Education


Little girl makes waves saving rare dolphins

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Standing on a step stool to reach the podium, the 9-year-old told how she has taken on a nation’s prime minister and a local corporation to try to save dolphins on the other side of the globe. Calista Wilkins, a fourth grader at Otsego, has been working two years to preserve Maui dolphins, the smallest of its species, that live off the coast of New Zealand. On Thursday, Calista shared her story with the Bowling Green Kiwanis Club. The serious little girl with long blond hair is not intimidated by leaders whose words praise the preservation of the dolphins, but whose actions do the opposite. Her efforts have earned her a grant from Jane Goodall’s organization to continue her dolphin-saving work. Calista was also at ease speaking to the group of Kiwanians, trying to engage them in the presentation. She showed slides of New Zealand, where the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy was filmed, and asked if anyone was familiar with the small statured characters called hobbits. “The Maui dolphins are sort of like that,” she said. Though Calista has never been to New Zealand, and has never seen the Maui dolphins, she confidently explained their plight. The rare dolphins number only about 50, and risk becoming extinct by 2030 if nothing changes to reverse their fate. The black, white and gray dolphins have rounded noses, dorsal fins shaped like Mickey Mouse ears, and like to swim in groups close to the shores of the northern portion of New Zealand. Calista showed photographs of the small dolphins, including one called “Scratchy,” named so because of the scars left on his body by fishing nets. Scratchy was lucky, since the fishing nets are responsible for killing many of the Maui dolphins. Since the dolphins live close to the shore, the New Zealand government has declared a safe green zone lining the coast. However, many continue to fish in the protected areas, and the government does nothing to stop them, Calista said. The Maui dolphins aren’t the intended catch, but they often get swept up in the same nets as the fish. And since the dolphins can only remain underwater for 2 ½ minutes without breathing, they perish. “Fishermen gut dolphins so they sink to the bottom, so they don’t get in trouble,” Calista said. From her step stool, the 9-year-old criticized the New…


Gloria Gajewicz honored for home grown science teaching skills

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green teacher Gloria Gajewicz was inspired through her career by her own teachers, and further by her mother’s pursuit of education. So it is fitting that she should receive an award named for the late Neil Pohlmann, an educator and BGSU professor who left his mark on science education. Earlier this month Gajewicz won the first Neil Pohlman Award given by Bowling Green State University at the spring conference of the Northwest Ohio School Boards Association meeting. Patrick Pauken, director of the School of Educational Foundations, Leadership and Policy, said the award “is given in recognition of valuable contribution to Educational Administration and Leadership Studies at BGSU.” Gajewicz is working on her doctorate in the program. The award carries a scholarship. Pauken wrote: “The faculty selected Gloria for the award because of her endless dedication to teaching, learning, and leading in our schools. She is an excellent graduate student, as well, inspiring her classmates with her professional stories of student success. Our classrooms and schools are special places, indeed, with teachers and leaders like Gloria Gajewicz.” Gajewicz has taught science for 20 years, the last 16 at her alma mater, Bowling Green High School where she teaches biology and honors physical science. Finishing her second semester of what she expects will be a four-year process, Gajewicz’s goal is to become a curriculum specialist with her particular interest in science. She said she was inspired to pursue science by the many great science teachers she had in the Bowling Green system. That included Roger Mazzarella, “the wizard of Mazz,” in seventh grade and Bob Rex in eighth. In high school she had Bev Anthony for chemistry and Beth Snook for biology. “I had awesome science teachers all the way through,” she said. And she was pleased that when she started teaching in Bowling Green, Anthony was still on staff so she had “one of my inspirational teachers as a colleague.” “They definitely inspired me to do something in science,” she said. Her inspiration to go into teaching came even closer to home. While she was in high school her mother, Randye Kreischer, went to BGSU to get her education degree. She worked at Woodlane for 25 years. “It was interesting to see her do that,” Gajewicz said. “Having watched her go through that process inspired me to become a teacher.” She got her undergraduate degree at…


BGSU orchestra takes students on tour of ‘The Planets’

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Students from local schools filled Kobacker Hall on the Bowling Green State University campus Thursday morning. They’d been invited by conductor Emily Freeman Brown to go on a journey through Gustav Holst’s “The Planets.” Given the number of people, a few coughs were inevitable as Brown and the orchestra took them on a musical tour of the solar system and along the way introduced them to the ancient deities who lent their names to the planets. Then came the last movement of the piece, Neptune, the god of mystery. “We’ll have some secret visitors,” Brown told the audience before the movement began. “Listen carefully.” And as the piece neared its conclusion, high, soft voices were softly heard offstage, ghostly, wafting over the orchestra. By the end, only the voices were heard. No violins. No harps. No brass, percussion nor woodwinds. No coughs. Hundreds of children silent as the music faded away. “That response is proof that we’re doing something good,” the conductor said after the performance. Sharing music “is fundamental to human nature.” This was not the first time Brown has led the orchestra in a performance of “The Planets” for a young audience. She did it back in 1992. Those kids would be old enough to have children of their own. How the university has presented young people’s shows has changed over the years. Brown’s first endeavor in 1991 was a trimmed down version of Mozart’s opera “The Magic Flute.” For a number of years, the College of Music presented Saturday morning programs modeled after Leonard Bernstein’s Young People’s Concerts. But attendance at those Saturday morning events had dwindled to the point there were more people on stage than in the audience. In 2014, the university offered a weekday matinee show of “Amahl and the Night Visitors,” the Christmas opera by Gian Carlo Menotti. Now with “The Planets,” the offerings come full circle. “I wanted to give them an experience that’s really different. Something they’d remember,” Brown said. She wants expose them to the idea of attending an orchestra concert. At the beginning Brown had each section of musicians stand up and display their instruments to the students, “so they would have a sense of real people with real instruments.” Brown said she hears all the time from college music students about experiences they had when they were younger that helped fostered their…


7 drug canines do sweep during lockdown at BGHS

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green High School went on lockdown Thursday morning as seven drug-sniffing dogs searched the school. At 8:15 a.m., teachers were instructed to put all student book bags in the hallway, according to Superintendent Francis Scruci. The canines then did a drug sweep of all the bags, the lockers, and all the vehicles in the parking lot. The drug sweep inside lasted about 90 minutes. The dogs “hit on” 20 lockers and 20 book bags, but no illegal substances were found. “Nothing was found internally in the school,” Scruci said. The dogs also “hit on” 15 cars in the parking lot, all belonging to students.  Those students were brought out to their vehicles, then school administration and law enforcement searched inside the cars. Marijuana was found in one car. All cars in the lot, including employees’ vehicles, were part of the sweep, the superintendent said. Scruci said no one at the high school knew about the drug sweep until 8 a.m.  – even the administration. The superintendent said the search was not the result of a reported problem, but because he believes it is a good way to promote smart choices for students. “I’ve always done it as a practice,” at the previous school districts where he served as superintendent, Scruci said. “We’re going to continue to try to educate kids on the dangers of drugs,” he said. “We want to make sure they are making the right decisions.” Bowling Green Police Major Justin White said the seven canine units at the school included BG’s dog, along with two dogs from Hancock County Sheriff’s Office, two from Fostoria Police Department, one from Wauseon Police Department and one from Carey Police Department.  


BG schools did not sanction gun raffle…club cancels fundraiser

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Student groups do all kinds of activities to raise funds – sell candy bars, wash cars, sit in dunking booths. But raffling off guns? Not in Bowling Green, says Superintendent Francis Scruci. Scruci sent out an email to district parents late Wednesday afternoon explaining that a raffle was being promoted by the Bowling Green Wrestling Club. The prize was two firearms, with one being an assault rifle, he said. As of Thursday afternoon, the raffle had been canceled. The superintendent explained he did not sanction the raffle and was not aware it was being conducted. He had been alerted by a parent earlier Wednesday. “The Bowling Green City Schools does not promote guns and is not affiliated with this type of raffle,” Scruci wrote in the email. “I can assure you that if the proper procedure had been followed the raffle would have been denied for distribution through the district.” The email continued to say the Bowling Green Wrestling Club is an outside organization raising funds for wrestlers from youth to university age and exists outside of school parameters. “It’s technically not affiliated with the school,” Scruci said when reached Wednesday evening. No flyers were sent out with students, but the high school wrestling coach did send out an email about the raffle to school staff, the superintendent said. “I knew nothing about it,” Scruci said. “They did not submit anything, nor did we distribute it.” But the superintendent decided to be proactive and send out a mass email to parents. “It has nothing to do with us, but I didn’t want parents to see it on Facebook” and think the school endorsed the raffle, he said. “It would have been rejected.” The raffling of firearms, especially an assault rifle just doesn’t make sense, Scruci said. “I and the Bowling Green City Schools are not promoting the raffle of guns as it directly opposes our zero tolerance policy for weapons,” he wrote to parents. On Thursday afternoon, Scruci said he wrestling club intended no malice by sponsoring the raffle. “The wrestling club has done many positive things for the district over the years including helping raise the funds to build the wrestling facility with no district tax dollars,” he said. Scruci also said the club and coaches had decided to cancel the raffle.  


BGSU hears about taking the initiative to keep students engaged

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Vincent Tinto left the best news for the end of his keynote address Monday at Bowling Green State University’s Teaching and Learning Fair. “You don’t need new initiatives,” he told the luncheon crowd in the student union ballroom. “You have enough of them.” And they seem to be working. “I’m very impressed with the directions you’re taking.” Tinto, a professor emeritus from Syracuse University who is considered a leading scholar in how to keep students in college, prefaced this good news with a review of approaches to help students succeed. To anyone paying attention to curriculum developments on campus, much did seem familiar. Supporting students means engaging them in the classroom, giving them a sense of belonging, setting high expectations and then assessing what’s working, Tinto said. He reviewed strategies to do all this. For example, he said, “we hear again and again and again, that students do better in groups than they do on their own.” Tinto continued: “The thing that drives learning in the classroom is active engagement with others in the classroom…. That drives a sense of belonging in the classroom.” That learning can come in many flavors – collaborative, cooperative, problem-based or project-based. All, he said, use the student’s interest in making social connections in order to get them more involved in their learning. Those groups, though, must be structured by the teachers. Letting students select who they work with often leads to one person doing most of the work. The more students work together, the more they will study. “Active engagement with others predicts time on task,” he says. And time on task, studying, predicts academic success. Tinto also noted: “You have service learning to which I say ‘Amen!’ … We’re producing citizens not workers.” While institutions worry how they can retain students – in Ohio state funding depends on it – “students don’t want to retain. Students want to persist and complete even if it means having to transfer. The question you have to ask yourself is how do I act in ways that students want to stay and finish successfully? … How do we drive their motivation, that sense that they can succeed, and that sense of belonging. How do we get students want to learn? “It’s not just teaching, folks,” Tinto said. “It’s constructing a classroom that has expectations, support, assessment, and engagement built into it.” All…


BG schools to hold monthly talks – on drug testing, charter schools and more

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green’s new school superintendent is not shy about communication – and not just Twitter and Facebook – but old-fashioned face to face time. Francis Scruci been hosting regular coffee klatches with citizens, but now he’s looking at narrowing the focus of the discussions and drawing more input. So once a month, Scruci plans to host public workshops. Each will focus on a specific topic, such as drug testing, delivery of instruction, school funding or the impact of charter schools. “I want open and honest dialogue,” he said. The superintendent has asked that all the school board members also attend the workshops. So the gatherings will be like a second meeting a month for the board, but one with more interaction with the public than is possible at regular board meetings. “The community, staff felt disconnected from our board and schools,” Scruci said. Anyone will be allowed to speak at the workshops and no decisions will be made during the meetings. “There will be a climate of collaboration,” he said. “It’s not adversarial.” Scruci presented the idea last week during the first such workshop, this one focusing on the future of school buildings in the district. “We want interaction with our community,” he told the audience. “We want dialogue.” “We have to have the entire village working together for the good of our schools,” Scruci said. The superintendent stressed that anyone wanting to talk to him need not wait until the monthly workshops. In addition to the coffee klatches, he said citizens are welcome to drop by his office at anytime to talk. “We all care about kids. We all care about the community,” he said.        


State testing survey raises questions

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   With school districts across Ohio getting less than stellar grades on their recent state report cards, some further investigation has revealed some disturbing discrepancies, according to Bowling Green Superintendent Francis Scruci. Scruci explained at Tuesday’s school board meeting that a survey about the state tests was conducted with all the district superintendents in Ohio. The superintendents were asked one question – if their district tests were conducted online, on paper, or a combination. A total 450 superintendents responded. Of those, 250 had online tests, with 175 getting an F for the value-added overall grade, and just 47 getting an A. Just 95 districts gave all-paper tests, with 85 of those getting an A. “There is some suspicion in the state that the tests were not equal,” Scruci said. Due to the rash of low scores, there is a possibility of legislative action which would make the most recent scores invalid. However, Scruci said he wasn’t using the discrepancies as a crutch, and he still considers the district responsible for state testing scores. But he also said that a two-hour test should not be used to make a valid assessment of a student. That small “snapshot” is not a true indicator of what the student is learning. Scruci said he is working on a blueprint that will “drill down” to work with each student and take the pressure off teachers when it comes to test scores. “We have to make some changes. We have to do things differently,” he said. Scruci proposed that the district should hire two curriculum coordinators, one at the secondary and one at the elementary level for next year. Ideally, he would also like to hire instructional coaches, but realizes that just is not affordable for the district. Scruci quoted the school treasurer, Rhonda Melchi, as frequently reminding him, “Just because I’m a new superintendent doesn’t mean there’s a new revenue stream.”  


Something to cheer about – BG buys new bleachers

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green fans have something to cheer about – and soon they will have something new to sit on while doing so. The board of education voted Tuesday evening to spend $542,000 for new bleachers in the football stadium. A section of the current bleachers was deemed unsafe last year after serious rusting was discovered. The board voted to spend an extra $14,000 to add slip resistant decking. “I think $14,000 is a very good deal compared to the lawsuit from somebody slipping,” board member Ed Whipple said. The district will use its permanent improvement levy revenue to pay for the new bleachers. However, that levy generates $525,000 a year, so general fund monies will also have to be used for the bleachers. District treasurer Rhonda Melchi cautioned the board that the permanent improvement funds may be needed elsewhere. The $542,000 pays for new bleachers on both the home and visitor sides, handicapped accessible restrooms and pays for the old bleachers to be torn down and taken away. Kent Buehrer, the engineer on the project, said the bid actually came in 11.3 percent below estimate. Also at Tuesday’s board meeting, Kenwood Elementary Principal Kathleen Daney talked about all the “Community Connection” programs at the school. Daney listed such programs as: Students painting city snow plows. One Book BG program, which included the community in the book, “The World According to Humphrey.” Thanksgiving canned food drive. Caroling at Heritage Corner Nursing Home. Dear Santa, a district-wide program adopting 20 families with 55 children during the holidays. Jump Rope for Heart, which raised $18,478 at the elementaries for the American Heart Association. BG winter art festival in the downtown. PTO family dance, which raised supplies for the Cocoon Shelter. Family movie night, at which items were collected for the Wood County Humane Society. Team ERIN Coin Wars, which raised funds for the injured child of a staff member. Red Cross blood drive, which had 139 donors. Daney also talked about the recent effort started by a fifth grade reading group to collect water for residents of Flint, Michigan. Student Troy Amos joined the principal Tuesday to talk about the project. “We all started thinking,” he said, after the class read a book about Flint. “Nobody’s helping them in Bowling Green.” So the students started signup sheets for volunteers to get involved. Daney asked Amos…


BG School District at crossroads … community input sought on building options

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Bowling Green School District is at a crossroads. Though there are twists and turns with each route, the three basic directions lead to renovating, replacing or doing nothing with its school buildings. One of the possible destinations ahead is consolidation of the three elementary schools in one new building. During the first of many meetings expected to stretch over a year or more, Superintendent Francis Scruci explained to a crowd Monday evening that he doesn’t want to take one branch of the road, if local citizens want to go another direction. “The process starts tonight,” Scruci said to the cafeteria full of parents, staff and citizens. “This is one of many conversations and we need to hear from you.” The superintendent tried to summarize the 341-page school building survey received last month from the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission. The survey looked at 23 systems – such as heating, electrical or lighting – at each of the five school buildings and attached renovation and replacement dollars to them. The survey found Conneaut Elementary to have the greatest needs, followed by Kenwood Elementary, the High School, Crim Elementary and then the Middle School. If the cost to renovate a school exceeds 66 percent of the cost to build a new school, then the commission considers it wise to build new, Scruci explained. Conneaut is the only school to exceed that two-thirds threshold, though Kenwood and the high school are close. Though some school districts in the area have received significant financial help from the OFCC program, Bowling Green would not, Scruci said. “We are viewed by the state as a wealthy school district,” he said, which was met by laughter from the crowd. The 118-square-mile district is mostly farmland which saw an increase in valuation, plus the district’s population includes “phantom” numbers of transient college students. Those two factors mean Bowling Green would get just 14 cents for every $1 spent on new construction. Working with state money also comes with state strings, Scruci said, and those strings sometimes don’t allow districts to build as they wish. No state funding was used to build the Middle School, which meant the district could build larger classrooms to accommodate its needs, board member Ellen Scholl pointed out. So the question then is – how much is the community willing to support? A new high school was…


Study shows fewer teens smoking, drinking…but other troubling trends emerging

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Fewer Wood County teens are drinking alcohol and smoking marijuana or cigarettes. And fewer are taking swiped narcotic painkiller prescriptions. But other troubling trends are emerging. Like Wood County teens’ rate for narcotic use that is still higher than the nation’s, more teens turning to electronic cigarettes and more reporting suicidal thoughts. Bill Ivoska reported the results of the annual youth surveys of more than 8,000 local students this morning. With the support of the Wood County Educational Service Center and the Wood County Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services Board, Ivoska has been conducting the annual surveys in all the county school districts since 2004. “The rates of substance abuse in Wood County were higher than they were in the nation,” when he started 12 years ago, Ivoska said. But since then, the surveys have shown a steady drop in drug and alcohol use among teens – faster than the decline seen nationally. “We have had tremendous improvements in the reduction of substance abuse among adolescents,” Ivoska said. The drop in the use of cigarettes, marijuana, alcohol and binge drinking have been drastic, he said. “We are declining in all the major substances.” When the surveys started in 2004, 70 percent of seniors reported using alcohol. That number is down to 45 percent. In that same period, cigarette use went from 27 percent to 6 percent, and marijuana use went from 36 percent to 22 percent. Ivoska credited the decreases in risky behaviors to the number of prevention and education programs in local schools and communities. Many of those programs were made possible by grants secured based on the surveys’ findings. “When I would report this in Lucas County, nobody did anything. They stuck it on the wall,” Ivoska said. But when officials in Wood County started the surveys and saw the results, they went to work to solve the problems, he said. Despite the positive numbers for many risky teen behaviors, Ivoska cautioned officials to keep an eye on some newer trends like e-cigs, marijuana in edibles and gambling. “Some substitutes might be emerging,” he said. “While cigarette use is down, electronic cigarettes have hit the scene,” with 15 percent of seniors reporting use of e-cigs, he said. Students are also reporting using marijuana in e-cigs and edibles. “One out of 10 males are having brownies” with weed, he…


BG High welcomes area bands for adjudicated event this weekend

About 1,800 musicians from around Northwest Ohio will gather Friday and Saturday at Bowling Green High School to test their mettle in the Ohio Music Education Association’s band contest. So in addition to making sure they’re all tuned up and ready to perform their best, band director Bruce Corrigan, colleague Jeremy Sison and their charges as well as their parents, will also be on duty playing host to their counterparts from 34 bands in a six county area. It’s a big job, Corrigan said. Each band has to have a home room assigned. And then six spaces have to be set up to accommodate full bands – two rooms for warm up, two rooms for sight reading, and two spaces for performance. All those spaces must be fitted out with music stands, percussion instruments, and chairs. The high school borrowed music stands and percussion equipment from the Bowling Green State University College of Musical Arts, which is conveniently on break this week. Corrigan said other area band directors offered to help, but he said he didn’t want to inconvenience them when they were preparing for the event. The host band, Corrigan said, is responsible for handling all the paperwork involving the bands and adjudicators. Arrangements for hotel rooms for those judges must also be made. And then there’s all that traffic to direct. All this and more takes an army of volunteers, both adults and students. It’s been about 25 years, he said, since Bowling Green has hosted the Large Ensemble Adjudicated Event. For most of that time, Sylvania Southview has been the host. Corrigan said the school’s new Performing Arts Center prompted his decision to open Bowling Green’s doors up to the bands. “We have this wonderful facility, this beautiful performing arts stage. … It screamed, ‘let’s host this!’” He noted that the acoustical design for the Performing Arts Center was done by the company that did the work on Carnegie Hall. The event will get underway on that stage Friday at 4:30 p.m. when the Concert Band, conducted by Sison, will perform. The second performance stage will be set up in the high school gym. The Rossford band will open up that stage at 4:30 p.m. Friday performances go late into the night with the final bands taking the stage after 10 p.m. Corrigan will conduct the BG Symphonic Band on the PAC stage at 8:30 a.m. Saturday….


First-year programs aim to turn high school students into college scholars

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University has been holding onto more students in recent years. Keeping students once they are recruited is as important as recruiting them in the first place. That boost in retention – making sure students who come in as freshman end up leaving as BGSU graduates – is crucial to the university’s financial health. The state funding formula demands it. That increased retention is no accident, Provost Rodney Rogers told faculty senate this week. Much of the credit goes to the first-year initiatives designed to integrate new students into the BGSU academic culture from their earliest days on campus. When Vice Provost for Academic Affairs John Fischer took his turn at the podium to spell out those programs, he said he wished he had the scroll used at this year’s Oscar ceremonies where the names of agents, publicists, hairdressers, and moms that the stars wanted to thank ran at the bottom of the screen. The programs designed to keep freshmen around for the spring semester and beyond are built on a foundation of collaboration with the faculty. Some colleges and universities are opting to take a more economic look at education, for example, by having students take more online courses, Fischer said. BGSU, however, “has put its flag in the sand that we’re going to put the quality of the experience ahead” of those other considerations. “That’s what we are going to measure and count and pay attention to and argue about.” That seems to be working. Students, for example, who take linked courses are more likely to continue at BGSU. Linked courses are one of several approaches the university takes. The program enrolls groups of students in the same course sections. That way they see familiar faces in a couple of their classes. Having students take the same two course sections also has the collateral effect of students sometimes ending up together in other classes since it narrows the other scheduling possibilities. Fischer said faculty see this working when students arrive at class buzzing with talk about another course. Giving students more opportunities to talk to fellow students and a chance to communicate with faculty are key goals of the first-year programs. When the linked courses are offered for the third year next fall, he said, the goal is to have more communication between those teaching the courses, so they can…


Learning Goes Both Ways in Partnership Between BGSU and Toledo School for the Arts

By LINDSAY LAURENT/BGSU Marketing & Communications The College of Education and Human Development is known for producing some of the top teacher-candidates in the state. Through programs like the teacher match program and Capstone Day, BGSU continues to stay ahead in the field of middle childhood to adolescent to young adult childhood education. Added to its programming this year is a new, inclusive learning experience for students at Toledo School for the Arts (TSA). “Our partnership with TSA is rich and unique,” said Dr. Tim Murnen, director of the School of Teaching and Learning at BGSU. “Like any other state school, TSA is focused on state standards and takes these standards very seriously. But their method of teaching is very integrated and creative. Administrators and teachers work together to integrate the arts into everything they teach.” According to Murnen, the BGSU/TSA partnership is important because it is a learning experience that adds value to both institutions. Students going to TSA learn and actively participate in classrooms with their mentor teachers, adding value to that classroom. In turn, BGSU students are able to go into the classrooms and learn by doing, not just observing. TSA is completely open to this approach, and the BGSU students are put to work, thus maximizing the value our students can add to the classrooms. The TSA teaching and learning experience is just one of the reasons this collaboration is important for the students. Teacher education students going to TSA go in their freshman and sophomore year, which is new to the middle childhood and adolescence to young adult programs. Traditionally, students have only observed in classrooms until the professional phase of their careers, which isn’t until their third or fourth year. By listening to students and discussing with faculty, the School of Teaching and Learning decided they needed to get students more active classroom experience before their professional phase. “This partnership has been an evolution in the works for almost a decade,” said Nick Mariano, TSA principal. “What I love about this program is the timing is so upfront and new into the professional experience. It is crucial for students to recognize and identify that teaching is what they are suited for, and know what it is like to be on the other side of the desk.” BGSU students go to TSA on the same day each week in order to experience what it is…