Business

Bowling Green Beer Works Draws Steady Following

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News This is the closest that Bowling Green gets to a speakeasy. The establishment sits tucked away in a cluster of old garages at 322 North Grove St. On weekends – Friday, 4:30 to 10 p.m. and Saturday, 1 to 10 p.m., customers slip in through a back door. A newcomer can be forgiven for suspecting a secret word may be required to gain entry. Inside a couple dozen people hang out, all with pint canning jars of beer in front of them. Some of the beer is golden, some the color of caramel, others dark as chocolate. Not a “lite” beer in sight. Welcome to Bowling Green Beer Works. Here the beer is consumed within a few feet of where it is brewed. In the cooler in the corner rests the beer they’ll be sipping next week. Consumption takes its rightful place as the last step in the brewing process. The micro brewery’s owner Justin Marx presides over the scene. He makes suggestions, describes his product, accepts comments, most of them compliments. These Friday and Saturday tastings culminate his week of work making the up to 10 varieties that he offers on any given night. “I love my clientele,” Marx said. “We like to have a neighborhood feel. I can’t believe the tremendous amount of support we’ve gotten.” He first applied for his permit back in September, 2014, and finally secured all his federal, state and local paperwork, so he could open the tasting room, in September, 2015. His love of beer making dates back further than that. Back, Marx, 42, said, to before he was legally of age to consume his product. That was in the State of Oregon, then the epicenter of the craft brewing movement. In the late 1980s, Marx said, the business model was pairing the beer with burgers. But when the market contracted in the late 1990s, the brewers shed the beef and put all the emphasis on their beer. Craft breweries have sprung up across the nation. Ohio…


Nightlife ain’t no life without Corner Grill; Howard’s show to benefit displaced workers

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Saturday’s benefit for employees of the Corner Grill should help out Patrick McDermott’s finances. He’s been out of work since an early morning fire destroyed the interior of the landmark Bowling Green eatery on Feb. 1. Still for him the show, which will run from 1 p.m. Saturday to 2 a.m. Sunday, at Howard’s Club H at 210 N. Main St., is about more than money. He’s looking forward to seeing his old customers. McDermott worked the third shift, so he cooked for folks who just got off late night shifts at bars and other restaurants and he cooked for folks just heading to their jobs. “I’d like to reconnect, hang out with them for the day.” Nikki Cordy, a long time employee at Howard’s, said the idea for the benefit got started while the interior of the diner was still smoldering. So she set out to book 12 hours of music. After five hours, the bill was filled. A few acts had to be turned away. Among those performing will be Circle the Sun, Harlow, The Casket Company, Birthquake, Fathom City, Scare Me Green, Adam Rice, Justin Payne, Ginger and the Snaps, Mike Dubose, Tom Vasey, and the Defenders. There will be a $5 cover charge. Cordy said she had “a soft spot in her heart” for the Grill. Sometimes Larry Cain, who owns the Corner Grill, would bring over food when he knew the Howards crew hadn’t had a chance to take a break. The Grill always was able to accommodate her gluten-free diet required by her celiac disease. “It’s about family,” she said. After closing time, the Howard’s staff and other night shift workers to unwind, have breakfast and a cup a tea, after a long night’s work. The workers included musicians. Singer-songwriter Justin Payne, who will play at the benefit, said he “haunted the place for so long.” That included working there. The benefit is “a special opportunity for many segments of the arts community in BG to rally around…


Recycling efforts grow, but still short in some areas

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   More than 300 local businesses save on garbage pickup costs and conserve landfill space by separating their recyclables from their trash. Businesses from Northwood to North Baltimore use a program operated by Wood Lane’s Community Employment Service, called R&R, to pick up their recyclables. “This is truly intended to be a county-wide program,” said Vic Gable, head of CES. But while the program picks up recyclables for many private businesses, schools and government offices, it collects items from just two apartment complexes in Bowling Green. While the city picks up recyclables at residences, it does not collect them at apartment complexes. During a recent meeting of the Bowling Green City-University Relations Commission, members discussed the lack of recycling at apartment complexes and downtown businesses. Chris Ostrowski, a member of the commission, said he was the first to start apartment recycling in Bowling Green in the 1980s at Summit Terrace, which has 96 units. “We started because it made economic sense,” Ostrowski said. “It was cheaper than having someone pick it up as trash.” Most of the student renters want to recycle, he said. “For the most part, the students see it as a positive thing.” According to Ostrowski, many apartment complexes don’t offer recycling since the owners are responsible for the start-up costs. Unlike other residences, where curbside containers are provided by the city, the apartments would have to purchase the bins. The Wood Lane program partners with the Wood County Solid Waste District to provide recycling containers to school districts throughout the county. The R&R program does not charge for its services, but it does require private businesses to buy their own containers. “One of the challenges with the business community is they have to purchase the containers themselves,” Gable said. “We have to try to break even.” The three trucks used for pickups were purchased with grant funding. Some of the larger corporate customers are Calphalon and Johnson Controls. About 50 small businesses in Bowling Green are involved. But only…


Siblings wear memorial for their father, Glenn Haught, on their skins

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News As a leathersmith, Glenn Haught knew something about needles. Haught, a longtime fixture in Bowling Green where he repaired shoes and leather items of all sorts, died Jan. 27. On Tuesday his daughter, Melissa Marshall and his son, Gerald Haught, got a taste of a different kind of needle when they visited Broad Wing Tattoo in downtown Bowling Green to get matching tattoos to honor their father’s legacy. Marshall credited her brother with the idea. He’s no stranger to the shop nor tattoo artist Jaime Mullholand. She’s worked her craft numerous times on Haught’s arms. The memorial tattoo is his seventh. He has an autobiography in ink on his arms. He already has a tattoo to honor his father, one depicting his signature hat and boots. There’s an image for each of his family members, including his mother, Linda, who assisted her husband with jobs requiring stitching on bags, purses and other items. Marshall does have one tattoo. It dates back before her marriage. Her husband, Jack, is not fond of tattoos. But, she said, he made an exception for the one that will adorn her right ankle. The image replicates the metal silhouette included on the community mural on the corner of East Poe Road and College Street. It shows Glenn Haught at work at his bench. When asked about their father, both Gerald Haught and his sister recall him as a man who worked hard at a job he loved. While known for shoe repair, his craft wasn’t limited to footwear. He repaired hockey gear, the bellows for an antique furnace in Pemberville and the top for the gear shift on a BMW. Though suffering from the leukemia and lymphoma that would claim his life, Glenn Haught still planned to go back to work after the Christmas holiday. Haught, who was born in West Virginia in 1941, never returned to his bench. The family will close the business and sell the equipment. Some pieces of gear, including a 100-year-old sanding and polishing…


Corner Grill plans to reopen

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The owner of the Corner Grill hopes to be back serving burgers within three months. Larry Cain said Wednesday that because of water and smoke damage caused by a fire Monday morning the interior of the eatery will pretty much have to be gutted. He will try to save some signature elements such as the countertops. Still the nostalgic will be the same. Firefighters were called to the grill shortly before 8 a.m. Monday as the crew was preparing to open. Flames shot up from behind a grill as it was heating, and that fire extended into the hood, and from there into an abandoned stairwell next to the building through which the grills ventilated. That structure is owned by Jim Gavarone who operates Mr. Spots next door. The fire also temporarily closed Mr. Spots, but that restaurant is back operating. Cain said because of the damage from the fire that stairwell will now have to be removed. That’s one of the factors that will play into when the Corner Grill is back in operation. The grill itself will get a facelift, and all that work will have to be inspected and approved by the county. “That’s always the biggest thing, making sure things get codified,” Cain said. Much of the work, including getting new equipment, was already planned, but had been put off because of the vagaries of financing and operating a small business. Now that work will be done, and the new Corner Grill will be even better, he said. The owner said he was touched by the support he’s received. Howard Club H, just a couple doors down on North Main Street, will hold a benefit for the Corner Grill Saturday from 2 p.m. until Sunday at 2 a.m. But afterward the club’s patrons will not be able to make their usual stop at the Corner Grill for after-hours sustenance. And the Cookie Jar, around the corner on East Court Street, is also donating a portion of its receipts to help…