Downtown Bowling Green

New music trio Bearthoven rocks to a different beat

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The ClaZel hosted a Music at the Forefront concert Monday night. It might as well have been a rock show. The new music trio Bearthoven vaulted the divide between avant art music and progressive rock. Ditch the expanse of scores on the music stands and the Brooklyn-based trio could perform at a rock festival. Bearthoven – Karl Larson, piano, Pat Swoboda, bass, and Matt Evans, percussion – arrived in Bowling Green (where Larson earned his doctorate) at the tail end of a short Ohio tour. The tour, which included a concert in Columbus, a house concert in Cleveland, and residency at Otterbein College, was to showcase the most recent additions to the trio’s repertoire, three works commissioned by the Johnstone Fund for New Music. Those filled out half the six-piece program. Each set was organized like the side of an LP with a soft, atmospheric soundscape, sandwiched between louder, more rhythmically insistent blasts. Bearthoven’s show opened with Ken Thomson’s aptly titled “Grizzly.” With its antic pulse and reiterated song-of-the-circuitry figures, it evoked a more urban predator. Fjola Evans’ “Shoaling” took listeners to another place altogether. Swoboda’s arco bass summoned the image of a whale rising from an icy sea. The piece opens extremely quietly, builds in tension, and complexity, and volume, then rolls back to near silence. It moves at a near geologic pace. In the end it fades into the silence of the venue’s ventilation and a car whooshing past outside. As if to answer the car’s roar, Charles Wilmoth’s “Silver Eye” opens with a bash, a complaint, even? Evans pounded the driving hard…


Cold cooperates with Winterfest…but vandals send ice sculptures packing to park

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   After an atypical winter of almost balmy temperatures, cold weather will cooperate by returning for this weekend’s annual Winterfest in Bowling Green. But while the chilly temperatures will accommodate winter activities, it appears the downtown is just too hot for the ice sculptures that normally decorate Main Street during the annual event. The decision was made this year for the bulk of the ice carvings to be exhibited in City Park. The change was made due to the cost of protecting the sculptures from vandals who have knocked over the ice art during the night previous years. “Anytime we’ve had them up downtown, we’ve lost one or two,” said Wendy Chambers, head of the city’s Convention and Visitors Bureau. Because of the frequency of the vandalism in the past, the city police have provided extra protection for the carvings. In 2014, the cost for two patrolmen during the nights of the Winterfest was $666, according to Police Chief Tony Hetrick. To avoid that cost, last year the police division put two cruisers in the downtown area, and trained volunteers to secure the sculptures, at no charge. But asking people to watch the carvings during the icy hours of the night proved too much for the volunteers, Chambers said. “It’s tough to get volunteers to stay out in those temperatures all night,” Chambers said. And since the ice sculptures are used as a fundraiser for the BG Skating Club, paying for protection was seen as counterproductive. So instead, this year the carvings will be displayed in City Park. But organizers don’t see the…