History

Time capsule to share treasures of Wood County

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Except for a couple of children in the room, the audience was keenly aware that the time capsule being sealed in the wall would be opened without them. But this place is all about preserving the past for future generations – so the time capsule ceremony was no different. “When we’re all gone, it’s the objects we’ve left behind that tell the story,” said Holly Hartlerode, curator of the Wood County Historical Center. The audience on Saturday at the historical center got one last look at the items that will stay sealed until 2075 in a time capsule. Some items reflect the times – Kindles, cell phones and computer parts. Others tell personal stories – a nesting egg, barbershop music cassette tape and a ticket to a Horizon Youth Theatre performance. “It’s a great way to link ourselves to the future, the way we look back and find we are linked to the past,” said Michael Penrod, president of the Wood County Historical Society Board. Penrod likened the time capsule to the buried treasure in his favorite adventure movie, “Indiana Jones.” Except this treasure will be sealed up in a wall in the historical museum. “We opened up a lot of walls during the last year,” with all the renovations at the museum, so the timing was perfect, he said. Penrod, who is director of the Wood County District Public Library, donated an out-of-date Kindle from the library. He predicted that when the time capsule is opened in 2075, people will comment, “Oh, those librarians back then – they were so quaint.” Others also wanted future generations to get glimpses of our current technology. Edie Olds donated an old cell phone. When she first got it years ago, she thought it was so cool. “Now I wish we could bury all of them,” she said. George Stossel donated some bits of obsolete computer technology – but not the early pieces that were the size of a dishwasher, he said. Other items for the time capsule were of a more personal nature. They will be accompanied with notes describing their significance. Dana Nemeth, director of the historical center, donated a toy space shuttle from 2010 – minus a…


Library posts photos of BG’s Tomato Festival

Submitted by the WOOD COUNTY DISTRICT PUBLIC LIBRARY With the Bowling Green Holiday parade just a month off, take time to look back at parades from an earlier time. In August of 1938 and 1939, Bowling Green hosted a first and second Tomato Festival. The Wood County District Public Library has just posted 64 photos from the Jim and Joan Gordon Collection of the two festivals at:  https://www.facebook.com/WCDPL/photos/?tab=album&album_id=10154189749274671. Photos feature marching units, floats from local businesses and the contestants for the crown of Tomato Queen.  


Ordinary citizens honored for extraordinary lives

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   They may have looked like an ordinary farmer, teacher, nurse and small town mayor. But the four were recognized for being so much more than that Sunday during the annual Spirit of Wood County Awards presented in the courthouse atrium. Recognized were Dan Henry, Janet Stoudinger, Brian Tucker and Jean Gamble. “So many times, we forget to recognize people who do outstanding things,” said Wood County Commissioner Doris Herringshaw at the beginning of the event. The Spirit of Wood County Awards changed that during the bicentennial of the Northwest Ordinance in 1987. And after that, the county commissioners decided to make the awards an ongoing effort to recognize ordinary citizens for doing extraordinary acts. Dan Henry, of rural Bowling Green, was given the Agricultural Leadership Award. Henry, a former industrial arts teacher at Anthony Wayne, worked part time at Riker Farm Seed starting in 1975, said Lesley Riker, who nominated him for the award. Upon retiring from teaching, Henry took over presidency and full-time management of Riker Farm Seed. He is active in the Ohio Seed Improvement Association, is on the educational committee, and is active in Ohio Foundation Seeds and Advanced Genetics. “Dan believes strongly in education,” Riker said. Riker Farm Seed hosts corn and soybean test plots, field days and hosts several hundred FFA members who come to the farm for education on hybrid corn and soybeans. Henry is now working closely with Farm 4 Clean Water, OSU Extension and Wood Soil and Water in hosting demonstration plots for cover crops and how they can help with water run-off and nutrient uptake. “We as farmers are doing something for water quality,” Riker said. “I don’t know what we could do without him,” Riker said about Henry. Janet Stoudinger, of Wayne, who passed away in January, was recognized with the Self Government Award. Tom Bentley, who presented the award, said it was fitting that the ceremony was being held in the Alvin Perkins Atrium, since there was so many similarities between Perkins and Stoudinger. “He gave back a lot more than he took in – the same as Jan,” Bentley said. Stoudinger held positions as a teacher, coach and mayor of Wayne. “Jan taught us a…


Gold Star father urges voters to stand up to Trump

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   For more than a decade, Khizr and Ghazala Khan mourned the death of their son in private. That all changed after seven minutes in July when the two stood in front of their nation at the Democratic National Convention. Few who saw it will forget as Khizr Khan pulled a copy of the U.S. Constitution from his suit pocket, and asked Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump if he had read the document. On Sunday during a visit to the Islamic Center of Greater Toledo in Perrysburg Township, Khizr Khan bared his grief for his son, his pride for his country, and his motivation for his taking a stand. In 2004, the Khans’ son, Capt. Humayun Khan, 27, was killed in Iraq while serving with the U.S. Army. He was struck by a suicide bomb blast from a vehicle he had approached while warning others to stay back in order to protect them. His actions earned him posthumously a Purple Heart and Bronze Star medals. Khizr Khan, a Muslim from Pakistan who became a U.S. citizen in the 1970s, first talked openly about his son’s death after Trump began pushing his plan to ban Muslims in the U.S. A reporter called and asked if Khan would share his feelings about Trump’s proposal. Khan agreed, and a story was published. That article was later picked up by the Democratic National Committee, and Khan was asked if he and his wife would speak at the convention as a Gold Star Family. Khan was cautioned that speaking could create a firestorm. “Our other children warned us there will be political consequences,” he said. “We had grieved in privacy.” The deciding factor for Khan was when he received a letter from a young child asking if he as an attorney could stop Donald Trump from throwing her friend out of the United States. That did it. As his wife stood next to him on stage, Khan admonished Trump. “If it was up to Donald Trump, (my son) never would have been in America. Donald Trump consistently smears the character of Muslims. He disrespects other minorities, women, judges, even his own party leadership,” he said. After pulling out his copy of the U.S. Constitution, Khan asked, “Have you ever…


Students win big in Constitution ‘Jeopardy’ game

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   It’s not every day that kids get to shout in a library, or that a state legislator gets to pretend to be Alex Trebek. Just on U.S. Constitution Day, or in this case, the closest school day to the anniversary of Sept. 17, 1787, when the document was signed in Philadelphia. The Constitution Jeopardy contestants were excited, but well behaved fifth graders from Conneaut Elementary School. The game show host was State Senator Randy Gardner, R-Bowling Green, whose previous position as a history teacher helped prepare him for Friday’s role. The setting was the Wood County District Public Library, in the same room that will be used in less than two months for local adults to elect their public servants. “This room makes me nervous, because this is where I get hired or fired,” Gardner said to the students. He asked the children if they could name his boss. The names started flying. The president? No. The vice president? No. The governor? “Some people think so, but he knows he’s not. I’ve told him that before,” Gardner said. After several other wrong answers, Gardner revealed the answer. “You are my boss. I’m required to listen to you.” The fifth graders may not have been prepared for that question, but once the Constitution Jeopardy game began, they could not be stumped. The categories consisted of topics like the founding fathers, checks and balances, branches of the government, the creating the Constitution. The students had no trouble naming the law-making branch of government; the third president, who was not at the signing of the Constitution; and the location of the Constitutional Conference. A history teacher at heart, Gardner could not resist throwing out a few of his own questions, asking the number of congressional and senate members. The answers may not have always been exactly what he had in mind. When asked about other items associated with Philadelphia, children named cheese steak and Hershey chocolate. As the Jeopardy game heated up, without the aid of dueling buzzers, the teams shifted to raising hands rather than shouting out answers. Arms shot up for those knowing the power of a veto vote, and the First Amendment as defender of freedom of…


Ohio swing state status comes with privilege & pain

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Ohio is just a face in the crowd of 50 states most years. But every fourth year, we have bragging rights that our votes truly count. As Ohioans, we get showered with attention every presidential election – and unlike citizens in New York or California, we matter. That’s because Ohio has picked winners in presidential elections 28 out of 30 times since 1896. “Ohio, hands down is the most important,” said Melissa Miller, political science professor at Bowling Green State University. “We have the best record of swinging to the winner.” Ohio isn’t just a bellwether state, it is THE bellwether state, Miller said Tuesday. And this year, we may well be the swingingest of the swing states. “We could be the Florida of 2000,” she said. Miller will be giving a presentation for the public about Ohio’s status as a swing state, Wednesday at 7 p.m., at Zoar Lutheran Church, 314 E. Indiana Ave., in Perrysburg. Miller will talk about Ohio’s role as a battleground state – which puts its residents in the bulls eye for both Hillary Clinton’s and Donald Trump’s campaigns. The latest polls which include all four candidates – Clinton, Trump, the Libertarian’s Gary Johnson and the Green Party’s Jill Stein – show Clinton and Trump incredibly close in Ohio. “They’ve been neck and neck for a long time,” she said. And the campaigns know more about Ohio than many Ohioans do. They know that Ohio most closely maps the national popular vote. The average deviation has only been off by 2.2 percent in the last 30 elections, Miller said. They know Ohio most often puts the winner over the top in the Electoral College. “That’s huge,” she said. “We provide the last little edge” to push the winner over the 270 Electoral College votes needed to win. “That to me is just stunning.” Other battleground states are important. But none of them – not Florida, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Iowa or New Hampshire – have the long history of picking winners like Ohio. With our battleground status comes some privileges and some pain. We have more power, and are listened to more by the campaigns. The saying, “one person, one vote,” may hold…


180th Fighter Wing shares tribute video created for local 9/11 memorial

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News Anyone old enough to remember the Sept. 11 attacks that claimed nearly 3,000 lives in New York City, the Pentagon and a field in Pennsylvania, remember where they were when news broke of the terrorist attacks. As part of a memorial to those lives lost, members of the 180th Fighter Wing tell their stories of that day. One was still in school, in shop class, another was in a meeting at Wood Lane offices. One was serving in Saudi Arabia, another in New York City. And one was at the 180th, and piloted one of the many military jets scrambled that day. The 180th Fighter Wing is the site of Northwest Ohio’s 9/11 Memorial, currently under construction. Members of the 180th Fighter Wing were able to collect artifacts for the memorial, including steel beams from the World Trade Center, limestone from the Pentagon and soil from Pennsylvania where Flight 93 crashed. The memorial, designed as a sun dial, will also include locally, hand-blown glass pieces representing the 2,977 lives lost in the attacks. The memorial should be completed by Sept. 11, 2017.


A gathering of voices rises from Wood County’s past at Living History program

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Voices from Wood County’s past gathered and spoke Sunday at the 13th Annual Wood County Living History Day. Though no longer walking among us, these figures, said master of ceremonies Michael Penrod still have an impact on how we live. This collection of personages brought together by the county Historical Society had in common the theme of collections. They collected or the work they created was collected. Dominick Labino, a glass innovator in industry and art, created distinctly colored glass pieces that are in museums around the world. “That’s quite legacy,” said Keith Guion, the actor who portrayed him. Dorothy Uber Bryan’s paintings created while undergoing treatment for ovarian cancer are collected at the University of Toledo Health Science campus. Ella Dishong’s collection was the assembled goods of the small rural business proprietor that over time became collectible. Floy and Earl Shaffer found themselves collecting as a diversion from the grief of losing two sons, one as a child, and one in middle age. And Floy Shaffer’s own pottery was collected by regional buyers, including those who purchased her work in the early days of the Ann Arbor Street Art Fair. Lloyd Weddell’s skill as a woodworker meant his figurines and fiddles were treasured by many in the area. Jerry Hagerty’s interest in collecting Native American artifacts found in recently tilled farm land was one of the reasons he was asked to be the first caretaker of the Wood County Historical Center and Museum. Together these seven people’s stories, each presented by an actor and through a script penned usually by someone who knew them well, offered a slice of the county’s collective memory. Dominick Labino Labino’s story, told by Guion and written by his protégé Baker O’Brien, begins with his early admiration for the blacksmith in the town he grew up in. He admired the man’s ability to repair anything. Labino entered the glass industry and invented a number of patented products. He helped develop the glass fibers used on the bottom of the space shuttle. His fame came when he was asked by Otto Wittmann, the director of the Toledo Museum of Art, to lend his expertise to the fledgling effort to explore the use of glass…


New elevator to make history more accessible

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   More than a century ago, the Wood County Infirmary was a place of refuge for the sick, the elderly and the poor. Now, a historical museum, the site is again reaching out to those who need a little extra help. After months of renovations, the Wood County Historical Center will soon be fully accessible to the public. And museum staff will no longer have to disappoint physically handicapped guests by informing them that their visits will be limited to the first floor, explained Director Dana Nemeth. By the end of September, the historical center will be furnished with an elevator and handicapped accessible restrooms. “This building was meant to serve the community when it was a social welfare site,” said Holly Hartlerode Uppal, curator of the museum. “We gave people an opportunity to start over.” Though some have questioned the renovations to the historical building, Hartlerode Uppal believes the operators of the county infirmary would approve. “They would be very excited about all the improvements,” she said. “They did their best to take care of people and we are doing our best now.” The $1.2 million renovation, assisted by the state and county, has been extensive. The elevator will make stops at the basement, ground floor, first and second floors, and the attic. Because the west wing of the historical center is a couple steps lower than the center and east wings, the project required that indoor ramps be built on the first and second floors. The elevator will be accessible from the outside of the back of the building. A connecting driveway is being extended from the parking lot to the east, an ADA parking lot is being added just to the west of the elevator, and the driveway on the west will be expanded so buses can make the turn to access the elevator. The renovations also created four handicapped accessible restrooms, and a larger meeting room that can be rented out. The project will not only make it easier for people to move about the museum, but also make it easier for people to move some really heavy exhibit pieces. In fact, one room in the west wing is full right now of very…


Living History Day honors Wood County’s past

13th Annual Program Provides Glimpse Into Lives of Past Wood County Citizens The 13th annual Wood County Living History Day is Sunday, Aug. 28 at 2 p.m. at Oak Grove Cemetery on the campus of BGSU, Bowling Green, Ohio. Local residents portray citizens interred in Wood County and local cemeteries to promote local history. 2016 Honorees were chosen because of the Wood County Historical Center & Museum’s 2016 theme of collecting. This event is free and open to the public. “A Joyful Noise” will provide music before the event. Parking is available in the cemetery, as well as on the adjacent BGSU campus. The Wood County Sheriff’s Department will provide free rides up to the mound where the program will be held, with usher services provided by the BG Kiwanis Aktion Club.  Chairs are available, although those attending are encouraged to bring a lawn chair.  In case of heavy rain, the program will be moved to the First United Methodist Church, 1506 E. Wooster Street. 2016 honorees are: DOMINICK LABINO (1909-1987) – Co-founder of the studio glass movement in America and notable glass artist and collector with ties to Grand Rapids, Owens-Illinois, and the Toledo Museum of Art. Portrayed by Jamie Tompson DOROTHY UBER BRYAN (1924-2001) – Bowling Green native known for “The Chemo Paintings” series, created during her struggle with cancer. Dorothy and her husband, Ashel, were philanthropists and patrons of the arts. Portrayed by Katherine Hollingsworth, daughter of Dorothy Bryan ELLA DISHONG (1866-1948) – Owner of a general store in Hoytville full of antiques with husband Uriah Dishong until 1957.  Portrayed by Nancy Buchanan LLOYD WEDDELL (1916-1991) – A Luckey-area woodworking artist. Hand-carved fiddles and figurines are collected by local enthusiasts. Portrayed by Bob Willman, his son-in-law. JERRY HAGERTY (1901-1999) – A collector of Indian relics and first caretaker of the Wood County Historical Center and Museum.  Portrayed by Zach Robb FLOY (1923-1997) & EARL SHAFFER (1914-2008) – Earl was a high school chemistry teacher at Bowling Green High School and also collected toy trains. Floy studied ceramics at Bowling Green State University and was an award-winning nationally known ceramicist whose work was featured several times in Ceramics Monthly. Portrayed by Mary Dennis & Bob Midden A DVD of the event will be…


Piano stylist Michael Peslikis plays the music of the American experience

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Michael Peslikis describes himself as a piano stylist. He likes to play a variety of styles and that fluidity has served him well in his more than six decades as a professional musician. He played square dances at a dude ranch when he was 15. Played for silent movies, for musicals. He’s played ethnic music, his own Greek, and  Jewish, Irish, Italian, polkas as well as blues and ragtime – the soundtrack of the American melting pot.  He studied classical composition with Walter Piston at Harvard. This Wednesday Peslikis turns 80 in style. After 65 years as a professional he’s still intent on getting better. He’s flipped back the pages of time to return to the classical masters he studied as a youngster. You can still catch him around the area playing jazz and standards at Degage, serving up tunes for a brunch on holidays at the Hilton Garden Inn in Findlay, and jazzing up hymns at a church service on Sunday at St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran in Toledo. Peslikis started out playing in his native Queens, New York. There was a piano in his home, and his father a Greek immigrant businessman had a few friends over to play some music from their native land. The young Michael bragged he could play that music on the piano. They dismissed him. He was undeterred. “I sat down and played it anyway, and they said ‘give him lessons.’” Despite this early display of keyboard skill, his early musical success was as a singer. He sang in an all-city choir. Traveling by train weekly for rehearsals. He assumed he would pursue singing, but he ruined his voice by straining to sing high parts after his voice changed. In high school he formed a small band that played dances. At 15 he got his chance for his first union job, a gig at Thousand Acres Dude Ranch in the Adirondacks in upstate New York. He was actually too young, so he had to get dispensation from American Federation of Musicians strongman James Petrillo. Peslikis got the card, and spent the next summers playing resorts in the Catskills, the so –called Borscht Belt.  A musician had to be flexible and skilled at switching gears….


Theater & research a natural fit for Chautauqua

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News History feels right at home in Rossford. Ohio Chautauqua presented by the Ohio Humanities council set up its tent this week along the Maumee, to present five nights of living history. It opened Tuesday night with Susan Marie Frontczak bringing the pioneering scientist Marie Curie to life on the stage. It continues with presentations every night through Saturday. Dressed in a black dress Frontczak took the audience from Curie’s childhood in Warsaw under the rule of the Russian czar to her scientific lab in a Paris apartment she shared with her husband. Along the way Frontczak was careful to make the science as clear as possible for those, she said, who had never studied chemistry or had studied it so long ago they had forgotten it all. She told Curie’s story with a few gripping details, occasionally injecting humor. Learning to cook as a young wife was “my most mysterious science experiment.” When Curie’s family had to take in 10 young male students as boarders, she declared “that’s when I learned to concentrate.” As with all the presenters, Frontczak has to be an actor who captures the audience’s attention and engages their imaginations. She has to be a writer who can encapsulate a notable life story within 50 minutes. And she has to be a scholar who must research her subject and master that research not only to create an accurate script, but also to be able to answer audience members questions both in character and out of character. On Tuesday Frontczak demonstrated how she could extemporize in character as she carried on exchanges with the audience. At one point, someone asked about the death of Curie’s husband. Without faltering, Frontczak described the circumstances of his death and Curie’s deep grief in the months afterward. As a researcher, she explained, that Curie was well accepted by her fellow scientists. Most importantly she was supported in her work by her father and her husband, who insisted the Nobel Prize be awarded in both their names, not just his. Dan Cutler, who appears Wednesday as Cornstalk (Hokoleskwa), a Shawnee Indian chief, said people have approached him about becoming living history actors, and when he tells them about the research involved they…


Black Swamp Arts Festival music acts don’t skip a beat in time of change (Updated)

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Black Swamp Arts Festival will feature a mix of new and familiar acts. That’s not unusual. That they feature veterans and newcomers is also par for the course. That those act will come on the wings of critical plaudits, well that goes without saying. Probably the biggest change on the festival’s music scene is one most people may not notice, and that’s as it should be. Kelly Wicks, one of the festival’s founders, is stepping down from his role as chair of the performing arts committee. Taking on that key role are Cole Christensen and Tim Concannon, two long-time festival volunteers who’ve worked with Wicks. “We’re not reinventing the wheel,” Christensen said. “It’s about preserving the great traditions of the Black Swamp Arts Festival. We’ll continue to feature local regional national and international talent and also to give people acts people don’t get to see. The festival has reputation for having great music, and we’re going to keep that.” That means performers whom festivalgoers have never heard of before will be their favorites after the second weekend in September. After a few months of learning the ropes (with Wicks offering some advice), most of the main stage slots are booked for the festival that kicks off Friday, Sept. 9, at 5 p.m. and closes Sunday, Sept. 11, at 5 p.m. It’s been bookended by the blues. The festival opens with the Tony Godsey band, a regional blues band that’s set to release its aptly title “Black Swamp Territory,” a collection of 10 original tunes. Closing will be an old friend, Michael Katon, the Boogieman from Hell (Michigan, that is). At one point, Katon had played Howard’s Club H more than any other performer. He was a regular at Christmastime, playing Christmas Eve, the blues equivalent of the Magi. In the past decade, though, he’s mostly been booked across the pond. Christensen said that Katon is excited to be returning to Bowling Green. On Saturday night he’ll return to his old haunts with a free show at Howard’s. In between Godsey and the man from Hell, there’ll be more blues, reggae, bluegrass and all sounds Americana. Christensen is especially excited about Mariachi Flor de Toloache, an all-female mariachi band…


Diving head first in no-hands pie eating contest

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Six grown men tested their stamina and their stomachs Saturday during a no-hands pie eating contest at the Heritage Farm Festival held at the Wood County Park District’s Carter Historic Farm. James Benschoter put his beard in a ponytail. Dylan Thomason starved himself ahead of time. And Joel Kuhlman thought he was prepared. “I was actually looking forward to it all week – until I got here,” said Kuhlman, a Wood County commissioner. The rules were simple, but strict. No utensils. No hands. The first person to finish and stand up won $20. “The rest of you get to finish the pie we gave you,” said Bryan Bockbrader, the park district’s stewardship coordinator. “If you pass out in your chair, you are disqualified,” he added. The men were thanked for sacrificing their dignity, then told to begin. The apple pies went down easy to start, with the men occasionally lifting their heads to breathe. All the contestants were given large bandana handkerchiefs to use as bibs. But most were employed to get apple pie out of their noses. As they labored to inhale the desserts, Bockbrader egged them on. “This is muskrat pie, we found it along the road.” Thomason, the youngest of the group, was going strong right up till the end. “No more pie for me for a year,” he said after he walked from the table and slumped down to the ground. John Dalton, the eldest of the group, gave it a noble effort, rarely lifting his head from the pie plate. But in the end, the first man to devour down to a clean pie tin was Chris Henschen. His secret was picking up the pie plate with his teeth and banging it on the table to break up the crust so it was easy to handle. “Slow and steady,” Henschen said with a smile. “I do like apple pie.” The Heritage Farm Festival was also an educational experience for younger participants. Children learned that planting potatoes is harder than ordering French fries at the drive-thru window. They learned that cutting a log with a hand saw takes much longer than using a chainsaw. They saw the corn being milled and then ate…


Ohio Humanities Presents Ohio Chautauqua in Rossford

From ROSSFORD CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU   History comes to life  in Rossford June 28 through July 2 when Ohio Humanities brings its  Ohio Chautauqua 2016 tour to Rossford. The theme for 2016 is “The Natural World” featuring chemist Marie Curie, Iroquois leader Cornstalk, Frankenstein author Mary Shelley, President Theodore Roosevelt, and zoologist Dian Fossey. Building on the 19th-century tradition established on the shores of New York’s Chautauqua Lake, Ohio Chautauqua is a five-day community event that combines living history performances, music, education, and audience participation into a one-of-a-kind cultural event the entire community will enjoy. Daytime activities feature stimulating adult programs and hands-on workshops for youth hosted at the Rossford Library, 720 Dixie Highway. Each evening, family, friends and visitors gather as live music fills the air in Veterans Park at the Marina, 300 Hannum Avenue with convenient parking and buses from Rossford High School. Then, a talented performer appears on stage, bringing a historic figure to life through personal stories and historic detail. This enriching and delightfully entertaining experience is perfect for every generation. With its warm, nostalgic vibe, this truly unique experience is sure to open minds and start conversations. A daily schedule can be found online at www.VisitRossfordOhio.com or www.OhioHumanities.org. Sponsors of Ohio Chautauqua 2016 in Rossford, Ohio include Ohio Humanities, the Rossford Convention & Visitors Bureau, ProMedica Bay Park Hospital, Lake Erie Living Magazine, Welch Publishing, Wood County Cultural Arts Grant, TARTA, Northwestern Water & Sewer District, the Rossford Business Association, Meijer Rossford, Costco Perrysburg, Camping World, the City of Rossford and the Rossford Library. Daytime Programs Rossford Public Library 720 Dixie Highway, 
Rossford. Programs for youth begin at 10 a.m. Tuesday, June 28: Dan Cutler: Prehistoric People—How Primitive Were They? Wednesday, June 29: Susan Marie Frontczak: Once Upon a Time—Frankenstein Thursday, June 30: Dianne Moran: Animal Researchers Friday, July 1: Chuck Chalberg: Roosevelt as a Hunter & Explorer Saturday, July 2: Susan Marie Frontczak: Storytelling: Science and Engineering through Stories Programs for adults begin at 2 p.m. Tuesday, June 28: Dan Cutler: How the “Skin Trade” Changed Traditional Native Values Wednesday, June 29: Susan Marie Frontczak: Does a Clone Have a Soul – or – Grappling with the Monster Thursday, June 30: Dianne Moran: Dian Fossey, Passionate Mountain Gorilla Researcher and Defender…