Campus

BGSU taps alum Moosbrugger as AD

Bowling Green State University will hire Bob Moosbrugger, a 1994 BGSU graduate, as its new athletic director. The university will hold a news conference today (May 17) to make the formal announcement. Moosbrugger is deputy director of athletics and chief operating officer at San Diego State University where he’s been since 2000. He played baseball at BGSU. He is a graduate of Celina High School. Moosbrugger takes over for Chris Kingston who left the position in April.


Gish Theater, Hanna Hall should be preserved

Professors emeriti Wally and Diane Pretzer argue for preserving Hanna Hall & Gish Film Theater. Is history important? We think that it is. The current BGSU administration, headed by President Mary Ellen Mazey, apparently does not think so. Some of us objected,a few years ago, to the demolition of the unique house on the corner of East Wooster and South College, built from a Montgomery Ward kit, which had served the Department of Popular Culture for a number of years. President Mazey takes great pride in the Health Center now located there; it could have been constructed elsewhere on campus. But, when the current administration dictates, the Board of Trustees falls into submission. Progress is, of course, important; however, when it thoughtlessly pushes history aside, one can become discouraged. What has, we think, become an egregious dismissal of history is the eventual planned demolition of a gem — namely the Gish Film Theater in Hanna Hall. This gem encompasses not only the theater itself (formerly 105 Hanna Hall) but also the accompanying gallery of memorabilia honoring the Gish sisters’ achievements, and the Ralph Wolfe Viewing Center. It is certainly possible that Dean Ray Braun of the College of Business Administration, which is scheduled to take over a remodeled Hanna Hall, could approve of keeping the Gish complex in its current location as a treasure in shared space. It is also possible that the College of Business Administration could happily occupy a building elsewhere on campus, leaving the most traditional BGSU buildings, Hanna, University, and Moseley Halls, retaining their focus on…


Summit brings women in philanthropy into focus

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Learning how to manage money and learning the value of sharing that wealth with others go helping hand in helping hand. For the past 15 years, Auburn University’s Women’s Philanthropy Board has entwined those lessons in programs geared toward elementary school students through adults. Bringing those values together is essential, said Sidney James Nakhjavan, the executive director for the Cary Center for the Advancement of Philanthropy and Nonprofit Studies at Auburn. She was the keynote speaker at the Women in Philanthropy Summit Saturday at Bowling Green State University. The summit was convened by the presidents of BGSU, Otterbein University and the University of Findlay. “When you talk in terms of money management, you talk in terms of one thing,” Nakhjavan told those in attendance. “When you talk in terms of philanthropy and building a legacy, you certainly are talking about one thing. When you blend it then you get this powerful force that really effects change within people. …  It becomes this burning passion.” While teaching money management may seem fairly dispassionate, said Nakhjavan every semester she gets “criers.” One male student became apoplectic in a session talking about money management. He was angry because he didn’t realize how much debt he was taking on. He didn’t know what an IRA or a 401K was. He’s not alone. One young woman told Nakhjavan that when she saw 401K on the syllabus, she thought she was going to have to run a race. Another thought United Way was an airline. “They end up being grateful…


Art community strives to keep painter Bob Mazur’s legacy alive

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bob Mazur’s spirit has returned to Bowling Green State University’s Bryan Gallery. A dozen of his paintings as well as prints of his work are hanging on the walls in preparation for a celebration of his life at noon on Saturday.  Mazur, who taught at BGSU for 33 years before retiring in 1998, died in August, 2015. The paintings are vibrant with splashes of color, especially blue. Mazur dove deep to find them. He snapped underwater photographs that inspired the thick lines and designs of his abstract paintings. He applied thick layers of paint that even years later still seems in motion. They possess a muscularity one would expect from a former wrestler. “You can see his big, bold personality in his paintings,” said Charlie Kanwischer, who started teaching at the university a year before Mazur retired. He was “a guy who liked to have a good time.” Kanwischer said Mazur was always positive and upbeat with friends and students. The exhibit is more than a display of his talents; the show is intended as a continuing effort to continue his legacy. Working with Laura Jajko, president of American Frame, friends, family and colleagues have been working to endow a scholarship in his honor. All 12 paintings and the glicee prints on display, Kanwischer said, are for sale. Those visiting will also be able to order a book of Mazur’s work. Or they can write a check to the BGSU Foundation. “This is about Bob’s legacy and passing it down for generations,” he said….


What’s in a name? Large donations, BGSU hopes

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Still in its early, quiet stages, the current Bowling Green State University Capital Campaign has already met with success. BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey told trustees last week that the campaign has raised $72 million of a $200 million goal. Last year Shea McGrew, the vice president for University Advancement and president and chief executive officer of the BGSU Foundation, described that as a working goal. The campaign was first announced in spring, 2014, and is expected to run for six years. On Friday, the trustees heard what the deans and other top university officials envision as the ways that money would be spent. Not surprisingly the plans offer donors plenty of chances to put their names on something, whether a building, program or professorship. In at least one case, though, a funded position would be named for the current occupant. Sara Bushong, dean of libraries, said one of the capital campaign priorities was to get funding to name a position for Bill Schurk, the sound recording archivist. Schurk begins his 50th year of service in July. Bushong also said that the library would like to have a visiting professorship named after pop culture pioneer Ray Browne, who planted the flag of the then-new discipline at BGSU. Each endowed professorship would cost $300,000. The priorities represent more than a wish list; they offer a look at the direction the university is heading. Health and Human Services Dean Mary Huff stated that the college would look to attracting funding for five named professorships, in several…


Two BGSU football coaching staff cited for assault after bar fight, one put on leave

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Two Bowling Green State University football coaching staff members were cited for assault over the weekend after getting into a bar brawl when they reportedly refused to leave at closing time. As a result, one of the coaches has been placed on administrative leave. Marcus White, 34, from Alabama, and Kenneth Williams II, 23, from Texas, were cited after the staff at Liquid bar, 238 N. Main St., called Bowling Green police for help Sunday at 2:22 a.m. According to BG Police Major Justin White, the report from the incident said Marcus White and Williams were reportedly refusing to leave the bar at closing time, so the bar staff attempted to escort them out. “They became belligerent with bar staff,” Justin White said. Marcus White allegedly punched one employee in the face, breaking his glasses. Williams reportedly punched another employee twice in the face, busting his lip. Marcus White reportedly told police that he felt the bar staff was being aggressive and wasn’t giving him enough time to leave the bar. Neither he nor Williams were taken to jail. Marcus White is the football co-defensive coordinator, and Williams is a graduate assistant football offense coach. Two other members of the BGSU football coaching staff were also present at the incident, but reportedly did not get involved in the fight. Nicholas Young, a football recruiting coordinator, did have a split lip, but said he was unsure how it occurred. Eddie Benavidez, a graduate assistant defense coach, was also present but not involved in…


From suits to nuts, BGSU project puts students’ refuse to good use (updated)

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Harshman Community Room has everything needed to equip a college student, lots of everything needed. Books, planners, printer paper are here. Cardboard crates overflow with boxes of mac and cheese, ramen noodles and Pop Tarts of all varieties. Clothes, from coats to undies, suitable for all occasions from a session in a gym to a special date or a job interview, are piled and hung around the room. Falcon spirit wear gets its own stack. Want to see how you look? There’s about 30 mirrors. Mini-fridges and microwaves are stacked on a table, and a few computers, albeit of questionable operating status, are nearby. Off in one corner is the furniture, and shoes take up an entire room size space. Welcome to the sorting operation for Bowling Green State University’s Move Out, Don’t Throw It Out project. Now in its 15th year, the drive encourages students to donate whatever they don’t want that may be usable to the drive. Boxes are located throughout campus, in dorms, at convenience stores, in the student union. It’s a form of “passive community service,” Hennessy said. The organizers will try to find new homes for their castoff goods. “Somebody’s future treasures,” said Torrance Vaughn, a student volunteer sorting through a bag of clothing. “Somebody will have a use for it.” The idea is to promote reuse and waste reduction, said Nick Hennessy, director of the BGSU Office of Campus Sustainability. On Monday with the students gone, he and Carina Weed, the intern who organized the event, and…


BGSU faculty among Ohio arts award winners

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Three members of the Bowling Green State University faculty have received $5,000 Ohio Excellence Awards from the Ohio Arts Council. The awards are recognition by the artists’ peers for a body of work. Among this year’s recipients are writers Theresa Williams and Lawrence Coates, both of whom teach in the Creative Writing program, and composer Mikel Kuehn, of the College of Musical Arts. Coates, who has received recognition for his novels set in his native northern California, said it was good to receive recognition from Ohio, where he has lived and taught for 15 years. While his novels are most often set in the past and focus on the history of California, his stories often have Ohio locales. One, “Bats,” a piece of flash fiction, won the 2013 Barthelme Award. “People really seem to like the stories I set in Ohio,” he said. He included a few of those in his application. Still “when I write novels I tend to go back to where I feel home is,” he said. “As a teacher as well as a writer I hope to inspire my students to write great fiction set in Ohio,” he said “I hope my students take on that work.” Coates said he plans to use some of the grant to finance the research on forthcoming projects, including a novel set in the years after the Gold Rush. He has to travel to archives to find some of the material he needs. “Not everything is on the internet,” he said. Williams said she…


BGSU grad speakers tell of different paths to success

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Speaking at Commencement ceremonies Saturday morning at Bowling Green State University, ESPN personality Jay Crawford remembered his first college class. It was a speech course that met in South Hall in 1983, and as an exercise the professor asked them to tell the class what they hoped to achieve. The freshman from Sandusky said: “I’m here to be a television sports anchor.” “I had no idea how crazy that sounded, and I’m glad I didn’t,” he told the graduates from the College of Arts and Science. “I heard the chuckles in the back of the room, but I didn’t listen to them.” He cautioned the graduates that for every friend and family member who supports them there will be “many more who will stand between you and what you dream of and what you want the most. Hear those voices but let them fuel you.” So the kid from Sandusky persisted. Armed with a degree in radio, television and film, he went into broadcast. Now the 1987 graduate is at the top of his field as co-host for the midday edition of ESPN’s flagship program “Sports Center.” Crawford has “wildly exceeded the dreams” he had that first day in class at BGSU, he said. Honorary doctoral degree recipient Maribeth Rahe, president and chief executive officer of Fort Washington Investment Advisors, took a less direct route to success. “Career paths are not linear,” she told the graduates. Her mother urged her to go to college to pursue the opportunities denied women of older generations. She…


Step in the right direction: South Hall to be renamed for Falcon Flames Mike and Sara Kuhlin

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Mike Kuhlin learned his lessons from his wife well, and Bowling Green State University is a beneficiary. Kuhlin met his Falcon Flame, Sara, after graduation when both were working for the university. Kuhlin, a 1968 journalism graduate, told the Board of Trustees Friday that he was the kind of guy who ended up with 50 cents in his checking account at the end of the month. “We were kids who were the first in our families who went to college, also kids who didn’t have a clue what our future was going to hold for us.” This guy from Long Island, New York, married the woman from Ohio, in Prout Chapel in 1971. When they bought a house, Sara Kuhlin took a job at a bank and declared they were going to pay off the mortgage as fast as they could. They did, Kuhlin said. “And we were never in debt again.” Sara died in 2013. At a gathering recently Kuhlin was asked to sum up his life’s philosophy in six words: “Living her values as my own.” Doing that is what has enabled the Kuhlins to contribute to their alma mater. Capping that off will be the naming of the new home for the School for Media and Communication the Mike and Sara Kuhlin Center. (“Kuhlin” is pronounced “Coo-Leen.”)  The building had been South Hall. It is in the final stages of a $24 million make over, including the adding of a new production wing. The center will open this fall. BGSU President…


New BGSU labor agreement gets thumbs up

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The new contract between Bowling Green State University and its faculty union prompted a thumbs up from the chair of the board of trustees and a presidential hug. The trustees approved a three-year contract with the BGSU Faculty Association Friday. This is the second contract between the two sides. This one took months to reach as opposed to years in the first collective bargaining agreement. After signing the contract Board Chair David Levey gave the pact two thumbs up as President Mary Ellen Mazey and Faculty Association President David Jackson hugged Speaking to the board, Allen Rogel, who chairs the Faculty Senate, said that “the environment now compared with three years ago is much better.” The faculty union approved the deal with a 95-percent affirmative vote. “I don’t know anywhere anyone gets 95 percent assent,” said Levey. The contract takes effect on July 1. The contract calls for 3-percent pay increases each year. The contract also includes provisions to give greater security for non-tenure track faculty as well as incentives for faculty who bring external grants to the university. The trustees also took two actions related to provisions in the new contract. They made domestic partners ineligible for coverage under university employees’ health plan. Because of the legality of gay marriage, this provision is no longer needed and equalizes coverage between gay and heterosexual employees. Otherwise, the contract calls for no changes in faculty health benefits. Also the board approved a small adjustment in the cost of faculty parking permits, which will rise $5…


College of Education honors Dr. G for her student-centered theater education

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Matt Webb knew of Jo Beth Gonzalez’s teaching mostly through his daughters’ experience in theater at Bowling Green High School. Katie is a high school junior who is in the improv troupe and in one acts, and the other, Liz, is a college junior who danced in the musicals. As students involved in theater they worked closely with Dr. G, who has taught theater at the school for 22 years. Neither girl, their father said, is a star, but both felt the drama teacher had a positive influence on them. His younger daughter told him that Dr. G was always preparing them for life. So when, in his role as the director of student and academic services in the Bowling Green State University College of Education and Human Development, Webb received an email asking for nominations for the college’s Educator of the Year award, he decided to submit her name. First he reached out to Gonzalez and asked for her curriculum vitae.  He learned the details, about the ground-breaking productions, the award-winning shows, two books. “I realized how stellar she is.” This week Gonzalez received the honor given to outstanding alumni and gave the keynote address to about 350 graduates of the college during their Capstone Day activities. As nominee, Gonzalez had to go through an interview process, almost like getting hired for a job. “It was a little nerve wracking,” she said in a recent interview. And she had to respond to a question, she hadn’t prepared for: What is the greatest challenge…


Mary Toth brings It’s On Us message to VP Joe Biden

By ALEX SOLIS/BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS At university and college campuses, sexual assault is a serious problem. It’s On Us, a national movement championing prevention and awareness, has one goal – to stop campus sexual assaults. Senior Mary Toth got involved in the student-led initiative to help improve the culture at BGSU. In fall 2015, she was chosen as one of 17 students nationally to serve on the inaugural It’s On Us Student Advisory Committee, which provides campus student leaders an opportunity to make a larger impact. As her committee term comes to an end, she traveled to the White House to meet Vice President Joe Biden. “It’s On Us has a powerful message. All institutions and individuals must continue to address this issue to make progress,” Toth said. “BGSU is lucky to have such tremendous support from President Mary Ellen Mazey, faculty and staff.” Toth pushes for more opportunities for education, awareness and prevention. Her personal story shows that sexual assault is not just a statistic, but is negatively impacting people across the country. “There is always a need to be more proactive,” Toth said. “Campuses need to create a supportive and safe environment for all.” Given the enormity of this issue, change does not come easy. Toth works with fellow survivors and advocates on a variety of initiatives to combat sexual assault at BGSU and on the national committee. “Students need to stand up. Action produces an equal impact as philanthropy,” she said. In Washington, D.C., Toth met with the other 16 students on the national…


Pianist Cole Burger to perform in Malaysia

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Dr. Cole Burger has gone to Southeast Asia for a few weeks each of the last two years, even traveling to Thailand unknowingly in the midst of a coup-albeit a “very peaceful” one-in 2014. But the trip he will take this May, back to Malaysia for a third time, will be a little different. The instructor of piano in the College of Musical Arts will teach piano and present recitals and master classes at the University of Malaya in Kuala Lumpur as a Fulbright Specialist. Part of the U.S. State Department’s prestigious Fulbright Scholar Program, the specialist program promotes short-term collaborative projects linking American scholars with counterparts at host institutions in more than 140 countries. While he has also been in Cambodia and Indonesia, as well as in Thailand, recently, Malaysia was his desired destination because English is spoken “relatively well” there, plus roads and other infrastructure are better, he said. In addition, about 10 percent of Malaysia’s population is ethnic Chinese and, in a colleague’s words, “it seems like half of the Chinese population wants to be a classical pianist,” Burger related. So, he added, while many Chinese students are studying Western music, the Chinese don’t have the history of teaching it that the U.S. does, offering an opportunity. “We have a chance to share what it means to teach and learn classical piano music,” said Burger, whose international trips to teach and perform have also included one to China, in 2007, and five to Europe. To go abroad, and to welcome…


Community ride promotes need for improvements for bicyclists

  By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Thursday’s community bike ride is more than a pedal to the park. The organizers have some serious points to make about the need to make Bowling Green a better place for bicycling.               The second Community Ride will begin Thursday at 5 p.m. at the fountain in front of the Administration Building on the Bowling Green State University campus.  The riders will head west toward downtown, traveling eventually to Main Street, before reaching their destination, the green space at the corner of Church and West Wooster streets. The first ride came after Lily Murnen, president of the Environmental Service Club, was talking to Rick Busselle, a BGSU faculty member and bicyclist. Busselle was upset by a couple incidents. A student was struck while bicycling near the CVS on East Wooster Street, and then was ticketed for riding on the sidewalk. Busselle himself took a spill while trying to navigate past that spot. His accident occurred in part because he was unsure at what point cyclists were allowed to ride on sidewalks. The city lacks both clarity in the rules governing bicyclists and the bike lanes needed to make riding in the city safer, he said. Yet, the city officials didn’t really seem to think it was a problem. He and Murnen discussed a mass bike riding event. These can involve a large group of bicyclists taking over the streets and, at times, violating traffic laws. Instead they decided that it would be best to have the bicyclists…