Sept. 18 – The Sunday Matinee Series continues at 3 p.m. with two 1919 films, “The Breath of a Nation,” directed by Gregory La Cava, followed by “The Greatest Question,” directed by D.W. Griffith, with Lillian Gish and Robert Harron. In 1919 Griffith was in top form, this being a year of the masterworks “Broken Blossoms” and “True Heart Susie.” However, no less inspired is the gorgeously photographed “The Greatest Question” (by Billy Bitzer, cameraman on all the Griffith features that incredibly busy year). Somehow it has been mysteriously overlooked, yet is no less fascinating and no less a worthy role for the extraordinary, resilient, ageless Lillian Gish. Free Sept. 18 – Celebrate the history and the future of the Bryan Recital Hall, which has undergone major renovations in the last year, including completely new seating, acoustics and lighting. A rededication concert will be held at 3 p.m. in the hall, located at the Moore Musical Arts Center. For details, see: http://bgindependentmedia.org/bryan-rededication-concert-to-raise-funds-for-scholarships/ Sept. 19 – ARTalk features Jess T. Dugan, whose work explores gender, sexuality, identity and community. Named a 2015 White House Champion of Change, Dugan will discuss a decade…


Bryan rededication concert to raise funds for scholarships

The College of Musical Arts will present a rededication concert of the newly renovated Bryan Recital Hall Sunday, Sept. 18 at 3 p.m. in the venue.The concert will feature performances by 38 university faculty and graduate student musicians. Interim Dean of the College of Musical Arts William Mathis will host the concert which will raise money for music scholarships. Tickets are $50. Contact: https://commerce.cashnet.com/cashnetk/selfserve/BrowseCatalog.aspx. Further questions call 419-372-8654. The concert will be followed by a reception and tour of the hall. Brad Cresswell, of WGTE Radio will serve as master of ceremonies. The program will feature music for voice, piano, strings, brass and woodwinds, jazz, and opera and Broadway selections. In his notes for the performance, Mathis writes: “The impact and rich history of music performance, music instruction and community outreach in Bryan Hall is difficult to measure. Notable guests have performed and taught here including names such as David Brubeck, Yo Yo Ma, Ray Brown, Marilyn Horne, John Cage, and BGSU alumna and Pulitzer Prize winner Jennifer Higdon. The hall plays host to featured guest artists, faculty recitals, daily classes and rehearsals, and scores of student performances each year. “ The recital hall was originally supported by a gift from Ashel and Dorothy Bryan. The renovation was made possible by a gift from their son David Bryan and his wife, Myrna.