Campus


New Greek Village creates common ground for BGSU’s sororities and fraternities

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The new houses for Greeks on the Bowling Green State University campus generated smiles from visitors, especially those looking forward to moving in a few days. While the amenities, large bedrooms, kitchens, and open spaces drew raves, it was the sense of togetherness the place would foster that seemed to most warm the hearts of future residents. Delaney Poor, a sister of Delta Gamma, said having the sorority back in its own house will mean “you always have a support system. There will always be someone here for you.” Her Delta Gamma sister Lauren Gillespie said it will allow them “to share their sisterhood in a special place.” One of the features of the new townhouse-style houses is each will have a chapter room, a place big enough to gather all the members of the chapter, including the majority not living in the house, into one place for meetings. Alyssa Karaffa, a 2010 BGSU graduate and member of Alpha Delta Xi, said in the past the larger chapters would have to use several rooms to hold meetings. “We won’t be scattered across campus anymore,” said Molly Post, who will live in the Omega Phi Alpha house. Greeks were given space in Kohl Hall after the old houses were torn down. “It will give us a chance to have a home place to gather have more a sense of sisterhood,” Post said. And, she added, the complex with its uniform look will serve another purpose, to create greater unity within the entire BGSU Greek community. Sarah Waters, director of residence life, said that was one of the goals. The university wants to build on the strengths that Greek organizations bring to campus, and the new housing is a major part of that. Fraternities and sororities focus on academic success, develop leadership skills, and promote philanthropy. All the chapters’ national units have charities they support and the local members rally behind those….


Optimal Aging keynote speaker says we must take getting older into our own hands

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In my many years of covering speeches, I have never jumped up onto the speaker’s back. But in his Optimal Aging Community Fair keynote address Colin Milner, the CEO of the International Council on Active Aging, said we must continue to try new things even as we get older. So when asked for a volunteer – a male volunteer from a crowd that was predominantly female, I raised my hand. The woman sitting next to me made sure he saw it. Milner brought me on stage in Bowling Green State University’s Grand Ballroom. After a few tries – I’m 62 and not as agile as I once was – I bounded awkwardly onto his back. And with my stocky frame astride his stocky frame, he started asking the audience questions. How easy with me on his back would it be for him to climb stairs? Or play with his grandchildren?  Would he be able to catch himself if started to fall? “This is what being inactive looks like,” he said. “Taking David off is what being active looks like. Keeping our  strength as we get older, keeping our power, keeping our agility,  so that at the end of our life … we compress morbidity so that actually are spending as much of our life in optimal health as possible.” Milner said: “Between the ages 35-70, we begin to lose our function. … If we are inactive it continues to decline throughout our life. But if we remain active, we can reduce that loss of function significantly.” During that period we lose 50 percent of our strength. “That’s one of the reasons we decline.” So having me on his back was to simulate that loss of strength, or maybe it’s just his way of exercising. Aging goes beyond the physical. The international expert who has said he wants to change the face of aging, explained how people need to stay…


BG community nudged toward more inclusiveness

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Crowding around the tables at the library Thursday were people of white privilege, people of color, and people who love who they choose to. At one table in the back of the room were four people of different backgrounds with one common link – discomfort and discrimination in Bowling Green. Ayanna Byers, a BGSU graduate student from Pittsburgh, had been in the city for less than three weeks. Longtime Bowling Green residents were telling her about a nearby community, when Byers asked if it was a “sundown town.” The white women at the table didn’t understand, until Byers explained. “It’s a town where if you’re a person of color you shouldn’t be there after sundown.” As a black woman, Byers said she is accustomed to being followed around stores by shop employees. “I’m so used to things happening,” she said, so sometimes she doesn’t even realize it at first. She has only ventured off campus twice since arriving in the city, the first time to an ice cream shop. She was standing at the counter to order, when a white woman and her children pushed in front of her. “It still happens,” Byers said. Sometimes it’s subtle, and impossible to prove. “But you feel it in your gut,” said another person at the table, Krishna Han, who is from Cambodia. “I never knew racism till I came to this country,” said Han, whose skin is brown and who speaks English as his third language. Han said Bowling Green is much more inclusive than a lot of small American cities, but there is room for improvement. At the other end of the table was a white lesbian couple, who told of a less than welcoming experience when they moved to Bowling Green last year. The couple said a neighbor left notes with the words “Dike” and “Lesbo” for them, and tried to injure their dog by putting rat…


Chartwells honors Paulus for dining service at BGSU

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS As Napoleon famously said, “An army marches on its stomach.” Translate that to a university setting, where thousands of students – plus faculty, staff and visitors – must be fed every day in order to keep them functioning at their best. But unlike an army, whose soldiers must eat what they are given, university dining services must be responsive and provide an array of menus to meet an array of tastes and needs. Luckily for BGSU, Dining Director Michael Paulus understands that imperative and is adept at serving up a satisfying experience for his many clients. Paulus works with Chartwells http://www.dineoncampus.com/bgsu/idx.cfm?, a division of Compass Group, which provides dining services for more than 210 colleges and universities around the country, including BGSU. In recognition of his service, Paulus was recently presented the Presidents Circle Award by Chartwells for outstanding achievement in the “Community Pillar” category, which signifies “taking our lead from our guests,” according to Chartwells Regional Vice President Kevin Lyden. Paulus was honored at the company’s annual summit in Chicago. He was among those receiving awards for “Living the Brand Pillars,” which also include cuisine, culture, ideas and people. “Michael was nominated for his award for his work with the BGSU community, his ability to listen to our guests, satisfy their needs, and deliver a ‘WOW’ experience with every meal served,” Lyden said. “Because BGSU students are highly concerned about our planet, the BGSU team has adopted many successful sustainability programs. Parents have often commented that BGSU was chosen specifically because of the attention to special dietary needs. Michael’s forward-thinking leadership is his strongest asset and leads to continuous improvement of the BGSU dining program. “BGSU students are always his first priority. He is constantly thinking about what the team can do to accomplish the next new experience for our BGSU guests. Customer satisfaction rankings have always been high.” This year, BGSU achieved first place in its region…



Optimal Aging panel gets personal about facing challenges

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Optimal Aging Community Fair was all about getting older while remaining healthy in body and mind. Monday’s fair was the first major public event for Bowling Green State University’s newly launched Optimal Aging Institute. For luncheon speakers the event, the Wood County Committee on Aging put together of panel of local residents who have faced the kind of challenges people encounter as they age. Denise Niese, executive director of the committee, said it was not hard to single out those selected. Nancy Wright, Tim Tegge and Dr. Richard Barker are all well known in the community and have bounced back from challenges that would set others back on their heels. A video of Nora Liu, a retired university women’s basketball coach, was also shown.  Though in assisted living herself, she continues to lead exercise classes. Wright, of Grand Rapids, helped her husband run a funeral home and is a very active community volunteer. Her moment of truth came on Feb. 11, 1993, when she wasn’t feeling well and had her husband bring her to the emergency room at Wood County Hospital. There the emergency room doctor missed the signs of a heart attack because no one expects a 50-year-old woman to have a heart attack. The error was caught. She received the proper treatment. Wright not only lived to tell about it, but to preach about her experience, especially to women who may mistakenly think they are not at risk of a heart attack. Wright said that she learned that after menopause women’s risk of heart attack is the same as men’s. She also has a family history of heart disease. It killed her father, and all four of her brothers have heart problems. Tegge, who was born in 1964, was, in his words, “the rookie” on the panel.  He’s been dealing since he was a child with a condition many experience late in life. He had a…


University Chorale holds open auditions

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The College of Musical Arts at Bowling Green State University is pleased to announce open auditions for the 2016-17 season of the University Choral Society.  Highlights of the season will include performances of Handel’s “Messiah” and Johann Sebastian Bach’s “St. John Passion.” The ensemble will perform “Messiah” with soloists and the Toledo Symphony Orchestra on December 4 as part of the symphony’s regular season at the Toledo Museum of Art.  During the spring semester the University Choral Society will perform J. S. Bach’s landmark masterpiece the “St. John Passion” with tenor Christopher Scholl as Evangelist, a variety of soloists, and the BGSU Early Music Ensemble.  The St. John Passion will be performed at Toledo’s Hope Lutheran Church on Palm Sunday, April 9, and at Bowling Green’s First United Methodist Church on Good Friday, April 14. Mark Munson, Director of Choral Activities at BGSU, serves as the director of the University Choral Society.  During his tenure at BGSU he has led the Collegiate Chorale, A Cappella Choir and University Women’s Chorus. He is a past president of the Ohio Choral Directors Association and is currently president-elect of the Central Division of the American Choral Directors Association. The chorus rehearses on Tuesday evenings from 7:30 until 9:30 at the College of Musical Arts, with the first rehearsal scheduled for August 30.  Membership consists of BGSU students and community members from the greater Bowling Green area.  For more information and/or to schedule an audition, please call the college at 419-372-2188.  


Diana Bibler wins People’s Choice Award as NowOH exhibit closes at BGSU (updated)

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Diana Bibler’s “Heart Breaking” got some love from visitors to the annual NowOH art exhibit at Bowling Green State University. Bibler’s acrylic painting won the show’s People’s Choice Award. The honor was announced Sunday after the last day of the show’s two-week run. Artists arrived at the galleries in the Fine Arts Center to collect their work. More than 100 ballots were cast for People’s Choice. “Heart Breaking” was an outgrowth of a family calamity. Bibler’s family had a house fire. In the aftermath, a 90-gallon fish tank was neglected and just kept freezing and thawing. They finally just “shoved it outside” where the bright plastic plants froze inside ice crystals. That was the image that inspired Bibler’s vivid abstraction. The title “Heart Breaking” refers, in part to the fire, but was as much inspired by viewer’s reactions to the art. “It reflects the mood you get from the painting,” Bibler said. Bibler, a graduate of Bowhser High School in Toledo, will be in her third year as a 3-D art major at BGSU. Having been encouraged to be creative by her mother, Bibler has known since age 5 that she wanted to be an artist. She’s already won awards for her felted sculpture “Hero.” She entered the painting into NowOH as a way of getting more visibility for her work, and winning People’s Choice, she said, gives her confidence as she moves forward in her career. BGSU Gallery Director Jacqueline Nathan said that was more than in the previous eight shows, and in line with what she saw as an uptick in attendance. “Every day we were open we had a pretty good number of visitors, and they were enthusiastic,” Nathan said. The Ninth Northwest Ohio Community Art Exhibition exhibit features the work of 56 area artists, from both the university and the community. Entry into NowOH is open to all artists who live in 12 Northwest Ohio counties. All work…


Medium has a message about the complexity of delivering the news

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News It’s hard to get away from the gaze of the four-sided column of mirrors planted in the entryway of the Kuhlin Center. The artwork, Medium, will have students and professors reflecting on their vocations. Medium is a four-sided pillar with two-way mirrors on each side, and a projector as a hidden presence within. The mirrors will capture on the buzz of activity in the lobby of the center, and scrolling down the center of each mirror will be a randomly selected statement starting with either “we” or “they.” Recently artist Erik Carlson, who created the piece, was in the lobby putting finishing touches on the work in the new home for Bowling Green State University’s School of Media and Communication.  At this point what’s reflected is the mess of construction, ladders, buckets, drop cloths, packing boxes and the like. Assisting him is Nicholas Hanna, a Los Angeles computer programmer. Carlson, whose studio Area C is in Rhode Island, said the concept is to mediate the media experience and have students consider what their role as future professionals is in the process of gathering, disseminating and consuming information. The “we” is those who produce and deliver the news. And the “they” are those who are the subject of the news and the consumers. Smack in the middle will be the “I,” the students and faculty learning and teaching about this process. As they read the statement they can consider themselves on both sides. All the while they will be staring themselves in the face. Carlson said that the concept came about as he thought about what the building would be used for. When he discovered that the University Library had a digital archive of The BG News dating back to 1921, he knew he wanted to tap that rich resource. The archive became one of two sources for those “we” and ‘they” phrases. The other is the closed-captioning for the…


BGSU graduation set for Aug. 6; Huntington Bank exec to speak

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University will celebrate its 286th graduation Saturday, August 6 in the Stroh Center. The August graduating class includes 965 candidates. Among the undergraduates, 51 will be presented associate degrees and 545 will be presented bachelor degrees. Of those, 78 have received honors for their high grade point averages. The 336 graduate students include 302 candidates for master’s degrees and 34 for doctoral degrees. BGSU students come from all around the world. This graduating class includes 77 international students representing 26 countries. There is also a wide range in overall age, with degree candidates ranging from 18 to 64. Addressing the graduates will be James E. Dunlap, senior executive vice president of Huntington Bancshares Inc., a $73 billion asset regional bank holding company based in Columbus. Dunlap, who attended BGSU, also serves as director of regional banking and The Huntington Private Client Group. He oversees Huntington’s 10 regional presidents and has been with Huntington, formerly known as Huntington National Bank, for 36 years. The summer commencement ceremony begins at 9 a.m.


BGSU learning community will be gathering health & fitness data on the go

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Freshmen in Bowling Green State University’s brand new Health, Wellness and You Learning Community will be starting out on the right foot — and hand. They will be wearing FitBit® wristband activity trackers as “researchers on their own lives,” according to founding director Dr. Mary-Jon Ludy, public and allied health. “This is a great opportunity for students to get engaged in research using a technology and topic they can understand.” While the students are learning about diet, fitness, work-life-school balance and related wellness topics in their cohort classes, they will also be gathering data that will be used in Ludy’s long-term Freshman Health Study and by senior nutrition majors for their research course projects. What is learned could guide programming to make the BGSU campus healthier for current and future students. Planned as an academic learning community this year, the goal is for Health, Wellness and You to become a residential community in the 2017-18 school year, Ludy said. Aimed primarily at freshmen in academic majors that do not include an introductory class, the learning community kicks off with freshman 1910 classes taught by faculty members in a variety of disciplines. Each class is capped at 20 students. Following their weekly 1910 class sessions, all participants will meet together for a wellness-related seminar. The learning community’s 1910 curriculum builds on courses that have been offered in the past, with some new ones this year, said Kim Brooks, associate director for undergraduate education. “One of the goals is to build a relationship between students and faculty members that will help them become acclimated and make a successful transition to university life,” she said. There is strong evidence that participation in an academic learning community contributes to student retention, Ludy said. Also, undergraduate engagement in research activities promotes future research involvement — all of which strengthen engagement and hands-on learning. Robyn Miller, human movement, sport and leisure studies, two years…


‘Orange Is the New Black’ author to visit BGSU

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Piper Kerman, best-selling author of “Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison” will be on BGSU’s campus Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016 to discuss her book and her life story. Kerman will be presenting as part of the Ordinary People, Extraordinary Stories lecture series sponsored by BGSU University Libraries and its Leadership Council. Dinner will begin at 6:30 p.m. with the presentation following at 7:30 p.m. A VIP event will begin at 5:30 p.m. All events are hosted in the Lenhart Grand Ballroom of the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Tickets for the event are $30 for dinner and $100 for the VIP event and dinner. Tickets are available now at bgsu.edu/libraryevent. Kerman’s book chronicles her 13 months spent in the Federal Correctional Institution in Danbury, Connecticut. In her book she explores the experience of incarceration and the intersection of her life with the lives of the women she met while in prison: their friendships and families, mental illnesses and substance abuse issues, cliques and codes of behavior. Since her release, Kerman has worked tirelessly to promote criminal justice reform. She serves on the board of the Women’s Prison Association, which provides preventative services for at-risk women, works to create alternatives to incarceration, advocates against practices like shackling during childbirth and offers programs to aid reentry into society. In her professional career as a communications consultant with Spitfire Strategies, she has worked on a number of criminal justice issues, including public defense reform, juvenile justice reform and the legal challenge to the “stop and frisk” laws in New York. She is a member of the advisory board for InsideOUT Writers. Kerman’s memoir was adapted into a critically acclaimed Netflix original series of the same name by Jenji Kohan. The Emmy and Peabody Award-winning show has been called “the best TV show about prison ever made” by The Washington Post. Guests with disabilities are requested to indicate if they…


BGSU’s College of Education and Human Development Receives National Accreditation

Bowling Green State University’s College of Education and Human Development recently received accreditation for 2016-2022 under the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) standards. NCATE’s performance-based accreditation system for teacher preparation ensures that teacher candidates are prepared to make a difference in PK-12 student learning. This accreditation decision indicates that Bowling Green State University’s education preparation programs meet rigorous standards set forth by the professional education community. Dr. Dawn Shinew, Dean of the College, acknowledged the importance of the accreditation process in ensuring that BGSU’s graduates are prepared to be effective educators and leaders. The review team, comprised of a prestigious group of educators from around the country, commented that they found BGSU’s students “to be bright; interpersonally engaging; academically serious; extremely fond of their university, college, faculty, and friends; and, with great potential to become education leaders.” Shinew noted, “Our faculty and school partners work collaboratively to ensure that we have quality programs. I am delighted to have affirmation of the good work we do.” BGSU’s program is one of the largest in the state of Ohio and has led the state in developing innovative educator preparation programs, including several dual-license programs. The institution’s long-standing reputation for excellence in education is well-known with many PK-12 administrators from around the country embarking on BGSU in the spring to recruit at the Teacher Job Fair. Providers accredited under NCATE standards, as well as those accredited under the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) Quality Principles, are now served by the single specialized accreditation system for educator preparation in the United States, the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP). More than 900 educator preparation providers participate in the CAEP accreditation system. For more information about the College of Education and Human Development, visitbgsu.edu/edhd. For more information about CAEP, visit http://caepnet.org/.


Multicultural Affairs office looks for common ground between campus & community

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Most of the 40 people who came out for a #Let’sSupportEachOther gathering last week in the university’s Office of Multicultural Affairs were staff members. These counselors and residence life staff are on the front lines when it comes to dealing with students’ concerns. Not only their concerns as students at Bowling Green State University, but the concerns they bring with them to campus. The meeting was called to discuss the recent incidents of black men dying in encounters with police officers, followed by the killing of five police officers on duty during a protest in Dallas. While those in attendance, which included faculty, community members and two campus police officers, need to focus on students’ emotions, they must also deal with their own reactions. Krishna Han, assistant director for diversity, said he found himself in tears on several occasions when watching videos related to the slayings. He had to eventually step back from social media. One black woman spoke of her fears for her son. They live in a suburb of Toledo, and he is repeatedly followed and stopped by police, and he’s been stopped in Bowling Green as well. Some expressed frustration over what they could do; others expressed frustration over the perceived lack willingness of others to take action. Emily Monago, director of the office, said in an interview the next day that she was surprised by the number of people who came out. “We just wanted to provide an opportunity for people to talk.” She said one of the possibilities discussed was how to become more involved with the city’s Human Relations Commission and in the joint city-campus Not In Our Town movement. “How can we do more to promote that and get people involved? Those are some of the conversations we’re having. We’re trying to strategize about how we can make a stronger community connection.” While Bowling Green may seem remote from the settings where…