Arts and Entertainment


BGSU student metals and jewelry on display at Wood County library

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Student Metal Arts Council from Bowling Green State University’s School of Art is “Forging Ahead” with an exhibit at the Wood County Public Library. The “Forging Ahead” exhibit features about two dozen works of jewelry and metal art in the library’s display window. The exhibit opened Saturday and continues through April 15.                   The exhibit is part of the effort to teach students in the arts professional skills, said Andrew Kuebeck, the faculty advisor for the council. Those efforts include an entrepreneurship class specifically for visual artists taught by Gene Poor. The exhibit was organized by the council’s treasurer Michaela Monterosso. For her the library was a natural venue for the show. Back in her hometown of Terryville, Connecticut, she would place her work in the local library. “I’d put my piece there and there was so much traffic going in and out of the public library that I got a lot of commissions, so I decided it would be a good opportunity for the Student Metal Arts Council.” The show was open to all who submitted work. “It’s meant to be an encouraging event,” she said. Monterosso wanted to give her fellow students a no-stress chance to display their work. “It’s good for their resumes,” she said, “and good for mine.” The council awarded first prize in the show to Katelyn Turner’s “Mother of Pearl” and second place to Diana Bibler’s “The Hero.” It promotes the council and the work being done on campus by jewelers and metalsmiths. Monterosso was attracted to BGSU by both the reasonable tuition – East Coast art schools are very expensive, she said – as well as the chance to study with Tom Muir, an artist with a national reputation. She incorporates glass in her work, so he was also encouraged by the opportunity to work with Joel O’Dorisio. The work on display uses a variety of materials and techniques such as felting and beading in conjunction with traditional approaches. The Student Metal Arts Council’s mission is to promote artistic improvement and provide opportunities for networking. Students also have the option to participate in events including SOFA (an art and design fair in Chicago), sales at ArtX and the Student Union and trips to the Toledo Museum of Art.          


All the Wolfe’s a stage during Bravo! BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The arts programs at Bowling Green State University threw their doors open to give friends and neighbors the chance to peek in. That meant that as Aaron Hynds squeezed chords out of his tuba the strains of gospel-styled Broadway number wafted in from an adjacent theater. This was all part of the aural and visual hubbub of Bravo! BGSU, which was held Saturday night at the Wolfe Center for the Arts on campus. About 150 BGSU students fiddled, danced, sang, painted, posed, drew and otherwise entertained the 275 attendees at the event. Something was going on around every corner and down every hall and byway in the Wolfe Center. Jazz musicians jammed, and a pianist played familiar tunes. Seamstresses were at work, and a crew was busy constructing the rotating set for the Department of Theatre and Film’s next production “Noises Off!” Film was being edited. In its second year, Bravo! BGSU is intended to raise money for arts scholarships. Twice as many tickets were sold this year as last. (On April 6, the university reported the event raised more than $70,000.) President Mary Ellen Mazey said the gala gives those in the community a chance to see just what kind of talent the university attracts. That included 2015 graduate Mariah Burks, a national honoree for her acting, who returned to entertain Saturday. Burks, now studying theater at Case Western Reserve, said she was pleased to be back in her familiar haunts, and playing a role in an effort to help others study here. Steve Hanson, who graduated 40 years earlier than Burks, was also pleased to be back. He was talking about the animated film “The Prophet,” which he produced. He’ll also be participating in the university’s E-Week on Monday with a lunchtime talk in the School of Business. Hanson called the event “spectacular.” In his talk he spoke of the value of art. “The arts help us to understand each other and understand what we can be.” Elaine Mickel received an MFA from the School of Art in 1983. She knew Mary and Fritz Wolfe, the donors for whom the Wolfe Center was named. The university was a special place, and Bravo! showcased those qualities, she said. Mickel attended with her daughter Laura Jajko, the president of American Frame in Maumee, and son-in-law Reid Jajko. American Frame is involved in its own…


Photographer Jan Bell captures images of nature’s soul with light & time

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Jan Bell’s photographs have a timeless quality. One of the most important ingredients in achieving that sense of chronological suspension is time itself. When Bell travels to the Great West or the shores of Lake Superior, he takes his time, stays awhile, acclimates himself to his surroundings. And waits on the light. On a recent two-week trip to the north he spent the better part of two weeks and all he saw were blue skies. He doesn’t like clear day or, rather, he doesn’t like the harsh shadows the sun produces. So he waits. Luckily, he said, he appreciates the solitude. “Ideally I like to be alone so I have a clear mind to think about what I’m doing. … I don’t get bored. I just enjoy being out there away from people enjoying the wonderful coastline.” Bell studies what he sees before him, looking for the right combination of shade and texture and shape that makes for a telling composition. And he waits for that soft overcast light that smooths it all out. When the moment arrives, he shoots long exposures, up to 30 seconds long, tripping his shutter by remote control. “I’m very meticulous as I shoot. I love the process. The world just slows down. The shooting part, that’s the thrill. Then when I get in the darkroom I know what I have to do.” Back in his studio he refines the look and emotional punch using Photoshop. The result are archival pigment prints, printed on museum grade 100 percent cotton, that make the viewer wonder if the trees, the water and rocks may indeed have souls. These images have attracted national attention and honors. In January, Bell won a M. Reichmann Luminous Landscape grant. The honor includes publication in LensWork magazine. Also this year he learned that the Toledo Museum of Art had acquired one of his prints for its permanent collection. A print of his photograph “Agave” was donated to the museum by Ann Arbor photographer Howard Bond. The museum then accepted it and added it to its permanent collection. With those achievements Bell has been able to check off two more items on his list of career goals. These mark the most recent accomplishments in his mid-life career as an art photographer. In his younger years, Bell, 62, was an avid photographer, but with the demands of family…


BGSU grad Steve Hanson has stories to tell about the art & business of making “The Prophet”

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Steve Hanson returns to Bowling Green State University, he will have stories to tell about telling stories. His story as a multimedia entrepreneur starts with his time at BGSU. “Bowling Green taught me how to think, how to tell a story,” the 1975 graduate said in a recent telephone interview. As a photojournalism major that education included late night calls from Professor Jim Gordon. Hanson, then photo editor of the Key, lived with Joe Darwal, then photo editor of The BG News. When Gordon called it wasn’t just to say hello, it was usually to deliver blunt critiques of their most recent work. “It is that kind of mentoring that takes us to a different level,” he said. Hanson will participate in Bravo! BGSU Saturday in the Wolfe Center for the Arts Saturday from 7 to 10 p.m. For tickets, call 419-372-6780. He’ll show excerpts from the film “The Prophet,” which he produced, from 7:30 to 8 in the Donnell Theatre. (See related story: http://bgindependentmedia.org/2016/03/25/bgsu-putting-on-the-glitz-to-raise-money-for-arts-scholarships/) Then on Sunday he’ll kick off the university’s E-Week activities with a screening of “The Prophet” at 8 p.m., also in the Donnell. On Monday, he’ll discuss the making of the film at a Lunch and Learn session from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in The David J. Joseph Company Business Hub on the second floor of the College of Business. The first stirrings of the film began back in his undergraduate days. That’s when he read Lebanese writer Kahlil Gibran’s inspirational book “The Prophet.” It was a time of great turmoil,” Hanson said, and as a photojournalist he was in the middle of it. He remembers digging a hole to look like a bomb crater to illustrate a story. He was also a pioneer. Working with Gene Poor, he had a “self-proclaimed” minor in visual communications. This was before the days of the Department of Visual Communications Technology. This served him well as he moved from photojournalism into multi-media production. The change is not so radical. It’s all about storytelling, he said. That may be a story about how to be a better employee or why you should insulate your house with Owens-Corning’s signature pink insulation. “Those are all stories,” he said. Some of those industrial productions cost in the seven figures to make, he said. None was on the scale, however, of an internationally distributed feature-length film….


BGSU Lively Arts calendar through April 13

Through April 3—The BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries at BGSU’s Fine Arts Center, and will run through April 3. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free March 30—The Guest Artists series continues with pianists Gulimina Mahamuti and Frank Chiou. The performance begins at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 31—The College of Musical Arts presents a Student Composers Forum, beginning at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 31—The International Film Series continues with the 2014 Russian film ”Leviafan (Leviathan).” Director Andrei Zviagintsev has defended his film as an eternal story against those who saw in it pointed criticism of Russian society. The film follows a family living in a small coastal town in the Murmansk region who confront the mayor, who is trying to take their land and small business. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 2—Bravo! BGSU, a black-tie optional gala, showcases the best of BGSU arts students and faculty. Performances, exhibits, readings and other activities take place throughout the Wolfe Center for the Arts from 7- 10 p.m. Sponsored by PNC, the even raises funds for arts student scholarships. Tickets are $100 per person and are available by contacting the Office of the President at 419-372-6780 or by emailing lmattia@bgsu.edu. For more information, visit bgsu.edu/bravo. April 3—The Sunday Matinee Series continues with “Soundies, Snaders, and Scopitones (1942-67),” a compilation of popular music promotional films that were played on visual jukeboxes and early television from the late 1930s until the early 1970s. Take a tour of the technology, media and culture of these little-known treasures of jazz, rhythm and blues, country and Western, and rock and roll history. The screening begins at 3 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 3—Winners of the 10th annual Doug Wayland Chamber Music Competition will perform at 3 p.m. in the Great Gallery of the Toledo Museum of Art, located at 2445 Monroe St., Toledo. Free April 3—The BGSU Men’s Chorus will present a joint concert with guest ensemble Measure for Measure. The performance begins at 7 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts…


Native people survive in the face of removal, violence

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Faced with recounting the tragic tale of native peoples being expelled from their homelands, historian Stephen Warren decided to begin on a hopeful note. Warren spoke Saturday afternoon at the Toledo Museum of Art on “Indian Removal Then and Now: Legacies of the American Experiment with Ethnic Cleansing.” As he entered, the University of Iowa historian said he overheard someone wondering why they were there on a sunny afternoon to hear about such a “depressing” subject. Warren, who teaches history at the University of Iowa, had anticipated such a response, so first he spoke about how the descendants of those displaced tribes pushed are doing now. “One of the things that is important to me as an educator is to remind audiences that Native Americans are still here,” he said. “There are 567 federally recognized tribes in the United States. Their population is actually growing, not declining. Their traditions are being recovered by a lot of forward thinking, innovative people in those communities. While it’s important to acknowledge the very real hardships facing native people today and the ongoing challenges of colonialism, we also need to celebrate the very real work that native people are doing in Indian Country to continue their traditions into the 21st Century.” The Eastern Shawnee, under the chairmanship of Glenna Wallace, now have assets worth $153 million, own the controlling interest in Peoples Bank of Seneca and have 1,700 acres in property in northeastern Oklahoma. This is a turnaround since 1970 when the tribe was broke and almost landless. Later in the talk, he credited the development of Native American casinos as providing these assets and credited Wallace and others with trying to make sure they can turn that windfall into long-term prosperity. As his talk made clear the concern that gains by native people may prove short lived is well founded in their history of relations with Americans of European descent and the federal government. Warren’s talk was presented in conjunction with the exhibit “Indigenous Beauty: Masterworks of American Indian Art from the Diker Collection,” now on display in the museum through May 8. The Shawnee, Eastern Shawnee, Seneca, Wyandot and Ottawa tribes were doing well back in the early 19th century. They had recovered from the devastation caused by the War of 1812, “really a genocidal war,” Warren said. Now they were farmers, practicing Methodists, who were…


BGSU Lively Arts Calendar, through April 6

Through April 3—The BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries at BGSU’s Fine Arts Center, and will run through April 3. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free March 29—Viola students of Matthew Daline will perform at the Manor House located at Wildwood Metropark, 5100 W. Central Ave., Toledo. The performance begins at 7:30 p.m. Free March 29 —Tuesdays at the Gish series ends this semester with “Girl, Interrupted” (1999). Director James Mangold’s film follows young Susanna, who gets checked into a psychiatric hospital, where she begins to find herself among new friends and enemies. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free March 29—College of Musical Arts students of tuba and euphonium will perform under the direction of David Saltzmann. The recital begins at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 30—The Guest Artists series continues with pianists Gulimina Mahamuti and Frank Chiou. The performance begins at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 31—The College of Musical Arts presents a Student Composers Forum, beginning at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free March 31—The International Film Series continues with the 2014 Russian film ”Leviafan (Leviathan).” Director Andrei Zviagintsev has defended his film as an eternal story against those who saw in it pointed criticism of Russian society. The film follows a family living in a small coastal town in the Murmansk region who confront the mayor, who is trying to take their land and small business. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 2—Bravo! BGSU, a black-tie optional gala, showcases the best of BGSU arts students and faculty. Performances, exhibits, readings and other activities take place throughout the Wolfe Center for the Arts from 7- 10 p.m. Sponsored by PNC, the event raises funds for arts student scholarships. Tickets are $100 per person and are available by contacting the Office of the President at 419-372-6780 or by emailing lmattia@bgsu.edu. For more information, visit bgsu.edu/bravo. April 3—The Sunday Matinee Series continues with “Soundies, Snaders, and Scopitones (1942-67),” a compilation of popular music promotional films that were played on…


Common Good benefit celebrates diversity within community

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Common Good of the UCF is what those it serves make of it. The house at 113 Crim St. is the vortex of activities aimed at bettering the lives of people, and the community they live in. That can involve picking up the exterior spaces with neighborhood cleanups, or it can mean the clearing of interior spaces through meditation. That can mean growing sustenance for the body at two community gardens and a food pantry, or providing sustenance for the mind through discussions about spirituality and current event. And at dinner dialogues those two missions meet. The Common Good of the UCF embraces this broad mission because that’s what people have told them their needs are. The organization’s own needs are simple, but real. On Thursday, April 7, at 6:30 p.m. the Common Good will present “Expressions of Arthenticity,” at the Clazel, 127 N. Main St., Bowling Green. Tickets are $25 and $15 with a student identification. One beverage and a dessert bar come with admission. The show includes a fashion show, live jazz and an auction. Tickets are available at Common Good and Grounds for Thought, 174 S. Main St., or by calling 513-314-4489. Caroline Dawson, the financial developer for Common Good, said that the fashion show, which will start at 7:30p.m., will feature clothing from local boutiques and hair and makeup by local salons. The models will be of all ages, body types and ethnicities. That reflects the philosophy of the Common Good, she said. “We offer diversity here and embrace diversity.” Those who participate range in age from kids in after-school art classes to someone in their 90s attending a dinner dialogue. They have, Dawson said, “different perspectives and different learning abilities.” “Our space is a space in which people embrace who they are, and learn about other people doing the same things,” said Megan Sutherland. “We’re all art work in our own way. We have all these different expressions, experiences and backgrounds and are able to come together as a community. That’s what makes communities rich. This fundraiser is reflecting that and celebrating that.” While the Common Good has had annual fundraisers in the past, Dawson said, this is the first time it has taken this form. “If this goes well,” Sutherland said, “we’d like to make it an annual event.” The fundraiser draws on the talents of the…


BGSU putting on the glitz to raise money for arts scholarships

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In its inaugural year in 2015, Bravo! BGSU got it share of bravos. Lisa Mattiace, chief of staff for President Mary Ellen Mazey, said “thrilling” and “spectacular” were among the words attendees used for the black tie optional event. Mariah Burks, then a senior in theater and the recent winner of the Kennedy Center’s Irene Ryan Acting Scholarship, performed and remembers the event as having plenty of “glitz and glam.” Take away the champagne glasses, she said, and those attended got a good sense of what goes on every day in the university’s studios. As for her BGSU experience, she said: “It was an amusement park. I’m not even going to try to sugarcoat it. As an undergraduate there are moments, trying different stuff, where you’re absolutely terrified and you say ‘I’m not going to do it, I’m not going to go on that ride.’” But other times, she just embraced the challenge. And like that trip to the amusement park, “you have all your friends with you,” Burks said. These friends form a support system, “a family really.” The most notable ovation at the 2015 Bravo! BGSU came in the dollars raised for arts scholarships, $65,000. The president’s office isn’t resting on those laurels, though. This year’s event on April 2 from 7 to 10 p.m. in the Wolfe Center, will add more luster, in the hopes of adding more lucre, to the arts scholarship coffers. Tickets are $100 and are available by calling 419-372-6780 or by emailing lmattia@bgsu.edu. Some attendees at last year’s Bravo! Expressed the view that the arts at Bowling Green State University were “a hidden gem.” The event aims to change that. “This is a great way to showcase the artistic talents of our students and faculty and all that BGSU has to offer in the arts,” according to Mazey. “It will be a wonderful evening for a great cause.” “ “It’s so important for people in the community and perspective donors to see what talent is here at BGSU, and because they see that talent, they want to support that talent,” Mattiace said. Burks, who returns to perform at the invitation of Mazey, knows the value of those scholarships. Burks said scholarships, such as those named for actress Eva Marie Saint, were important. “It’s super helpful that you have that cushion financially,” she said. Having that money meant…


Kantorski-Pope Piano Duo to perform Live in the House show

The Kantorski-Pope Piano Duo will present a Live in the House concert, “Four Hands Dancing: A Program of Music for One Piano Four Hands,” April 2 at 7:30 p.m. in the Pemberville Opera House. Tickets for the show are $12 and are available at Beeker’s General Store, from Carol Bailey at 419-287-4848 and at the door. The Kantorski-Pope Piano Duo was formed in 1988 by pianists Valrie Kantorski and Ann Almond Pope. In 2012, Steinway & Sons awarded the Duo the title of Steinway Ensemble Artists in recognition of its distinguished career in music. The Duo is a three-time winner of First Prize in the Graves Duo-Piano Competition. The two-piano ensemble was awarded the Virginia E. Schrader Residency in the performing arts from the Toledo Museum of Art in conjunction with the national touring exhibition entitled Impressionism. In addition, the duo was selected for membership in the Touring Artists Program of the Ohio Arts Council. Other activities have included performances with the Toledo Symphony Orchestra, appearances on Public Radio and Television, and participation in the New Music and Arts Festival sponsored by the MidAmerican Center for Contemporary Music. The duo can be heard in their recording of the Brahms Hungarian Dances on the Whaling City Sound label. Valrie Kantorski has performed in chamber music groups in the Salzburg Music Festival, at Carnegie Recital Hall and numerous other venues throughout the United States. Ms. Kantorski has been a collaborative recitalist at the International Double Reed Society conferences, the International Saxophone Workshop, the International Double Bass Workshop, and as accompanist for the U.S. finals of the International Chopin Piano Competition. She is the principal keyboardist of the Toledo Symphony, performing as orchestral, chamber, and solo pianist. Ms. Kantorski is a nationally certified teacher of music, and maintains a private piano studio in Toledo, Ohio. Born and raised in Miami, Florida, she soloed with orchestras playing Beethoven and Mozart concerti at the age of 16. She has been on the adjunct music faculties of Adrian College, Florida State University and Florida International University, a member of the Florida Philharmonic, Ft. Lauderdale Symphony, the Greater Miami Opera orchestra, and the South Florida Chamber Ensemble, and has recorded on Whaling City Sound, Coronet, Capstone, and Access labels. Ann Almond Pope resides in Chattanooga, Tennessee where she maintains a private piano studio. She has taught at Bryan College and the University of Tennessee-Chattanooga. Prior to 1998,…


BGSU orchestra takes students on tour of ‘The Planets’

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Students from local schools filled Kobacker Hall on the Bowling Green State University campus Thursday morning. They’d been invited by conductor Emily Freeman Brown to go on a journey through Gustav Holst’s “The Planets.” Given the number of people, a few coughs were inevitable as Brown and the orchestra took them on a musical tour of the solar system and along the way introduced them to the ancient deities who lent their names to the planets. Then came the last movement of the piece, Neptune, the god of mystery. “We’ll have some secret visitors,” Brown told the audience before the movement began. “Listen carefully.” And as the piece neared its conclusion, high, soft voices were softly heard offstage, ghostly, wafting over the orchestra. By the end, only the voices were heard. No violins. No harps. No brass, percussion nor woodwinds. No coughs. Hundreds of children silent as the music faded away. “That response is proof that we’re doing something good,” the conductor said after the performance. Sharing music “is fundamental to human nature.” This was not the first time Brown has led the orchestra in a performance of “The Planets” for a young audience. She did it back in 1992. Those kids would be old enough to have children of their own. How the university has presented young people’s shows has changed over the years. Brown’s first endeavor in 1991 was a trimmed down version of Mozart’s opera “The Magic Flute.” For a number of years, the College of Music presented Saturday morning programs modeled after Leonard Bernstein’s Young People’s Concerts. But attendance at those Saturday morning events had dwindled to the point there were more people on stage than in the audience. In 2014, the university offered a weekday matinee show of “Amahl and the Night Visitors,” the Christmas opera by Gian Carlo Menotti. Now with “The Planets,” the offerings come full circle. “I wanted to give them an experience that’s really different. Something they’d remember,” Brown said. She wants expose them to the idea of attending an orchestra concert. At the beginning Brown had each section of musicians stand up and display their instruments to the students, “so they would have a sense of real people with real instruments.” Brown said she hears all the time from college music students about experiences they had when they were younger that helped fostered their…


Lionface one acts find comedy & drama close to home

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News That coffee shop could be in Bowling Green. That comic convention could be in Columbus. The Lionface Productions one-act plays – all three written for the troupe – have a sense of familiarity viewed through a different lens. The Lionface production of one acts opens tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the rehearsal hall behind the Performing Arts Center in the middle school. The show continues Friday and Saturday. Guests should enter through door M, near the patio area to the south of the Performing Arts Center. Tickets are $7 and $5 for students. Two of the plays were presented at a Wednesday night dress rehearsal. (The third “The Amazing Red Diamond” written by Jesse Koza got an early run through because of a scheduling conflict.) “Every Seven Years or So,” written by J. Benjamin and directed by Christina Hoekstra, traces the arc of the friendship between Eric (Cole Stiriz) and Fiona (Kathryn Gonda) from being artistically inclined and insecure high school students into young adults when the issues that first drew them together still resonate. We meet them mid-conversation as Eric is telling Fiona how his father, the high school art teacher, caught him in flagrante with another boy in the ceramics studio. The story sets up the relationship between Eric and Fiona as friends with no romantic interest. It also helps introduce the character of the father, as a fellow dreamer, who is never seen, but casts a shadow on the action. Stiriz and Gonda have good chemistry as friends so close they know just how to grate on each other. Eric is high-minded, and a snob. Fiona is interested in writing fantasy, which Eric mocks as these “fairy stories” and considers selling out. On a dare they push each other into new artistic territory that influences the way their lives unfold. The play addresses real life issues faced by creative people as they struggle to survive and find their muses. The characters also struggle with their relationship to home, and where that is. Fiona leaves for New York, while Eric becomes an advocate for the local Toledo scene. Benjamin manages to weave these topical concerns into sharp dialogue, and includes a tragic plot twist. Nothing tragic happens in “Pros and Cons” written by Rin Moran and directed by Griffin Coldiron. Here a quartet of roommates head off to a comics convention. They…


Jody Madaras show, ‘All Hands on Deck!’ opens in Branson

Fresh off a three-year national tour, having played to sold-out audiences across the country, The Dutton Family Theater in Branson, Missouri, has announced “The All Hands on Deck! Show” as part of its 2016 lineup. The popular, All-American Roadshow and Radio Broadcast reproduction opened March 17. “The All Hands on Deck!  Show” is an All-Singing, All-Dancing, All-American 1942 Roadshow & Radio Broadcast reproduction filled with the songs, dances and laughs that America has loved for 70 years. Directed and choreographed by Jody Madaras, “The All Hands on Deck! Show” is a fun-filled, true-to-life reproduction of the kind of USO show Bob Hope and Jack Benny would have taken to the troops 65 years ago: classic humor and great music from those special days of road shows, war-bond drives, and radio broadcasts.  Early versions of the show were staged in Perrysburg in 2011 and as part of July 4th celebrations in Bowling Green in 2013. “The All Hands on Deck!Show” boasts over 40 classic Big Band hits in original arrangements including: “Chattanooga Choo-Choo,” “Atchison, Topeka And The Santa Fe,” “I’m In The Mood For Love,” “Pennsylvania Polka,” “I’ll Never Smile Again,” “Any Bonds Today?” “Don’t Fence Me In,” “God Bless America,” “Deep In The Heart Of Texas,” “Thanks For The Memory” and a Military Medley that salutes America and its servicemen and women. “The All Hands on Deck! Show” features Broadway veteran Jody Madaras (creator, Ted Crosley), Valerie Hill (Betty Blake), Rachel Saad (Daisy Maxwell), and Trevor Dorner (John Handley), and the rich sounds of the LIVE 9-piece Hollywood Victory Caravan Orchestra (featuring some of Branson’s finest musicians) , classic commercials, tight harmonies, impromptu skits, and 42 of the greatest American songs ever written. “The All Hands on Deck! Show” offers a musical message for all Americans with a full-circle patriotic salute celebrating the American way of life; reminding us of a time when our country was fully united. “The All Hands on Deck! Show” was born of a heart filled with gratitude and patriotism. Creator and star Jody Madaras wanted to write a show that would say “Thank you” to the greatest generation – the men and women who served our country during WWII and The Korean War – and also remind Americans of a time when our country was truly united. Madaras also wanted to create something to stir the hearts of all Americans, especially the upcoming generation, to…


Small ensembles compete for cash & bragging rights at BGSU

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News With the list of winners in hand Connor Nelson didn’t waste any time making the announcement everyone was waiting for. He’d been in this situation many times before, the flutist said. So he announced the 10th class of winners in The Bowling Green State University College of Musical Arts Chamber Music Competition. Nelson with fellow faculty member Susan Nelson coordinated this year’s event. The event was founded by Douglas Wayland in 2007 to give instrumentalists a chance to hone their skills in a way only having to perform before a panel of judges and having their performances ranked among their peers will do. The event now bears the name of the founder, who died in November, 2013. The Wayland competition is sponsored in his honor by Pro Musica. The competition took its place with the Competitions in Music for concerto soloists and the Conrad Art Song Competition for vocalists and pianists. So this weekend, musicians in ensembles of three to six members competed. Each is coached by a faculty member or graduate student. This year eight undergraduate ensembles with 26 musicians and seven graduate ensembles with 28 musicians competed. The semifinals were held Saturday. For both rounds panels of outside musicians were brought in to judge. Four undergraduates and three graduate finalists were selected to move on to Sunday’s final round where they performed up to 18 minutes of music. The finals got underway with a torrent of saxophone sound from Enohpoxas, that is “saxophone” spelled backwards – the names of the ensembles are often as fanciful as the music played. As in the past contemporary music dominated the repertoire. There was even a heavy sample of rock ‘n’ roll when the undergraduate trio Pitnix performed “Techno-Parade” by Guillaume Connesson. During the piece pianist Varis Vatcharanukul drummed on the strings of the piano with a toothbrush. The trio put on a lively show with flutist Samantha Tartamella swaying like a wood nymph as she played. “Yes we pride ourselves on moving together,” she said after the performance. Pitnix, which also includes clarinetist Stephen Dubetz, won the top undergraduate prize for their efforts. They were the only ensemble other than a saxophone quartet to win. Top graduate prize went to the Gravity Quartet with Kendra Heslip, soprano saxophone, Julie Kuhlman, alto saxophone, Chi Him Chik, tenor saxophone, and Chris Murphy, baritone saxophone. Enohpoxas – Brianna…