Campus

BGSU’s Jonathan Chambers honored for theatrical explorations

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News For Jonathan Chambers, theater is a venture into the unknown. “I’m interested in directing shows I don’t understand,” he said. “I see the creative endeavor of working on a show or writing an essay as the same. … It’s about my coming to a new understanding.” Chambers has taught at Bowling Green State University for 15 years, directing a show a year. They’ve ranged from “Quiet in the Land,” an intense drama about the Amish in World War I, to the giddy musical satire “Urinetown.” So when he started his most recent production “Middletown” in November, it was important for him to take the time to discuss the ideas embedded in the script with his young cast. Chambers doesn’t see a divide between the lecture hall and the stage. “I never found those two endeavors as separate,” he said in a recent interview. “I look for opportunities to spread that point of view to my students. … To me those two endeavors are more linked than separate. The idea of being a scholar artist is one I’ve tried to embrace in my career and, in turn, pass on to my students.” This mix of scholarship, teaching, and mentorship has been recognized by the American Theatre and Drama Society which has awarded Chambers its Betty Jean Jones Award. The award honors Chambers work over the span of a career. Chambers taught at St. Lawrence University in northern New York before coming to BGSU. He moved around when he was young as his father, a Church of Christ minister, moved from church to church. He sent his early years in western Pennsylvania, just outside of Pittsburgh.  He still considers that home. But when he was a teenager his family was “all over the place” – Denver, Spokane, and Lexington, Tennessee. “I was somewhat involved in theater in high school, not deeply involved,” he said. Chambers attended Milligan College in Tennessee, where he majored in English with a minor in voice performance. In 1987 as a senior, he decided to audition for “Children of a Lesser God.” He was cast in the role of Orin. Both he and the show earned regional honors in the Academy College Theater Festival. “That show changed it for me,” Chambers said. “I started to understand the…


BGSU faculty awarded tenure, promoted

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The BGSU Board of Trustees acknowledged and celebrated the accomplishments of faculty from a number of colleges and the University Libraries May 6 with the granting of promotions and for some, tenure. Promotion to full professor Heather Elliott-Famularo, art Dr. Sandra Faulkner, media and communication Dr. Andrew Hershberger, art Dr. Sung-Yeon Park, media and communication Dr. Michael Weber, philosophy Kevin Schempf, music performance studies Dr. Mary Murray, intervention services Dr. Dawn Shinew, teaching and learning Dr. Dafina-Lazarus Stewart, higher education and student affairs Dr. Maureen Wilson, higher education and student affairs Dr. Michael Kimaid, natural and social sciences, BGSU Firelands Dr. Cynthia Miglietti, applied sciences, BGSU Firelands Dr. Philip Weinsier, applied sciences, BGSU Firelands Tenure Eileen Kuan-Veng Bosch, library teaching and learning Tenure and Promotion to Associate Professor Dr. Russell Mills, political science Dr. Kevin Vallier, philosophy Dr. Jeffrey Meyer, marketing Dr. Katherine Meizel, musicology/composition/theory Dr. Elizabeth Menard, music education Dr. Arne Spohr, musicology/composition/theory Dr. Fei Gao, visual communication and technology education Dr. Jonathan Bostic, teaching and learning Dr. Angela Thomas, teaching and learning Dr. Brooks Vostal, intervention services Dr. Theodore Bach, humanities, BGSU Firelands Dr. Sue Ellen McComas, humanities, BGSU Firelands Dr. Raymond Schuck, humanities, BGSU Firelands Dr. Stephanie Walls, natural and social sciences, BGSU Firelands Elizabeth Hertenstein, collections and technical services, University Libraries Promotion to Senior Lecturer Ruthy Light, art Catherine Smith, engineering technologies Martin Anderson, applied sciences, BGSU Firelands Rachelle Hippler, applied sciences, BGSU Firelands William Huepenbecker, natural and social sciences, BGSU Firelands Alyson Wilson, natural and social sciences, BGSU Firelands Promotion to Lecturer Spintz Harrison, cultural and critical studies Amy Wagner, natural and social sciences, BGSU Firelands Dr. Margaret Adams, human services Staci Freeworth, public and allied health Laura Schrock, communication sciences and disorders


New music lovers to stage gathering at BGSU next spring

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bowling Green State University will host a new music lovefest a year from now. On Thursday, the New Music Gathering announced it would hold its 2017 event on the BGSU campus, May 11-13. The gathering is expected to attract as many as 500 new music lovers, said Kurt Doles, the director of the MidAmerican Center for Contemporary Music, which is housed in the College of Musical Arts. Among the performances, talks, panel discussions, will be speed dating for performers and composers. The event is described on the website as “an annual three-day conference dedicated to the performance, production, promotion, support and creation of new concert music.” The gathering “aims to be both a conference in the traditional sense but also quite literally a collective place for things to grow, improve, solidify and above all get personal.” Doles attended the first New Music Gathering two years ago hosted by the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. “I decided within the first 12 hours I was there that we had to do it . … I doggedly pursued it.” First he needed to secure cooperation from officials at the College of Musical Arts, and then show  the organizers that Bowling Green, set among the farm fields of Northwest Ohio, could handle being host. “It took a little bit of convincing on my part,” Doles said. The first two gatherings were held in San Francisco and Baltimore, and organizers were “leaning toward” putting them in another urban center, Doles said. But he was able to assure them that BGSU had the facilities, and he had the experience from the university’s own New Music Festival held each October, to handle the event. “That we were able to secure this says something about Bowling Green as a new music center,” he said. BGSU will handle all the logistics for the event, while the gathering’s team will handle all the programming. The featured guest artist will be percussionist, conductor and author Steven Schick. He is music director of the La Jolla Symphony and Chorus and artistic director of the San Francisco Contemporary Music Players. Over the past 40 years, he commissioned or premiered more than 150 new works. Other performers have been booked, Doles said, but not yet announced. He said the gathering is called an…


BGSU honors top classified staff

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Like a well-oiled machine, Barbara Berta, Mary Busdeker and Marcia Seubert keep the Department of Mathematics and Statistics running smoothly. This is good news for students and faculty in the best of times, but especially impressive during times of great transition, as the last two years have been for the department. In recognition of their achievement and the graciousness with which they go above and beyond their official duties, the three were presented the Classified Staff Team Award on May 18 at the annual Classified Staff Council reception and awards ceremony. The team will share a $1,500 award and their names will be displayed on a commemorative plaque in the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. “The Department of Mathematics and Statistics has had three chairs in the last two years,” said Dr. Hanfeng Chen, current chair of the department, in nominating the team. “Furthermore, we have had a change in three out of the main leadership positions within the last year.” Although this caused an inordinate amount of work for Berta, Busdeker and Seubert, they handled it “with professionalism, patience and promptness,” Chen said. “They never missed a beat and basically ran the department during the transition period of leaderships.” “Their support during this time ensured a seamless transition for faculty, but more importantly, for the graduate students and the many undergraduate students that come into contact with our office each day,” wrote faculty member Barbara Zirkes. Calling them the “heart and soul of the department,” Chen said they not only keep things moving, they also create an atmosphere that promotes collaboration and learning. Berta, an administrative assistant, has a key role in creating the class schedule and making sure there are ample opportunities for all the students who wish to enroll and that they have an appropriate learning space, “which is an enormous undertaking since we offer so many different course sections,” said Dr. Craig Zirbel, graduate coordinator. She also facilitates communication among the department and keeps the calendar of events organized, among her myriad duties. “Barb is utterly competent in everything she does,” Zirbel said. Seubert has served the department for many years, currently as senior secretary for the graduate program. She works with graduate students from their first inquiry through graduation. She is “extremely detail oriented” and…


BGSU bestows emeritus status on retiring faculty

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS The Bowling Green State University Board of Trustees granted emeritus status to 15 retired or retiring faculty members during the May 6 meeting. Emeritus status is conferred in recognition of distinguished service to the University. To be designated as emeritus, individuals must have been at the University for at least 10 years and been recommended by their department for the designation. Emerita Lecturer, humanities Patricia Antonelli, assistant librarian at BGSU Firelands and a faculty member in the humanities department, joined the Firelands staff in 1996 and retired May 6. She brought new courses and library research instruction to students. She was actively involved in the transition to OhioLINK, and maintained strong ties to faculty in the Jerome Library on the Bowling Green campus. In the latter part of her tenure, she served as interim director of the library, a role in which she further strengthened its holdings and links to Jerome as well as services to students. Emerita Senior Lecturer, applied sciences Mona Burke will retire June 1 after serving as the health information management technology program director in the BGSU Firelands applied sciences department for over 30 years. Recognized many times for her excellence in teaching, she received the Distinguished Teacher Award in 1995. Burke was one of the first faculty at BGSU to offer online courses. A nationally recognized expert in her field, in 2010 she was named a fellow of the American Health Information Management Association. Emerita Associate Professor, journalism and public relations Dr. Nancy Brendlinger, who will retire June 1, has served as a faculty member in journalism and public relations since 1990. Known as an engaged teacher and mentor, she incorporated what she learned from her two Fulbright teaching/scholarship experiences and two BGSU faculty leaves to other countries into her teaching, expanding students’ horizons regarding international issues and relationships. She began as an assistant professor in charge of the magazine sequence and in 1995 became the first woman to chair the Department of Journalism, a position she held two more times. She was active in leading curriculum changes and in enlarging the then-School of Mass Communication into the current School of Media and Communication. Emeritus Professor, music performance studies Christopher Buzzelli retired in 2015. A specialist in jazz and jazz guitar, he joined the music…


Moosbrugger comes home to roost as new Falcon athletic director

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bob Moosbrugger knew what he wanted in a career when he was a student at Bowling Green State University. He wanted to be an athletic director. He wanted it so much that after two years playing baseball, and winning the award as the top freshman, he decided he needed to concentrate on his studies. He left the team. On Tuesday, Moosbrugger became an athletic director, and he was returning to the Falcon roost to realize that goal. BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey introduced the 1994 graduate as the university’s new athletic director. He’ll start on July 18. The announcement comes just five weeks after Chris Kingston announced he was leaving to go into the private sector. “It was quick. It was fast,” Moosbrugger said. “It’s been a whirlwind tour.” Mazey said that the search was conducted by Turnkey Search. She said she learned that when an athletic director position opens up, a lot of people are interested. That one of those was a BGSU graduate was a plus. “It’s always great to bring a Falcon home and into the Falcon family.” Mazey noted as a former athlete, Moosbrugger “knows that role of student athlete and how important that is to this university. … I was impressed by his passion for his alma mater.” She said at previous institutions, she has worked with athletic directors who were graduates of those schools and found them to be effective at working with the entire university community from students to alumni. “They were very, very good fundraisers.” “It’s truly a great day to be a Falcon,” Moosbrugger told those gathered for the press conference in the Stroh Center. “I’m coming home.” Moosbrugger, a Celina High School graduate, has been the assistant director of athletics/chief operating officer at San Diego State. He rose to that position having started there in 2000 as the assistant director for the Aztec Athletic Foundation. He emphasized that the story BGSU has to tell goes beyond wins and losses. “We have great student athletes who are developing academically and socially.” He noted that BGSU student athletes have an average GPA of 3.2. BGSU, though, is not alone in having student athletes, or even coaches, whose story gets told in the pages of the police blotter. “It happens everywhere,” he…


BGSU taps alum Moosbrugger as AD

Bowling Green State University will hire Bob Moosbrugger, a 1994 BGSU graduate, as its new athletic director. The university will hold a news conference today (May 17) to make the formal announcement. Moosbrugger is deputy director of athletics and chief operating officer at San Diego State University where he’s been since 2000. He played baseball at BGSU. He is a graduate of Celina High School. Moosbrugger takes over for Chris Kingston who left the position in April.


Gish Theater, Hanna Hall should be preserved

Professors emeriti Wally and Diane Pretzer argue for preserving Hanna Hall & Gish Film Theater. Is history important? We think that it is. The current BGSU administration, headed by President Mary Ellen Mazey, apparently does not think so. Some of us objected,a few years ago, to the demolition of the unique house on the corner of East Wooster and South College, built from a Montgomery Ward kit, which had served the Department of Popular Culture for a number of years. President Mazey takes great pride in the Health Center now located there; it could have been constructed elsewhere on campus. But, when the current administration dictates, the Board of Trustees falls into submission. Progress is, of course, important; however, when it thoughtlessly pushes history aside, one can become discouraged. What has, we think, become an egregious dismissal of history is the eventual planned demolition of a gem — namely the Gish Film Theater in Hanna Hall. This gem encompasses not only the theater itself (formerly 105 Hanna Hall) but also the accompanying gallery of memorabilia honoring the Gish sisters’ achievements, and the Ralph Wolfe Viewing Center. It is certainly possible that Dean Ray Braun of the College of Business Administration, which is scheduled to take over a remodeled Hanna Hall, could approve of keeping the Gish complex in its current location as a treasure in shared space. It is also possible that the College of Business Administration could happily occupy a building elsewhere on campus, leaving the most traditional BGSU buildings, Hanna, University, and Moseley Halls, retaining their focus on the arts and sciences. The current university administration’s focus is clearly only on business; might President Mazey want neon lights along East Wooster to point out the relocated College of Business Administration, thus diminishing the importance of the arts and sciences? It would be helpful, we hope, if others would speak for and write about preserving the Gish Film Theater and its related aspects in their present location. Make an appointment to talk with President Mazey and/or Provost Rodney Rogers, or send an e-mail, or write a letter in support of this preservation. Wally and Diane Pretzer Bowling Green


Summit brings women in philanthropy into focus

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Learning how to manage money and learning the value of sharing that wealth with others go helping hand in helping hand. For the past 15 years, Auburn University’s Women’s Philanthropy Board has entwined those lessons in programs geared toward elementary school students through adults. Bringing those values together is essential, said Sidney James Nakhjavan, the executive director for the Cary Center for the Advancement of Philanthropy and Nonprofit Studies at Auburn. She was the keynote speaker at the Women in Philanthropy Summit Saturday at Bowling Green State University. The summit was convened by the presidents of BGSU, Otterbein University and the University of Findlay. “When you talk in terms of money management, you talk in terms of one thing,” Nakhjavan told those in attendance. “When you talk in terms of philanthropy and building a legacy, you certainly are talking about one thing. When you blend it then you get this powerful force that really effects change within people. …  It becomes this burning passion.” While teaching money management may seem fairly dispassionate, said Nakhjavan every semester she gets “criers.” One male student became apoplectic in a session talking about money management. He was angry because he didn’t realize how much debt he was taking on. He didn’t know what an IRA or a 401K was. He’s not alone. One young woman told Nakhjavan that when she saw 401K on the syllabus, she thought she was going to have to run a race. Another thought United Way was an airline. “They end up being grateful to learn this stuff and empowered to build their legacy,” the speaker said. Since 2001, the efforts, started as Women’s Board for Philanthropy, have been working to increase that learning curve. Seminars for women, started with 100 attendees, have grown to attract 1,000 attendees. The formation of the board was prescient. In 2001 Dean June Henton, of the College of Human Sciences, with colleagues and a donor, attended a conference with the intention of finding how to cultivate a culture of philanthropy among women on the Auburn campus. “What prompted that,” Nakhjavan said, “was the then emerging societal trend that women would be the predominant wealth holders in this country, and therefore the world. With that power of the purse, women would have more influence.”…


Art community strives to keep painter Bob Mazur’s legacy alive

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Bob Mazur’s spirit has returned to Bowling Green State University’s Bryan Gallery. A dozen of his paintings as well as prints of his work are hanging on the walls in preparation for a celebration of his life at noon on Saturday.  Mazur, who taught at BGSU for 33 years before retiring in 1998, died in August, 2015. The paintings are vibrant with splashes of color, especially blue. Mazur dove deep to find them. He snapped underwater photographs that inspired the thick lines and designs of his abstract paintings. He applied thick layers of paint that even years later still seems in motion. They possess a muscularity one would expect from a former wrestler. “You can see his big, bold personality in his paintings,” said Charlie Kanwischer, who started teaching at the university a year before Mazur retired. He was “a guy who liked to have a good time.” Kanwischer said Mazur was always positive and upbeat with friends and students. The exhibit is more than a display of his talents; the show is intended as a continuing effort to continue his legacy. Working with Laura Jajko, president of American Frame, friends, family and colleagues have been working to endow a scholarship in his honor. All 12 paintings and the glicee prints on display, Kanwischer said, are for sale. Those visiting will also be able to order a book of Mazur’s work. Or they can write a check to the BGSU Foundation. “This is about Bob’s legacy and passing it down for generations,” he said. Mazur, Kanwischer said, was one of a generation of artists who took the School of Art to greater prominence. Professors such as David Cayton, Ron Jacomini, who designed the book, and Tom Hilty all “dedicated their lives to the place.” Mazur’s widow, Lynne Mazur, told Kanwischer that over his career her husband painted more than 1,000 works. The 12 in the show are the last she has to sell. Already the scholarship fund has generated $28,000. About $25,000 is what’s required to fund the scholarship. The scholarship, Kanwischer said, will be for a student already enrolled in the School of Art and will be for one year. The family, he said, has provided important support in creating the memorial for Mazur. Kanwischer said that Jajko…


What’s in a name? Large donations, BGSU hopes

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Still in its early, quiet stages, the current Bowling Green State University Capital Campaign has already met with success. BGSU President Mary Ellen Mazey told trustees last week that the campaign has raised $72 million of a $200 million goal. Last year Shea McGrew, the vice president for University Advancement and president and chief executive officer of the BGSU Foundation, described that as a working goal. The campaign was first announced in spring, 2014, and is expected to run for six years. On Friday, the trustees heard what the deans and other top university officials envision as the ways that money would be spent. Not surprisingly the plans offer donors plenty of chances to put their names on something, whether a building, program or professorship. In at least one case, though, a funded position would be named for the current occupant. Sara Bushong, dean of libraries, said one of the capital campaign priorities was to get funding to name a position for Bill Schurk, the sound recording archivist. Schurk begins his 50th year of service in July. Bushong also said that the library would like to have a visiting professorship named after pop culture pioneer Ray Browne, who planted the flag of the then-new discipline at BGSU. Each endowed professorship would cost $300,000. The priorities represent more than a wish list; they offer a look at the direction the university is heading. Health and Human Services Dean Mary Huff stated that the college would look to attracting funding for five named professorships, in several disciplines. This would require $300,000 to $1.5 million. She said that additional money for recruiting faculty is necessary because of the competition for top candidates. The Optimal Aging Institute will be a prime focus. A search for a director is underway with a hire expected this summer. Huff said she hoped a donor would could be found to sponsor the center. The project was launched in March with a $1 million donation from Medical Mutual. Another area where the college wants to boost its research, training and outreach is forensics. She also would like to establish new scholarships. These would help the college attract an ethnically diverse student body that “reflects the communities they will serve.” Arts & Sciences Dean Ray Craig said creating 340…


Two BGSU football coaching staff cited for assault after bar fight, one put on leave

By JAN LARSON McLAUGHLIN BG Independent News   Two Bowling Green State University football coaching staff members were cited for assault over the weekend after getting into a bar brawl when they reportedly refused to leave at closing time. As a result, one of the coaches has been placed on administrative leave. Marcus White, 34, from Alabama, and Kenneth Williams II, 23, from Texas, were cited after the staff at Liquid bar, 238 N. Main St., called Bowling Green police for help Sunday at 2:22 a.m. According to BG Police Major Justin White, the report from the incident said Marcus White and Williams were reportedly refusing to leave the bar at closing time, so the bar staff attempted to escort them out. “They became belligerent with bar staff,” Justin White said. Marcus White allegedly punched one employee in the face, breaking his glasses. Williams reportedly punched another employee twice in the face, busting his lip. Marcus White reportedly told police that he felt the bar staff was being aggressive and wasn’t giving him enough time to leave the bar. Neither he nor Williams were taken to jail. Marcus White is the football co-defensive coordinator, and Williams is a graduate assistant football offense coach. Two other members of the BGSU football coaching staff were also present at the incident, but reportedly did not get involved in the fight. Nicholas Young, a football recruiting coordinator, did have a split lip, but said he was unsure how it occurred. Eddie Benavidez, a graduate assistant defense coach, was also present but not involved in the altercation, according to the police report. When contacted about the incident, Bowling Green State University officials released the following statement. “Bowling Green State University has high expectations for its employees, at work, and in the community. We are aware of the weekend incident involving Department of Athletics staff and are reviewing the facts. Pending the outcome of our investigation, coach Marcus White has been placed on administrative leave. Graduate Assistant Kenneth Williams is a student and will be treated accordingly.” When asked for more specifics about Williams, BGSU spokesperson Dave Kielmeyer said Williams will be going through the BGSU student conduct process and may be held accountable under the code of student conduct.  


From suits to nuts, BGSU project puts students’ refuse to good use (updated)

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The Harshman Community Room has everything needed to equip a college student, lots of everything needed. Books, planners, printer paper are here. Cardboard crates overflow with boxes of mac and cheese, ramen noodles and Pop Tarts of all varieties. Clothes, from coats to undies, suitable for all occasions from a session in a gym to a special date or a job interview, are piled and hung around the room. Falcon spirit wear gets its own stack. Want to see how you look? There’s about 30 mirrors. Mini-fridges and microwaves are stacked on a table, and a few computers, albeit of questionable operating status, are nearby. Off in one corner is the furniture, and shoes take up an entire room size space. Welcome to the sorting operation for Bowling Green State University’s Move Out, Don’t Throw It Out project. Now in its 15th year, the drive encourages students to donate whatever they don’t want that may be usable to the drive. Boxes are located throughout campus, in dorms, at convenience stores, in the student union. It’s a form of “passive community service,” Hennessy said. The organizers will try to find new homes for their castoff goods. “Somebody’s future treasures,” said Torrance Vaughn, a student volunteer sorting through a bag of clothing. “Somebody will have a use for it.” The idea is to promote reuse and waste reduction, said Nick Hennessy, director of the BGSU Office of Campus Sustainability. On Monday with the students gone, he and Carina Weed, the intern who organized the event, and a group of student volunteers, were sorting through what was left behind. Last year, Hennessy said, the drive collected almost nine tons of material, and he wasn’t sure if that included the food. All that otherwise most likely would have gone to the landfill. “I would like to think not, but I don’t know where else it would end up.” He added: “What gets really overwhelming when you multiply that by every university. The landfills must just swell this time of year with all this stuff.” Already the tables groan with the plenty of hand-me-downs. All are carefully sorted. “We try to get as specific as possible because that helps with the final dispensation of it,” Hennessy said. Some items are of questionable use. A…


BGSU faculty among Ohio arts award winners

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Three members of the Bowling Green State University faculty have received $5,000 Ohio Excellence Awards from the Ohio Arts Council. The awards are recognition by the artists’ peers for a body of work. Among this year’s recipients are writers Theresa Williams and Lawrence Coates, both of whom teach in the Creative Writing program, and composer Mikel Kuehn, of the College of Musical Arts. Coates, who has received recognition for his novels set in his native northern California, said it was good to receive recognition from Ohio, where he has lived and taught for 15 years. While his novels are most often set in the past and focus on the history of California, his stories often have Ohio locales. One, “Bats,” a piece of flash fiction, won the 2013 Barthelme Award. “People really seem to like the stories I set in Ohio,” he said. He included a few of those in his application. Still “when I write novels I tend to go back to where I feel home is,” he said. “As a teacher as well as a writer I hope to inspire my students to write great fiction set in Ohio,” he said “I hope my students take on that work.” Coates said he plans to use some of the grant to finance the research on forthcoming projects, including a novel set in the years after the Gold Rush. He has to travel to archives to find some of the material he needs. “Not everything is on the internet,” he said. Williams said she will spend her grant on needs closer at hand – both her computer and phone need to be upgraded. The 10-year-old computer, she noted, still has an XP operating system, and she uses the phone as part of her writing process. Williams said she is in the midst of writing a graphic novel and is “in sore need of art supplies.” Williams has developed and is teaching a workshop on the graphic novel at BGSU. “The graphic novel is opening up doors of my imagination that have never been open before,” she said. She doesn’t expect the novel to be finished at least for two years. It is a blend of the real and supernatural, with ghosts and preachers involved. As a writer, Williams, who…


BGSU grad speakers tell of different paths to success

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Speaking at Commencement ceremonies Saturday morning at Bowling Green State University, ESPN personality Jay Crawford remembered his first college class. It was a speech course that met in South Hall in 1983, and as an exercise the professor asked them to tell the class what they hoped to achieve. The freshman from Sandusky said: “I’m here to be a television sports anchor.” “I had no idea how crazy that sounded, and I’m glad I didn’t,” he told the graduates from the College of Arts and Science. “I heard the chuckles in the back of the room, but I didn’t listen to them.” He cautioned the graduates that for every friend and family member who supports them there will be “many more who will stand between you and what you dream of and what you want the most. Hear those voices but let them fuel you.” So the kid from Sandusky persisted. Armed with a degree in radio, television and film, he went into broadcast. Now the 1987 graduate is at the top of his field as co-host for the midday edition of ESPN’s flagship program “Sports Center.” Crawford has “wildly exceeded the dreams” he had that first day in class at BGSU, he said. Honorary doctoral degree recipient Maribeth Rahe, president and chief executive officer of Fort Washington Investment Advisors, took a less direct route to success. “Career paths are not linear,” she told the graduates. Her mother urged her to go to college to pursue the opportunities denied women of older generations. She graduated in 1970 with a BA in Spanish with a minor in business. She only came to BGSU after first attending Miami University. Rahe’s career sights were not as precisely set as Crawford’s. She wanted to learn Spanish, study abroad and be active on campus. At Miami, she found her choices to study abroad limited. Her sister’s BGSU roommate, though, told her she could study abroad for a full year in Madrid. She transferred and at BGSU got the grounding she needed to pursue a career in finance. “If you like what you do, it does show up in your work and life,” Rahe said. “and if you don’t, seek out another opportunity. … Do not settle for something expedient or what someone else thinks…