Campus

BYOB – shoppers urged to bring your own bags

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   It’s the ugly sign of spring – the flimsy plastic bags blowing on trees and bushes. “I bet if you looked out your window wherever you are, you would inevitably see a bag in a tree,” said Wood County Administrator Andrew Kalmar. But we Americans like our plastic bags. It’s estimated we use 6 billion a year to carry home our groceries and other items. Though some are reused to line wastebaskets and pick up after pets, the vast majority are thrown out. During a visit to the Wood County Landfill, the county commissioners noticed the screens around the landfill caked with plastic bags. “It was incredible. There were bags in every tree, in every bush,” Kalmar said. So the commissioners asked the Wood County Solid Waste District to help the region clean up its act. And that has led Amanda Gamby, environmental educator with the county, to start a campaign called “Got Your Bags?” “We’re finding them in pretty large quantities when we go out to pickup,” Gamby said of the plastic bags. “It’s a horrible litter problem,” Kalmar said. “Everybody uses them, but we have to do better.” So local…


BGSU names new VP for student affairs

Bowling Green State University has tapped an administrator from Ball State as its new vice president for student affairs and vice provost. Dr. Thomas Gibson, associate vice president for student affairs at Ball State University, will join Bowling Green State University on July 1. According to a letter to the university from President Mary Ellen Mazey: “His vision for student affairs aligns well with what we strive for at BGSU, that is, a campus environment where classroom and co-curricular activities work together to support student success. As you may have gathered from the title change for this position, the vice president for student affairs and vice provost will have additional interaction with the academic side of the University to further enhance the synergetic relationship between the two.” Gibson has worked for 19 years in higher education including at York and Queens colleges CUNY and the University of Connecticut previous to his job at Ball State University. Those experiences, Mazey’s letter says “provided him with a ground-up view of student affairs. His experience includes serving as an advocate for students along with strategic planning, program development, diversity and inclusion efforts, retention and degree-completion initiatives and budget, resource and facilities management.” Jill…


Rebecca Skinner Green receives BGSU distinguished faculty service award

By BGSU Office of Marketing & Communications In her 20 years with BGSU, Dr. Rebecca Skinner Green, an associate professor of art history, has enhanced the University in myriad ways, from her leadership on the details of merit, tenure and promotion document revisions to the global, bringing scholars and artists from around the world to broaden the community’s horizons. Skinner Green was recognized with the Faculty Senate Distinguished Service Award at the annual Faculty Excellence Awards held April 14. The award is given in recognition of outstanding, continuous service and to highlight the importance of dedicated faculty to the well-being of the University. Skinner Green received a $1,000 cash prize and a reserved parking spot for a year — a useful benefit for someone so involved not only with her own department but with numerous other areas across campus. In her academic “home,” she served multiple times as chair of the art history division in the School of Art, from 2001-06, 2008-11 and again in fall of 2015. “During all of my interactions as an art history faculty member working with Dr. Skinner Green as the chair, she has repeatedly proven herself to be an outstanding leader with exceptional good…


Lawrence Coates’ historical fiction earns top BGSU research award

By BGSU Office of Marketing & Communications Reading Dr. Lawrence Coates’ fiction is to be immersed in another era, from the California of the first settlers to its vineyards during Prohibition and even the first dot-com bust of the 1990s. Coates achieves this resonance in part through assiduous research, making sure that all the subtle details render the sights, sounds, landscape and tenor of the times against which his stories are set. His achievements were recognized with the 2016 Olscamp Research Award, presented to him at the annual Faculty Excellence Awards on April 14. Given annually by the Office of Sponsored Programs and Research to a faculty member for outstanding scholarly or creative accomplishments during the previous three years, the award includes a $2,000 cash prize and a reserved parking spot for a year. Coates, a professor and chair of the English department, has received recognition for his work almost from the beginning. His first novel, “The Blossom Festival,” was chosen by Barnes and Noble for its 1999 Discover Great New Writers program, and he has continued to win kudos and awards ever since on both the regional and national scales. He has been the recipient of the Western States…


BGSU music, art faculty join forces for Puerto Rican project

By BGSU Office of Marketing & Communications College of Musical Arts faculty members John Sampen, Susan Nelson, Nermis Mieses, Kevin Schempf, Conor Nelson and Marilyn Shrude, along with School of Art faculty member Lynn Whitney have been awarded a Glanz Family Research Award for Interdisciplinary Faculty Innovation and Collaboration. Their proposal, Tierkreis, is a multidisciplinary project leading to educational workshops and concert presentations in Puerto Rico and northwest Ohio. This artistic collaboration involves the College of Musical Arts and School of Art faculty in the preparation and presentation of “Tierkreis.” Composed by the late German composer Karlheinz Stockhausen, this major work is comprised of flexible movements based on the signs of the zodiac. The composer has referred to these as “twelve human characters.” The elastic framework of the composition is ideal for interdisciplinary exploration. Additionally, the zodiac “characters” offer a symbolic relationship with the cycle of life, providing a vehicle for discussion and communication with both students and general audiences. Composition professor, Marilyn Shrude, will prepare a version of “Tierkreis” for woodwind faculty members, and Lynn Whitney will develop an accompanying photo display. Next fall, the faculty will travel to Puerto Rico to present performances and workshops of the collaboration…


State kicks in funds for BGSU construction, curling club

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The state’s capital budget includes $25,440,325 for projects in Wood County. More than $17 million is earmarked for work at Bowling Green State University. The budget includes $7,164,200 for campus-wide electrical upgrades and $8,418,500 for campus wide heating ventilation and air conditioning upgrades. BGSU is in the process of renovating two of its oldest buildings, University Hall and Moseley Hall. Another $500,000 is going toward the completion of the renovation and extension of South Hall into a new School of Media and Communications and the integration of WBGU-TV into the program. The state is also contributing $1 million to the university’s development of forensic science programs. Those programs were jumpstarted by the construction of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation lab on campus in 2014. Another $80,000 is going to the Bowling Green Curling Club toward its new facility on Ohio 25 just north of Bowling Green. State Rep. Tim Brown said that the money stems from the fact that changes at the university’s ice arena to improve hockey facilities there eliminated designated curling ice. That means the curling club has been less able to compete on the national and international level. He said the…


BGSU ROTC inducts Jenkins into hall of fame

Bowling Green State University’s Army ROTC program celebrated the 100th anniversary of the ROTC and inducted a new member into its Hall of Fame Friday evening. Retired Marine Corp Colonel Ted Jenkins, a graduate of BGSU who now lives in Toledo, became the first Marine to be inducted into the Hall of Fame. Jenkins, who attended the event with his wife Anne, enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II. After basic training at Parris Island, South Carolina, he was assigned to an engineer battalion. Jenkins attained the rank of sergeant, and after WWII and the end of his enlistment, he transferred to the USMC Reserve. At this time he also entered BGSU under the WWII G.I. Bill. When hostilities broke out in Korea, Jenkins was recalled to active duty in 1950 during his junior year at BGSU. He was commissioned from the ranks and served with the USMC Combat Engineers in Korea in 1951 and 1952. After the Korean War, Jenkins returned to BGSU and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in 1954. After graduation, he worked for Libbey-Owens-Ford for 35 years and retired as the corporate director of human resources. Jenkins remained in the USMC…


Armed walkers’ aim to get concealed guns on campus

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Nearly 35 people with firearms expressed their Second Amendment rights Saturday in Bowling Green as they walked across the campus to downtown and back. Their purpose was to have a dialogue with people about allowing concealed carry on campus. But very few people engaged in conversation with those armed with handguns and rifles. The organizer of the walk, Jeffry Smith, from Cincinnati, towered above the group with his white cowboy hat on top of his 6-foot nine-inch frame. He calmly instructed the group on safety measures – keep long gun muzzles under control, keep chambers empty and safeties on  – and explained the purpose for the walk. “We want to advocate for concealed carry on campuses and spur conversations on gun rights,” Smith said. He has organized similar walks at the University of Cincinnati, Ohio State University, Akron University, and plans one soon at Miami University. “Right now students don’t have a legal choice to carry on campus,” he said. “People ought to have that choice.” But not everyone on campus believes concealed carrying of guns will make it more safe. “I’m here to protest people who I believe are coming to…


Young musicians put down roots in Americana sounds

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News This could be a folk song. Jared Lucas used to play his favorite old time music at home alone. He didn’t know that other people in Bowling Green shared his love of bluegrass, folk, old country. Then one day at Jimmy John’s he spotted a flyer for the Roots Music Club on campus. It looked interesting, so he checked the club out. “I went to the meeting who found like-minded musicians who played the same music I did. We just hit it off. It was like a dream come true.” Well, that happy ending may disqualify it as a true folk ballad, but it does capture the spirit of the Roots Music Club at Bowling Green State University. The club has about 60 musicians who share a devotion for that broad swath of music called roots, or Americana, music. They get together regularly, a classroom in Moore Musical Arts serving as their coffeehouse, front porch or smoky bar. They play their own songs, strum traditional tunes and entertain musical guests. The club has even devoted an evening Beatles covers and another to members doing impersonations of some of their favorite performers. Much of this…


Holocaust survivor witnessed the fruits of hate

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Martin Lowenberg grew to manhood despite the concerted efforts of the Nazis. Lowenberg was 5 when Hitler came to power in 1933, and from then until he was finally liberated 12 years later, his life became increasingly hellish with death always at hand. “I faced the devil,” he said. He lost his younger twin brothers and his parents to the Nazis. He lost his childhood. He did not lose his will to live. All this tragedy, he told, more than 225 in the student union theater at Bowling Green State University, was caused by hate. It is a word he wishes would be banished from the language. It is hatred of people of different beliefs that leads to so much evil. It leads to attacks like those at Columbine, Brussels, and San Bernadino. Hatred of people because of their religion makes no sense, he said. The event was sponsored by BGSU Hillel and the Office of Multicultural Affairs. Showing a slide of his grandparents, he noted that they were buried in their village, but during the Holocaust their gravestones were toppled (and after the war erected again). His parents, he said, were not buried…


BGSU’s Watson honored as 2016 Educator of the Year Award in gerontology

From the BGSU Office of Marketing & Communications The Ohio Association of Gerontology Education (OAGE) will honor Dr. Wendy Watson as “Educator of the Year” tomorrow (April 15) at its 40th annual conference at Youngstown State University. Watson, an associate professor of gerontology, is the coordinator of the undergraduate and graduate programs in gerontology at BGSU. She also serves as the primary graduate faculty adviser and provides mentoring and guidance regarding courses, theses, and other graduate-level projects. According to the association, Watson’s “passion for education, along with the innovative teaching techniques she uses to foster student engagement and motivate students to achieve high academic standards, should be commended.” “I am so pleased to learn that Dr. Watson is receiving this award,” said Dr. Marie Huff, dean of the College of Health and Human Services. “She is very student-centered and she consistently receives high praise from her students and advisees.” The competitively selected award recognizes individuals in Ohio’s educational institutions at any level and/or from Ohio’s aging network who have either used educational programs to improve services to older adults in Ohio or advanced gerontological education and training for students and practitioners. OAGE is an association of educators, researchers, professionals and…


BGSU Lively Arts Calendar, April 13-27

Through April 17—The MFA Thesis Exhibition continues through April 17 in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries at the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free April 14—BGSU vocal students will perform works from various opera scenes. The recital begins at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free April 15—BGSU’s Wind Symphony will perform under the direction of Bruce Moss. The recital begins at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets the day of the performance are $10. Music majors have free admission with ID. To purchase online, visit bgsu.edu/arts. Or call the box office at 419-372-8171. April 16—The College of Musical Arts’ A Capella Choir and University Men’s Chorus will perform in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. The recital begins at 8 p.m. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets the day of the performance are $10. Musical majors have free admission with ID. To…


Education learns new moves in active learning classrooms

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News It’s not even 8 o’clock yet and Susan Kleine’s morning Business 1100 class is already on a roll. As students come in, they gather Sharpie markers, Post-It Notes, tape and colored pipe cleaners from a table at the front. Then Kleine directs them to get into groups of four. The students roll their chairs, some without even getting up, around small tables, also on wheels. The assignment is to design the ideal wallet. Now students face off to question each other about their wallets, or the equivalent, how they use them and what their drawbacks and advantages are. The students, meeting on the second floor of the Education Building, are involved, though they may not be aware of it, in a movement to redesign the university classroom. Bowling Green State University is engaged in an ongoing effort to improve its classrooms. The project is part capital renovation, and part ongoing experiment. These new active learning classrooms have their share of technology, yet the emphasis is on the human touch. They are reshaping teaching on campus. “In traditonal sense, we think of the classrooms as being neat rows of students and the teacher in front…


Refugees test Germany’s services and goodwill

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Across Germany, more than 1 million refugees are packed into school gyms, old military bases, unrented apartments and tents. The influx of the migrants has divided the nation. But where some people see a crisis, Christian Schlegel sees a challenge. Schlegel, who works for a news and documentary channel in Germany and is in the U.S. as part of a journalism exchange program, talked to Bowling Green State University students and faculty Tuesday about the refugees who flooded his country in the last months. Countries like Germany and Sweden were a natural choice for the refugees, some fleeing war and famine, and other trying to escape extreme poverty. “I think they thought we were a relatively rich country,” with good social services, Schlegel said. But the influx of 1.1 million migrants in the nation of 80 million tested the social services and the good will of some Germans. “Germany was unprepared,” Schlegel said, explaining that in 2003, just 127,000 applied for asylum in his country. Processing of the latest refugees has moved slowly. “Refugees have to wait for appointments for several months.” Meanwhile, some Germans have remained welcoming to the migrants, but…


‘Open carry’ walk planned in BG Saturday

An “Open Carry/Firearms Education Walk” is planned for Saturday in Bowling Green. Organizers, who have coordinated such walks on other college campuses in Ohio, will be walking with their firearms from the Bowling Green State University to the downtown area, then back. They plan to eat lunch while downtown. The walk will start at Lot K on the campus at 1 p.m. Bowling Green Police Chief Tony Hetrick said Ohio law allows open carry of firearms in most locations. “It’s completely legal, as long as the person is not barred from possessing a firearm,” he said. Police officers will be made aware, but will not monitor the event. “They are merely walking with an unconcealed firearm. That’s not illegal in any way, shape or form,” Hetrick said. BGSU Police Chief Monica Moll said the organizer Jeffry Smith contacted her though not required to do so. In an email, she said: “He has previously conducted similar walks at the University of Akron, the University of Cincinnati and The Ohio State University.  I have talked to members of the police department at each of those institutions and they said they did not have any safety concerns or problems during Mr. Smith’s event. …