Arts at Bowling Green State University

BGSU Arts Events through March 13

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS At the galleries —The 67th Annual Undergraduate Art Exhibition, a juried selection of art in all media by students in the School of Art, will remain open through Feb. 19. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Thursday evenings 6-9 p.m., and Sunday 1-4 p.m. The show will be open Presidents Day, Monday, Feb. 19. Feb. 15 — Guest artist Mark Fewer will conduct a violin master class. Described as “genre-bending” by the National Post, and “intrepid” by the Globe and Mail, Fewer has performed around the world to critical acclaim, including performances from the early baroque to the avant-garde, with recent performances as soloist with groups as wide-ranging as the Melbourne Symphony, the Fodens-Richardson Brass Band, the Zapp Quartet and the McGill Percussion Ensemble. The class will begin at 2:30 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Feb. 15 — The University Band and Concert Band will perform a concert. Advance tickets are $7 for students and $10 for other adults; tickets the day of the concert are, respectively, $10 and $13. Tickets can also be purchased at bgsu.edu/arts. For more information, call the box office between noon and 6 p.m. weekdays at 419-372-8171. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Feb. 15 — The BGSU theatre department presents the opening performance of “The Language Archive,” playwright Julia Cho’s comedy about a scholar of dead or dying languages who finds it impossible to verbalize love in any of the obscure languages he has mastered, and who perhaps feels more affection for language than for people. Advance tickets are $5 for BGSU students and $15 for other adults; all tickets the day of the concert are $20. Tickets can also be purchased at bgsu.edu/arts. For more information, call the box office between noon and 6 p.m. weekdays at 419-372-8171. The show opens at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre at the Wolfe…


BGSU Arts Events through Jan. 23

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Jan. 10 — BGSU’s Guest Artist Series welcomes back former faculty member and pianist Yu-Lien The. A prizewinner of the 12th International Piano Competition Viotti-Valsesia and the Deutsche Musikwettbewerb, The has performed at the Gilmore International Keyboard Festival and at Carnegie Hall, with the new music ensemble Opus21. Frequent collaborations with saxophonists Joe Lulloff and Henning Schröder have led to several world premieres of new commissions for both piano and saxophone. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 13 — Sigma Alpha Iota members will present a Winter Musicale at 6 p.m. in the Choral Rehearsal Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 14 — Praecepta, the student chapter of the Society of Composers, Inc., will present a performance of their work titled “24/24.” The group promotes new music activities in the Bowling Green community. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 16 — Violinist Harvey Thurmer is the next performer in the Guest Artist Series. Thurmer is active in the promotion and recording of new music. His recording of Kurtag’s “Kafka Fragmente” with soprano Audrey Luna, available on the Ars Moderno label, represents the first recording of this monumental work by American artists. The performance will begin at 8 pm in Bryan Recital Hall, located in the Moore Musical ArtsCenter. Free Jan. 18 — Visiting Writer Clifford Chase will read from his fiction. Author of “Winkie” and “The Tooth Fairy: Parents, Lovers, and Other Wayward Deities (A Memoir),” Chase teaches at Wesleyan University. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Jan. 18 — The Guest Artist Series presents Li-Shan Hung on the piano. She made her Carnegie Hall debut at Weill Hall in 2003 and was invited to present a second Weill Hall recital in 2005. The recipient of numerous music performance prizes, she has performed and taught around the world. Her performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 19 — BGSU presents EAR | EYE: Listening and Looking: Contemporary Music and Art in conjunction…


BGSU Arts Events through Dec. 3

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Nov. 26 – Praecepta, the student chapter of the Society of Composers Inc. at BGSU’s College of Musical Arts, will give a performance at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 27 – The Graduate String Quartet will perform at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 28 – The University Choral Society will perform a festive holiday program titled “Joyous Sounds: A Yuletide Celebration,” featuring the BGSU Graduate Brass Quintet and Michael Gartz, organist at First United Methodist Church. The performance will begin 7 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church of Bowling Green. Free Nov. 29 – Trombonist Brittany Lasch will give a Faculty Artist Series performance. Lasch was the winner of the 2015 National Collegiate Solo Competition hosted by the U.S. Army Band and the 2010 Eisenberg-Fried Brass Concerto Competition, and was the recipient of the Zulalian Foundation Award in 2014. Her trombone quartet Boston Based was just named the winner of the 2017 International Trombone Association’s Quartet Competition. Her performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 30 – The Concert Band will give a concert at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall, located in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $7 for students and $10 for other adults; tickets the day of the concert are, respectively, $10 and $13. Tickets can also be purchased at bgsu.edu/arts. For more information, call the box office between noon and 6 p.m. weekdays at 419-372-8171. Dec. 1 – Celloist Deborah Pae will conduct a free master class at 3:30 p.m. in the Choral Rehearsal Hall and give a free performance at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, both at at the Moore Musical Arts Center.  Pae’s 2017-2018 season highlights include concerto performances of “Rhapsodies for Cello and Strings” by Jeffrey Mumford and Haydn’s Concerto in C as well as chamber music and solo recital tours in New York, San Francisco, Toronto, London, Brussels, France, Indonesia and Taiwan. Dec. 1 – The Men’s and Women’s Chorus will be in concert at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall,…


BGSU Arts Events through Oct. 31

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Through Nov. 9 – “Milestones: A Celebration of BGSU School of Art Alumni Featuring Studio Arts, Design and the 25th Anniversary of the Digital Arts Program” continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery at the Fine Arts Center. The exhibit is part of the 38th annual Bowling Green State University New Music and Art Festival. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m.Sundays. Admission is free. Oct. 20– The 38th annual New Music and Art Festival presents Concert 6, featuring the mixed-chamber group Latitude 49 (L49), whose focus on commissioning and supporting living composers has resulted in more than 30 works written for them. Their performance will begin at 8 p.m. at Kobacker Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 21– The 38th annual New Music and Art Festival presents a panel discussion at 10:30 a.m. at the Marjorie E. Conrad, M.D. Choral Room, located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Oct. 21– The 38th annual New Music and Art Festival presents Concert 7, featuring electroacoustic works by Kong Mee Choi, Asha Srinivasan, Mike McFerron, Scott Miller, Jay C. Batzner and Konstantinos Karathanasis. The performance will begin at 2:30 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall, in the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 21– The 38th annual New Music and Art Festival presents the final concert, Concert 8, featuring the Bowling Green Philharmonia and Percussion Ensemble in a performance of a series of orchestral and percussion works. Tickets are $7 in advance and can be purchased at bgsu.edu/arts. The concert will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall, at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Oct. 22 – The Sunday Matinee Series presents“Scott of the Antarctic”(1948, England, 110 minutes, directed by Charles Frend with John Mills, Derek Bond and Diana Churchill), with an introduction by film historian Dr. Jan Wahl. The harrowing race to the South Pole between Captain Robert Scott and Roald Amundsen of Scandinavia was a battle for survival. Which man would be the first to win fame and glory for his country, enduring the cold, the blizzards, the mountains and…


New Music Festival guest composers embrace the weird & beautiful in their work

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Steve Mackey and Sarah Kirkland Snider came into contemporary music through back doors. A rock musician in the mid-1970s Mackey was majoring in physics as his fall back plan if his rock star dream didn’t come true. Growing up Snider studied cello, piano and attended choir camp in the summer “Music was my favorite thing to do,” she said. That included writing music which she never showed anyone.  When she went to college she studied psychology and sociology and after graduating ended up working for the Center of Reproductive Justice. To fulfill a requirement in college Mackey took a music history class. Thus exposed him to the world of classical music including Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring,” which he called “his gateway drug” to new music. At the time, music industry types who heard his band were impressed but said the music was “spacey, weird and undanceable.” Well, Stravinsky’s ballet music was also spacey, weird and famously difficult to dance to. Mackey was impressed that in the “Rite” and other classical pieces “all of human experience was distilled into a listening experience. “ With the rock band he was accompanying beer drinking, flirtation, and fending off requests for Doobie Brothers’ covers. Living in New York, Snider was called on by friends to write music for theatrical productions. She was so involved she was being called on the carpet for missing work to compose. She decided to make the transition into music. Since she had not majored in music at 24, she set about undertaking a four-year personal music course. At 29, she started studying composition at Yale. Both now are recognized composers whose works are performed around the world. Mackey and Snider, who are married, are on campus as the guest composers for the 38th New Music and Art Festival which continues through Saturday night. For a schedule of performances click. Snyder and Mackey talked about their music and the contemporary music scene in an open conversation with Kurt Doles the director of the MidAmerican…


BGSU Arts Events through Oct. 24

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING  & COMMUNICATIONS Oct. 11 – The Faculty Artist Series presents BGSU tuba/euphonium instructor David Saltzman. An active soloist and chamber musician, Saltzman was the winner of the 1996 Colonial Euphonium Tuba Quartet’s Tuba Solo Competition in Albany, New York. Since then, he has performed solo recitals at many regional and international festivals, and he has most recently been part of a consortium of tuba players commissioning a new concerto for tuba by Samuel Adler, currently slated to premiere in October 2018. Salzman’s performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 12 – The Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble will perform as part of a small ensemble with guest artist Matthew Murchison. Murchison is known as a varied performer, composer, arranger, educator, conductor and producer. He was a member of the River City Brass in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, from 2002-15, and was the principal solo euphonium for the last nine of those years. Since then, Murchison has performed solo and chamber music concerts across the U.S. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 13 – The BGSU Concert Band will perform as part of Homecoming festivities. The band will perform traditional repertoire and new compositions by the world’s leading composers, conducted by Dr. Bruce Moss. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets in advance are $3 for students and $7 for adults and available at bgsu.edu/arts or by calling 419-372-8171. Oct. 15 – The Sunday Matinee Series presents “Bedroom, Parlor and Bath” (1931, U.S.A., 85 minutes, directed by Edward Sedwick, with Buster Keaton, Charlotte Greenwood and Reginald Denny), with an introduction by film historian Dr. Jan Wahl. It very well may be that Buster Keaton’s greatest achievements lay in the silent era when he was allowed to control the making of each film. Yet his was a genius that could not be entirely diminished, even by the bosses at MGM. Keaton was able to adapt to this new medium, so now we were able to hear…


BGSU arts events through Oct. 17

Oct. 5 – The International Film Series presents “The Mermaid” (2016, China, 94 minutes, directed by Xingchi Zhou [Stephen Chow]), with an introduction by Elizabeth Niehaus, doctoral student in American culture studies. Breaking box office records to become China’s highest-grossing film to date, “The Mermaid” sees hit director Chow (“Shaolin Soccer,” “Kung Fu Hustle”) bring his zany, comic style to a modern fairytale with an environmentalist message. After their peaceful existence is destroyed by pollution and underwater sonar, a group of merfolk send an alluring mermaid to kill the young businessman responsible. Their revenge scheme hits a snag when mermaid and tycoon fall in love. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Oct. 5 – The Visiting Writer Series features poet Christopher Kempf, author of “Late in the Empire of Men,” which won the 2015 Levis Prize from Four Way Books. He is also the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship and a Wallace Stegner Fellowship from Stanford University. His poetry, essays and reviews have appeared in Gettysburg Review, Kenyon Review Online, The New Republic, PEN America and Ploughshares. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Oct. 5 – The BGSU Trumpet Guild will perform at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 11 – The Faculty Artist Series presents BGSU tuba/euphonium instructor David Saltzman. An active soloist and chamber musician, Saltzman was the winner of the 1996 Colonial Euphonium Tuba Quartet’s Tuba Solo Competition in Albany, New York. Since then, he has performed solo recitals at many regional and international festivals, and he has most recently been part of a consortium of tuba players commissioning a new concerto for tuba by Samuel Adler, currently slated to premiere in October 2018. Salzman’s performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Oct. 12 – The Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble will perform as part of a small ensemble with guest artist Matthew Murchison. Murchison is known as a varied performer, composer, arranger, educator,…


BGSU Arts Events through Sept. 26

Sept. 6 – The Faculty Artist Series features violinist Penny Thompson Kruse at 8 p.m.in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 7 – Spotlight on the Arts focuses on creative writing with a talk by Dr. Lawrence Coates, chair of the Department of English and award-winning author of novels “The Master of Monterey,” “The Blossom Festival,” “The Garden of the World” and “Camp Olvido.” Coates will discuss “Temporary Landscapes: The Fiction of Place,” at 7:30 p.m. in the Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre at the Wolfe Center for the Arts. A reception will follow. Free Sept. 8 – Family Weekend kicks off with a family-friendly showcase featuring the College of Musical Arts, Department of Theatre and Film and the School of Art. The showcase begins at 7 p.m. in the Thomas B. and Kathleen M. Donnell Theatre at the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Free Sept. 11 – The ARTalk series begins with “Strings, Folds and Rabbit Holes” by 1981 alumna Kristy Deetz, arts and visual design professor at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Her talk will begin at 6 p.m. in 204 Fine Arts Center. Free Sept. 12 – In conjunction with the exhibit “FABRICation,” Kristy Deetz, arts and visual design professor at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, will give a gallery talk on “The Curator’s Process.” The talk will begin at 5:30 p.m. in the Willard Wankelman Gallery at the Fine Arts Center. Free Sept. 12 – Tuesdays at the Gish presents “The Virgin Suicides” (1999, U.S., 97 minutes, directed by Sofia Coppola). This coming-of-age film, starring Kirsten Dunst and Josh Hartnett, features five sisters and the group of boys who become fascinated by their troubled lives. The film can be discussed in relation to current-day debates surrounding the series “13 Reasons Why.” Coppola, who later won the Best Screenplay Oscar for “Lost in Translation” (2003), has said that reading “The Virgin Suicides” novel is what prompted her to become a filmmaker. With an introduction by Kathleen Kollman, a doctoral student in American culture studies, the screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Sept. 13 – Faculty Artist…


BGSU galleries hosting NOWOH art exhibit

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS Bowling Green State University Art Galleries is hosting the 10th Annual Northwest Ohio (NOWOH) Community Art Exhibition. NOWOH celebrates the talents of regional artists in a professional setting. The show opens Friday, July 14 at 7 p.m. with a gallery talk by the award juror Robert Thurmer, followed by the opening reception with light refreshments. Located at the BGSU Fine Arts Center, the exhibition is free and open to the public. Robert Thurmer has served as the director of the Cleveland State University Art Gallery since 1990. As a professor of art studio at CTU he is interested in the development of the individual from simple visual literacy to connoisseurship, and the understanding and appreciation of the elements and principles of art. Artists who display their work at the exhibition are eligible to win up to $1,500 in cash prizes and gift certificates. Among the awards are Best of Show, People’s Choice, the Kiwanis Young Artist Award and the Toledo Federation of Arts Societies Award. Artists of all skill levels, 16 years of age and older, are encouraged to enter. Online registration is open until July 1. Artists may enter in person on July 8. Further information regarding how to enter can be found at www.NowohArtShow.org. Artists from the following counties are eligible: Defiance, Erie, Fulton, Hancock, Henry, Lucas, Ottawa, Paulding, Sandusky, Seneca, Williams and Wood. For artists ages 16-18 the entry fees are $15, and for artists 19 and older entry fees are $30.  All entrants are able to submit up to three entries. Volunteers are needed to assist with the set up and take down of the event as well as gallery hosting during the exhibition. Artists who volunteer for the event will receive a registration discount. Contact Jacqueline Nathan at galleries@bgsu.edu for more information about volunteering. NOWOH hours are Thursday evenings, 6-8 p.m. and Friday through Sunday from 1-4 p.m. The exhibit will continue until July 29. Show sponsors include The Ohio Arts Council, BGSU Galleries, Toledo Federation of Arts Societies, Bowling Green Kiwanis, Drs. Phipps, Levin and Hebeka, Mr. Jeffery & Dr. Inge Klopping, the Art Depo,…


Campus arts initiative at BGSU gives trustees a song & dance

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When William Mathis was discussing arts on campus as he sought to take over as dean of the College of Musical Arts there was a lot of talk about “creating a culture of the arts” at Bowling Green State University. Looking around, though, he came to realize that there is a culture of the arts. “It does permeate through the campus,” he said, and beyond. Mathis, who in addition to his duties as dean has been called on to coordinate the arts, presented an educational session to the BGSU Board of Trustees at their May meeting. He came with numbers – 1,500 students have arts majors on campus and incoming arts majors have an average ACT score of 26, “so they’re academically prepared.” Mathis noted there are 32 student organizations related to the arts. Last year more than 800 events were staged on campus. He didn’t leave it there. The arts programs are mostly in two colleges, the College of Musical Arts and the College of Arts and Science, the home for the School of Art, the Department of Theatre and Film, and the Creative Writing Program. (Dance is located in the School of Human Movement, Sport, and Leisure Studies.) He brought some of those numbers with him to do the talking and singing. The women’s chorus of Voices of BGSU, a gospel choir, was first up, led by Christopher Carter, the student who founded the choir in 2013. Carter is a Trustees Leadership Scholarship winner. The Voices, he said, have been, along with other campus groups, his home at BGSU. Carter, who has added a music minor to his studies, said: “I’m so grateful for the environment that’s allowed Voices to flourish.” He noted the diversity of the dozen singers who entertained the trustees. They are students not only of different races, but from different places, and studying a range of disciplines. “I’ve learned some of the greatest lessons from these people.” “Our goal is to create connections across campus,” Mathis said. Kim…


Young conductor brings Mahler masterwork to BGSU stage

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In “Das Lied von der Erde (The Song of the Earth)” the composer Gustav Mahler tried to trick fate. Diagnosed with a health ailment, and emotionally reeling from the death of his eldest daughter, he didn’t want to write what would be his Ninth Symphony. For other composers the ninth symphony was their last. So he wrote “The Song of the Earth,” a six movement work of symphonic proportions, but didn’t call it a symphony, said Bowling Green State University musicologist Eftychia Papanikolaou. The piece also called for a large orchestra so was difficult to perform. But in the early 20th century a group of Viennese musicians including Arnold Schoenberg decided this work should be performed more often. So a reduction of the score for 14 musicians was created. Conductor Mercedes Diaz Garcia, a doctoral student at the College of Musical Arts, was drawn to the piece and decided that she wanted to present it to the Bowling Green community. So she recruited the musicians and the two vocal soloists. They’ve been rehearsing the difficult hour-long work for weeks and will present it Wednesday, April 19, at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall on campus. The project is an act of love for all concerned. Diaz Garcia can’t pay anyone, and the project is not part of her doctoral studies. “‘The Song of the Earth’ is not about the physical earth but about the inner world, it’s about the depth of the human soul. So it’s very deep, it’s very exhausting,” the conductor said. For all its challenges she found musicians who are up to the difficult task and willing to take it on. “I think they are very interested to play this because it’s Mahler. Mahler for orchestral musicians is a huge challenge. It’s so intense and so emotionally powerful.” And because of the small number of musicians, Diaz Garcia said. “Everyone’s a soloist so it’s very demanding and very exposed for everyone. That’s something musicians like.” It gives them more freedom to express…


Bill Mathis ready to move arts at BGSU into a new era as music dean

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News William Mathis takes charge as dean of the College of Musical Arts at a crucial time for arts education. Focusing on the traditional paths of performance and music education will not be enough for higher education music programs. “It’s a different arts and musical landscape then when I was coming up,” said Mathis, 56. While making sure students continue to achieve “technical and musical mastery,” the college needs to broaden its offerings. “We talk a lot about musical entrepreneurship, and I’ve been thinking about citizenship in the arts, arts advocacy and the connection to communities, and how the arts can impact the life of society in our local community,” he said. “The skills that requires are not part of a traditional music curriculum. How can we give that to them? I’ve been thinking about this a lot this year.” Music programs, and arts programs in general, need to prepare their student for a new entrepreneurial environment. “Twenty years from now the schools of music adapting to this will be around,” Mathis said. The fate of those sticking to the more traditional approach is less certain. Mathis wants BGSU to in the forefront of those that survive. Mathis stepped into the role of interim dean last July after Jeff Showell announced his retirement. After a national search, he was named dean in February. Mathis said he felt his administrative background made him a prime internal candidate for the permanent position. He’s served as chair of the Department of Performance Studies and as the college’s graduate coordinator. “I have a disposition that lends itself to this kind of work,” he said. “If I may, the kind of balancing, the level of ambiguity that kind of exists all the time… doesn’t scare me.” The key is “to be able to navigate through this with some kind of strategic vision and action because there’s so many external forces we don’t have control over. …. I have a higher tolerance for that where others may get frustrated. …It’s not…


BGSU arts events through April 28

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS April 13 – The International Film Series continues with the Swedish film “Force Majeure,” directed by Ruben Östlund. An award winner at the Cannes Film Festival, the Toronto Film Festival, and other internationally recognized venues, the film deftly explores the emotional dimensions of the legal term “force majeure,” an unexpected event (such as a hurricane) that releases both parties from the obligations of a contract. In this story, the ski vacation of a seemingly ideal family takes a sudden turn when an avalanche approaches them as they are having a pleasant lunch at the lodge. The screening will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 13 – Prout Readings conclude with B.F.A. student readings at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free April 13 – Bowling Green Opera Theater presents a variety of opera scenes. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free April 14 – The University Choral Society and Early Music Ensemble present Bach’s “St. John Passion.” The moving and sacred oratorio of Johann Sebastian Bach is a dramatic representation of the Passion as told in the Gospel of John for the Good Friday Vespers of 1724. Revel in the extravagant, expressive music of the season. The performance will begin at 7 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church, East Wooster St., Bowling Green. Free April 14 – The Toledo Museum of Art and BGSU’s College of Musical Arts present EAR | EYE Listening and Looking: Contemporary Music and Art. The performance and discussion series will feature BGSU doctoral candidates in music performing in response to the work in the Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic exhibit. It begins at 7 p.m. in the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St, Toledo. Free April 18 – Music at the Manor House features the Graduate String Quartet. The performance will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Manor House in Wildwood Metropark, 5100 W. Central Ave., in…


St. John Passion in its element as Good Friday offering

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Liturgy and drama are one in Bach’s St. John Passion. The theatrical elements – a narrator, dialogue, and the evocative underscoring for small orchestra—are undeniable. Yet the message and the story almost demand the setting of a church. Yes, it is presented in a concert hall, but that’s akin to a staged reading of a play as opposed to a fully staged production. The St. John Passion was fully in its element on Palm Sunday afternoon in Hope Lutheran Church in Toledo. The Passion, one of two that have come down to us from Bach, the other being the monumental St. Matthew, was presented by musicians from Bowling Green State University. The performance brought together the Early Music Ensemble, directed by Arne Spohr, the University Choral Society directed by Mark Munson, who also conducted the work, organist Michael Gartz, and voice faculty taking on the principal roles and solos. Munson said he’s been waiting for Easter to fall late enough in the semester to be able to prepare the Passion for presentation during Holy Week. So on Good Friday, April 14, the St. John Passion will be presented at 7 p.m. in First United Methodist Church in Bowling Green as the community commemoration of the day. The Passion was first performed in 1724, revised over time, though the final version reverted to much the same as it was originally performed. As presented in Bach’s time, a sermon would be preached between parts one and two. Those in attendance Sunday were advised not to applaud between the two movements. Spohr read several verses of the gospel in Martin Luther’s German translation between the sections. The Passion develops on several fronts. The Evangelist, sung by Christopher Scholl, tells the story, with the direct quotations sung by other vocalists, including Lance Ashmore as Jesus. Interposed in the narration are reflections – chorales sung by the 40-voice choir and arias sung by four soloists alto Ellen Scholl, soprano Chelsea Cloeter, tenor Christopher Scholl, tenor, and bass/baritone Ashmore. Underneath…


BGSU arts events through April 18

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS April 7 – The Collegiate Chorale and University Women’s Chorus will perform at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Advance tickets are $3 for students and children and $7 for adults. All tickets are $10 the day of the performance. Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the Wolfe Center, by phone at 419-372-8171, or online at http://www.bgsu.edu/the-arts/. April 7 – The elsewhere theater season concludes with “Dying City,” written by Christopher Shin and directed by Tanner Lias. The performance begins at 8 p.m. in the Eva Marie Saint Theatre located in the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Additional performances will be at 8 p.m. on April 8 and 9. Free April 8 – The Dr. Marjorie Conrad Art Song Competition will take place in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Preliminaries will begin at noon, with finals following at 8 p.m. Free April 8 – An opening reception for the MFA I Thesis Exhibition will begin at 7 p.m. in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman Galleries in the Fine Arts Center. Free Through April 18 – The MFA I Thesis Exhibition will be on display in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman Galleries in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free April 9 – The Sunday Matinee Series continues with the 1925 film “The Lost World,” directed by Harry G. Hoyt. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was not only the creator of Sherlock Holmes, he happened to write imaginative first-rate adventures, including this tale which involves one Professor Challenge who discovers a jungle plateau where prehistoric beasts thrive — all masterfully animated by Willis O’Brien, who would bring to thrilling life King Kong. The screening will begin at 3 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free April 9 – The Douglas Wayland Student Chamber Competition winners will perform at…