Health

Inmate opiate addicts given lifeline before leaving jail

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Doug Cubberley remembers the day a man came to the court probation office begging to go to jail. “We had one young man come to our office who said, ‘If I don’t go to jail, I’m going to die.’” The man was addicted to opiates and knew it was only a matter of time till he overdosed, Cubberley said Thursday. Probation workers in Wood County began noticing in 2014 that something was killing their clients. “They were dying at alarming rates,” said Cubberley, chief probation officer and court administrator at Bowling Green Municipal Court. So the conversation started about opiates and their growing grasp on people of all ages and backgrounds. “We all wanted to think it was only in Cleveland or Toledo,” he said. But it was clearly here, too. So leaders in the police, court and drug treatment professions started looking for a solution. Community meetings on the opiate epidemic were held in Bowling Green, Perrysburg and North Baltimore. Last week, another meeting was held for court, probation, police, EMS and drug treatment professionals. This time it was to introduce “a necessary evil” in response to the opiate epidemic – Project Direct Link. Statistics show the highest rate of accidental overdose occurs when an addict leaves jail or a treatment program, Cubberley said. “Once they are in jail, they lose tolerance to opiates.” And that often leads to deadly results. So Project Direct Link is intended to offer opiate addicts a different course. The program gives inmates an injection of Vivitrol, a drug that helps prevent cravings and doesn’t allow them to feel the positive effects of opiates. “People cannot get high,” said Julie Weinandy, of Renewed Mind, which has been working with a Vivitrol program in Lucas County. The injection lasts 28 days, which gives the person a “safety net” until they are linked up with treatment programs. “It’s an awesome tool for the clients,” Weinandy said. Inmates are the perfect clients, since Vivitrol can only be used when a person’s body is clean of opiates. Jail is the ideal “detox program,” she said. “It’s very difficult to get a client to detox at home.” The program doesn’t stop with the injection of Vivitrol.  The next steps require the client to: Report to the…


Health goals set for county – now comes tricky part

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Health experts from across the county have set four top goals for improving local residents’ health. They want us to shed some weight, get help for mental health issues, stop bullying and get access to health care. Now, comes the tricky part. To accomplish those goals, a list of steps has been set up for area agencies. On Friday, the Wood County Health Partners were shown how they can keep track of their progress. Connor Rittwage, an epidemiologist with Wood County Health District, explained the electronic “dashboard” program that will allow each health agency to record which goals they had accomplished. The charting will hold agencies accountable for their efforts. “You can pull up the dashboard and see how everybody is doing,” Wood County Health Commissioner Ben Batey said. “I think this is the key to moving this forward.” The progress can be monitored by the agencies involved – and by the public. “Now the public is going to be able to see it,” Batey said. In the past, community health goals have been set, detailed reports written, then the reports often languished on agency bookshelves. “We want to make sure this plan doesn’t just sit on a shelf,” Batey said. The frequent updates to the plan will also allow the health partners to examine strategies that are successful and those that are not. “You don’t want to keep doing things that aren’t working,” Batey said. The health partnering agencies will continue meeting quarterly, since face-to-face conversations will also help the plan succeed, Batey said. “We want healthy, happy residents,” he said. Following is a list of the goals set in the Wood County Community Health Improvement Plan: Decrease adult, youth, and child obesity with the following steps: – Promote breastfeeding in new mothers – Implement OHA Healthy Hospitals Initiative – Expand wellness programming such as the “Walk With A Doc” program – Expand efforts of the Wood County Obesity Task Force – Increase nutrition/physical education materials being offered to patients by primary care providers – Create a wellness outreach campaign Increase mental health services among adults and youth by doing the following: – Increase the number of primary care offices who screen for depression during office visits – Provide Mental Health First Aid Training for adults…


Health district offers heart disease and stroke screening

Wood County residents ages 27 to 64 are eligible for free health screenings for heart disease and stroke risk. The screenings include cholesterol, glucose, blood pressure and BMI. Appointments are required. Currently two screenings are scheduled for next week. Future events will be scheduled in Weston and Stony Ridge. The current event schedule is: Bowling Green – Tuesday, Aug. 9 from 8 a.m. to noon at the First United Methodist Church (1526 E. Wooster St.) Bradner – Thursday, Aug. 11 from 8 a.m. to noon at the Bradner American Legion (209 W. Crocker St.) North Baltimore – Thursday, Sept. 1 from 8 a.m. to noon at the North Baltimore Library (230 N. Main St.) To schedule an appointment, call 419-352-8402 ext. 3258. Fasting for 8-10 hours before an appointment is recommended for more accurate results. Registered Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) volunteers are also wanted to help with these events. If you are or want to become an MRC volunteer, contact William Bryant-Bey at 419-528-8402 ext. 3267 or wbryant-bey@co.wood.oh.us to learn more. The events are funded by a grant from the National Association of City and County Health Officers to support Medical Reserve Corps activities. Three events have already had to be rescheduled due to no or low numbers of appointments. Why screen for heart disease and stroke risk factors? Heart disease and stroke accounted for 26% of all Wood County adult deaths in 2013. Some heart disease and stroke risk factors can be changed, treated or controlled. These include blood pressure, diabetes, blood cholesterol, smoking and obesity. The 2015 Wood County Health Assessment found that more than 1 in 4 people (26 percent) of Wood County adults had been diagnosed with high blood pressure, 30 percent had high blood cholesterol, 22 percent were obese, and 11 percent were smokers, four known risk factors for heart disease and stroke. The Medical Reserve Corps is a national network of volunteers, organized locally to improve the health and safety of their communities. In Wood County, all types of volunteers are accepted including medical and non-medical individuals. During times of crisis, volunteers will be needed to help give medication or care for large number of injured or ill. Becoming an MRC volunteer requires completing online training and registration through an Ohio volunteer database. Wood County Health District encourages people…


Hospital offers Eating for Good Health class

(Submitted by Wood County Hospital) Wood County Hospital offers the Eating for Good Health class to county employees and community members. This six week class is led by a registered dietitian and teaches the tools necessary to develop a healthy, workday eating plan. The class focuses on planning, purchasing and preparing quick nutritious meal and snacks. Attendees will also learn tips on seasonal eating. These easy changes can lead to a healthier heart, weight and digestive system. Third quarter classes will be held Tuesday mornings, Aug. 16 -Sept. 20 from 7:30-8 a.m. at the County Office Building. Preregistration is required and can be done by calling Jane Graffin, Nutrition Services, at 419-354-8866. The deadline to register is Aug. 12. A minimum of eight participants is necessary to conduct the class and there is a limit of 20 spots. The cost is $48 for the six series class and county employees are eligible for reimbursement through the Nutrition for Life Program upon the completion of the series. For questions or more information call 419-354-8866 or visit www.woodcountyhospital.org


Optimal Aging panel gets personal about facing challenges

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Optimal Aging Community Fair was all about getting older while remaining healthy in body and mind. Monday’s fair was the first major public event for Bowling Green State University’s newly launched Optimal Aging Institute. For luncheon speakers the event, the Wood County Committee on Aging put together of panel of local residents who have faced the kind of challenges people encounter as they age. Denise Niese, executive director of the committee, said it was not hard to single out those selected. Nancy Wright, Tim Tegge and Dr. Richard Barker are all well known in the community and have bounced back from challenges that would set others back on their heels. A video of Nora Liu, a retired university women’s basketball coach, was also shown.  Though in assisted living herself, she continues to lead exercise classes. Wright, of Grand Rapids, helped her husband run a funeral home and is a very active community volunteer. Her moment of truth came on Feb. 11, 1993, when she wasn’t feeling well and had her husband bring her to the emergency room at Wood County Hospital. There the emergency room doctor missed the signs of a heart attack because no one expects a 50-year-old woman to have a heart attack. The error was caught. She received the proper treatment. Wright not only lived to tell about it, but to preach about her experience, especially to women who may mistakenly think they are not at risk of a heart attack. Wright said that she learned that after menopause women’s risk of heart attack is the same as men’s. She also has a family history of heart disease. It killed her father, and all four of her brothers have heart problems. Tegge, who was born in 1964, was, in his words, “the rookie” on the panel.  He’s been dealing since he was a child with a condition many experience late in life. He had a form of early onset macular degeneration, “which means I have a lot of blind spots.” Maybe one of the biggest, he said, was that he was at the age that he’d be asked to be on the panel. Tegge related how he felt after being laid off that he’d found the perfect job as the executive director of the Wood…


August is National Breastfeeding Awareness Month

Submitted by Wood County Health District This month, breastfeeding advocates will combine efforts in the promotion, protection and support of breastfeeding in the United States. August 1 – 7 has been designated as World Breastfeeding Week. The 2016 theme is about how breastfeeding is a major factor in getting us to think about how to value our well-being from the start of life, how to respect each other and care for the world we share. WIC Promotes, Protects and Supports Breastfeeding  One of the major goals for the WIC program is to improve the nutritional status of infants. As a result, WIC health professionals encourage WIC mothers to breastfeed their infants. Below are a few reasons why we believe that breastmilk is the optimal food for your baby. Breastmilk is good food for your baby. Breastmilk has a significantly positive impact on immune function, digestion, and brain development to mention just a few benefits. The World Health Organization calls mother’s early milk or colostrum “baby’s first immunization” because of the many immune factors it contains. These factors or antibodies provide protection from infection and illness. They are particularly important during baby’s first weeks outside of its mother’s protective womb when vulnerability to infection and diseases is high. Breastfeeding Protects: mom, baby and Earth  This year’s Breastfeeding Awareness Month theme in Ohio is Breastfeeding Protects:  mom, baby and Earth. We know breastfeeding protects baby’s health, but what about Mom? According to research, mothers who breastfeed are less likely to experience breast/ovarian cancers, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease to list a few. Also, nursing moms are less likely to experience postpartum depression due to powerful and “feel good” hormones released during lactation. Additionally, breastfeeding is the most natural and ecological way to feed a baby. Feeding a baby at the breast requires just two things – mom and baby’s bodies. It’s totally plastic free and no products are needed! This automatically reduces waste from production to feeding, not to mention the huge monetary savings that are realized. When you consider the pollution and waste materials generated by formula manufacturing and packaging, feeding breastmilk either directly from breast, or bottle produces far less waste and uses minimal natural resources. In view of the lifesaving, monetary and ecological benefits of breastfeeding, we encourage everyone in our community to…


BGSU learning community will be gathering health & fitness data on the go

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Freshmen in Bowling Green State University’s brand new Health, Wellness and You Learning Community will be starting out on the right foot — and hand. They will be wearing FitBit® wristband activity trackers as “researchers on their own lives,” according to founding director Dr. Mary-Jon Ludy, public and allied health. “This is a great opportunity for students to get engaged in research using a technology and topic they can understand.” While the students are learning about diet, fitness, work-life-school balance and related wellness topics in their cohort classes, they will also be gathering data that will be used in Ludy’s long-term Freshman Health Study and by senior nutrition majors for their research course projects. What is learned could guide programming to make the BGSU campus healthier for current and future students. Planned as an academic learning community this year, the goal is for Health, Wellness and You to become a residential community in the 2017-18 school year, Ludy said. Aimed primarily at freshmen in academic majors that do not include an introductory class, the learning community kicks off with freshman 1910 classes taught by faculty members in a variety of disciplines. Each class is capped at 20 students. Following their weekly 1910 class sessions, all participants will meet together for a wellness-related seminar. The learning community’s 1910 curriculum builds on courses that have been offered in the past, with some new ones this year, said Kim Brooks, associate director for undergraduate education. “One of the goals is to build a relationship between students and faculty members that will help them become acclimated and make a successful transition to university life,” she said. There is strong evidence that participation in an academic learning community contributes to student retention, Ludy said. Also, undergraduate engagement in research activities promotes future research involvement — all of which strengthen engagement and hands-on learning. Robyn Miller, human movement, sport and leisure studies, two years ago piloted a fitness-related course that proved popular. She and Karyn Smith, health educator with the Wellness Connection, are offering two sections of “Live Well, Learn Well” this year. Both are fully enrolled. “MythBusters: Falcon Edition,” taught by Ludy and Dr. Amy Morgan, exercise science and associate dean in the College of Education and Human Development, explores assumptions about college…


Hospital hosting Baby & Toddler Fair

From WOOD COUNTY HOSPITAL Area mothers and expectant mothers are invited to take part in a free Baby & Toddler Fair  Tuesday, Aug. 2, 6 to 8 p.m. in the hospital meeting rooms. The event is being hosted in conjunction with World Breastfeeding week to celebrate mothers and children and to bring attention and awareness to the benefits of breastfeeding. Mothers are encouraged to bring their babies or toddlers to the event. There will be diaper decorating contests, giveaways, safety education, baby wearing, car seat checks and more. There will be an assortment of booth set up with information about many baby related topics. The give always will include breastfeeding supplies, baby care items, Earth Momma Angel Baby supplies, a pack n play, breast pumps, a baby quilt and more. The hospital hosts monthly support group meetings for expectant or nursing mom’s and their infants. The meetings are held on the first Tuesday of each month in the meeting rooms at the hospital. No registration necessary. Join Wood Cty Mother’s Circle on Facebook for more information and to be a part of the group. For more information on dates and times of the breastfeeding support group, visit http://www.WoodCountyHospital.org and select “classes and programs” or call 419-354-8900.


‘Paramedic One-Pager’ recommended for refrigerators

(Submitted by Steve Long) In late June my mom and I ventured up to northern Ontario. The trip was wonderful in many ways, especially as a reminder of the importance of gathering with family and friends. As VISA Card advertisements point out, what price tag can be placed on the value of dining with 33 Canadian kin? starting a wonderful night of Hootenanny music by singing national anthems of 7 countries represented by the participants? “having a coffee” with Canadian friends (the kids now know this is code word for spending several hours talking)? sharing time with family boating and fishing pristine waters in Algonquin Provincial Park (roughly two-thirds the size of Yellowstone)?  PRICELESS. My hope and prayer is that each of you readers will be able to experience and appreciate one or more similar activities this summer. Each act of making, capturing, organizing and sharing such memories allows for a genuine feeling and/or expression of gratitude in our lives. An extra bonus on this trip came totally by surprise. While staying with Canadian cousins, I spied on their refrigerator a “Paramedic Information” card provided by their county EMS service. With their permission I took a look and was startled with how similar much of this was with Binder of a Lifetime thinking. Their “Paramedic Information” one page document contains information all in one place that would be ever-so-helpful should a health care emergency ever occur. Enhanced with key Binder of a Lifetime information, the Long Memories “Paramedic One-Pager” can now be found as a link here: www.BinderOfALifetime.com. Please check it out if you’re interested, and consider printing and filling out a copy(ies) for your family and other loved ones (NOTE: plans are to check with the Bowling Green Fire Department and BG Senior Center to see if this is something we might promote to the community at-large.) It’s never too early to give ourselves the bonus of preparation in such matters. As we continue through summer and the extra minutes of sunshine that it affords, may we can give ourselves the bonuses of extra time with family and friends, plus preparedness in case of unforeseen health emergencies. Enjoy the day…and the memories! Steve Long, former BG resident and now living in Cincinnati, is an “aspiring memory missionary.” He and wife Kim are having fun…


Health center doesn’t turn any patients away

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Navigating health care systems can be a scary process, especially for those people who lack adequate insurance. But local residents who have put off medical care for fear of another bill they can’t afford will not be turned away at the Wood County Community Health and Wellness Center. “We are looking at the whole person” and that includes offering services on a sliding fee scale so they are affordable to all, said Diane Krill, director of the center located inside the Wood County Health District at 1840 E. Gypsy Lane Road, Bowling Green. “No one is turned away for services,” Krill said. The health and wellness center provides primary care for all ages, with Dr. Steve Dood as chief medical officer and Katie Barricklow as family nurse practitioner. “It’s care for infants through everyone,” Krill said. The center offers STD testing, women’s health care, senior health care, behavior health services and social work services. An in-house pharmacy allows patients to get their prescriptions filled on site. “They can get all of their needs met,” Krill said. The center is a lifesaver for many patients who have put off dealing with health issues, said Rhonda Stoner, social worker at the site. “They’ve let their health go for so long, by the time they come to us there are a lot of health needs,” Stoner said of some patients. “We see the smiles on their faces now. Before they thought there was no hope,” she said. “We see the healing in that old wound.” The center focuses on treating the entire person, Krill explained. So in addition to tending to physical needs, the center also has a behavior health specialist to help with mental health needs such as anxiety, depression and everyday life struggles. “Evidence shows that physical and mental needs are really integrated,” Krill said. “We do feel behavioral medicine is important.” The services are “patient-centered,” and based on community health assessments of local needs. With its expanded services, the health and wellness center has seen an increase in patients. Last year, the center saw more than 1,000 patients, and so far this year 344 new patients have come in for care. “We’re always accepting new patients,” Krill said. And anyone is welcome – people with high co-pays,…


Water study searches for non-Toledo options

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   The suspect quality and high price of Toledo water has prompted Wood County to search for other sources of water for its customers now dependent on Toledo. A study paid for by the economic development commission identified three alternate sources of water for Wood County users. The three primary scenarios identified in the study, which was released Friday, were: City of Bowling Green’s water system with expanded reservoir space. Maumee River regional water plant with an intake and reservoir. Maumee River/Lake Erie Bayshore water intake, with a regional water plant and reservoir. Wood County customers have long questioned the price of Toledo water, but also began to doubt the quality after the water crisis in the summer of 2014, when people were warned to not drink water from Toledo due to the algal blooms. So a study was conducted to look at other options. “The Wood County Economic Development Commission believes the national attention on the water crisis brought into question the potential impacts on future economic development attraction and retention effects for Wood County,” a release on the study results stated. The cost of Toledo’s water to users outside the city limits also prompted the study. “There’s a big upcharge for the suburbs,” said Wade Gottschalk, executive director for the Wood County Economic Development Commission. “We asked, are there other alternatives that are economically feasible?” “The answer is – yes,” Gottschalk said. The options would relieve Wood County customers’ dependency on Toledo water, said Jerry Greiner, executive director of the Northwestern Water and Sewer District. The contract between many Wood County users and Toledo for water expires in 2024. So this study gives time for action to be taken to create other sources. “A water plant might take five or six years to get up and running,” Gottschalk said. “Ideally, we’d like to see some sort of regional water agreement.” The current Wood County usage from Toledo is approximately 5.5 – 6.8 million gallons per day with projected maximum usage to increase to 12.3 – 14.25 million gallons per day. To meet these demands, a 10 to 20 million gallons per day water treatment facility is required. The Wood County study considers the capital costs, operational costs and probable rates for the three options identified. The…


Wood County Hospital is Named 2016 Most Wired

Submitted by Wood County Hospital Technology is improving the efficiency of care delivery and creating a new dynamic in patient interactions, according to results of the 18 th Annual Health Care’s Most Wired survey, released by the American Hospital Association’s (AHA) Health Forum. According to the survey, Most Wired hospitals are using telehealth to fill gaps in care; provide services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week; and expand access to medical specialists. This year’s results show: – The top three telehealth services offered in hospitals are consultations and office visits, stroke care, and psychiatric examinations and psychotherapy. – Stroke care is the most rapid growth area for telehealth services up 38 percent from 2015, as evidence-based studies emphasize the time urgency of stroke care. – More than 25 percent of hospitals use internet-enabled monitoring devices for chronic disease management of congestive heart failure, diabetes and heart disease. “To receive this level of recognition again is a culmination of efforts of our IT Team, and so many other members of our organization who devote time, talent and energy into operating, maintaining and enhancing all of the information systems solutions used within our hospital and our physician practices,” said Stan Korducki, president of Wood County Hospital. “We take justifiable pride in the ongoing efforts it takes to achieve this recognition.” In redefining the way that they provide care in their communities, Most Wired hospitals are using technology to build patient engagement with the individual’s lifestyle in mind, which includes electronic access to their care team. – 68 percent accept patient-generated data through the patient portal. – 26 percent of Most Wired organizations offer E-visits through a mobile application. – 61 percent use social media to provide support groups. “Hospitals are breaking-out of their traditional four walls and providing care where and when patients need it,” said Rick Pollack, president and CEO of the AHA. “These Most Wired hospitals exemplify this transformation by harnessing technology, engaging patients and offering services remotely. And, removing policy and other barriers to telehealth will allow even faster adoption of these amazing technologies.” Most Wired hospitals are utilizing population health management tools and partnering with other health care providers to share critical clinical information used in analyzing interventions aimed at key patient groups, such as those with diabetes. To get patients…


Public bugged by Zika invited to program tonight

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   More than 20 Ohioans have been diagnosed with Zika Virus this year. But local residents need not worry about mosquitoes in their backyards or area parks spreading the virus. Local residents with concerns about Zika are invited to a presentation tonight at 7, in the Simpson Building, 1291 Conneaut Ave., Bowling Green. The program will be hosted by the Bowling Green Parks and Recreation Department, and presented by Wood County Health District epidemiologist Connor Rittwage and health educator Jennifer Campos. “It’s for anybody curious about it,” Rittwage said. “We’ll take as many questions as we can.” But Zika Virus is nothing for local residents to be stressed about, he added. “Our level of worry has not changed too much. It’s something to definitely watch. But the chances of it developing in Wood County are very low.” Zika is primarily transmitted by mosquitoes, and has spread through much of the Caribbean, Central America and South America. So far, there have been no reported cases of Zika virus transmitted by mosquito bites in the U.S. In fact, there is no evidence anywhere in the continental U.S. of the type of mosquitoes known to transmit Zika, Rittwage said. However, 934 cases have been reported in travelers returning to the U.S. from Zika affected countries – including 22 cases in Ohio. And 13 cases have been reported to have been sexually transmitted in the U.S., with one in Ohio. “Travel is still a huge component,” Rittwage said. Before traveling to another country, Rittwage advised checking with the Centers for Disease Control map. “It’s always important to check if there are any advisories.” The Centers for Disease Control has determined the Zika Virus is much more concerning than initially believed. It is the first time a mosquito bite can cause serious brain injuries to babies, including microcephaly, a birth defect which causes the infant’s head to be small and the brain to not develop properly. So far in the U.S., seven infants have been born with defects associated with Zika. “If you’re going to travel to one of these countries and you can’t postpone it,” Rittwage suggested the following precautions: Wearing long-sleeved shirts and long pants. Staying in places with air conditioning or that use window and door screens to keep mosquitoes…


Dr. Arie Eisenman from Galilee Medical Center to speak

From JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER TOLEDO The Jewish Federation of Greater Toledo will present two free lectures by Dr. Arie Eisenman of the Galilee Medical Center. He will speak Thursday, July 14, at 7 p.m. in the University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, Collier Building Room 1000a and Sunday, July 17 at 4 p.m. at Congregation B’nai Israel, 6525 Sylvania Ave., Sylvania. Dr. Arie Eisenman is head of internal medicine within the Emergency Department at the Galilee Medical Center in Nahariya, Israel and chairman of the Partnership2Gether Medical Task Force at the Jewish Agency. The Galilee Medical Center, located only 6 miles from the Lebanese border, is the closest hospital to any border in Israel and has a long history of being prepared for mass casualty events. GMC was the first hospital in Israel to build an underground hospital enabling it to provide continuous safe and secure care to patients in the event of warfare. It is now the model for medical institutions nationwide. The GMC has provided medical care for more than 1,000 Syrian casualties over the last three plus years, twenty-five percent of whom were women and children under the age of eighteen. It has been the case that every night, two or three severe multi-trauma Syrians arrive at the GMC for lifesaving care. The Galilee Medical Center is the second largest hospital in the north of Israel with 69 departments, specialty units and 700 registered beds above ground and, in case of need, 450 underground. The GMC is located on the frontline of the Israeli-Lebanese border and serves a demographically mixed population of Jews, Muslims, Christians, Druze and Circassians. The Medical Center community is an example of Israel’s diversity and coexistence. For more information contact Sharon Lapitsky atsharon@jewishtoledo.org or 419-724-0315.


Program on Zika Virus planned for July 12

Bowling Green Parks and Recreation is hosting a presentation by Wood County Health District epidemiologist Connor Rittwage and health educator Jennifer Campos on Zika Virus. The presentation will be held on Tuesday, July 12 at 7 p.m. at the Simpson Building Meeting Room at 1291 Conneaut Ave. in Bowling Green. The presentation will include an overview of Zika Virus: how it spreads where it is found symptoms and outcomes of Zika how it is transmitted how it is diagnosed how it is treated how it can be prevented The role of Wood County Health District in Zika surveillance and education.