Arts and Entertainment

3B’s “Young Frankenstein” laughs off Halloween spooks

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News   Get a jump on Halloween with shrieks of laughter rather than shrieks of fear. The folks at 3B Productions will present the musical stage version of Mel Brooks’ “Young Frankenstein” this weekend with shows Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and a Sunday matinee at 2:30 at the Maumee Indoor Theater, 601 Conant St., Maumee. Joe Barton, the show’s director and a founder of the troupe, said the inspiration to stage this Mel Brooks classic came from last fall’s Halloween-themed show, “The Addams Family.” Seeing Randy “Beef” Baughman as Lurch, he and others thought he’d make a great Frankenstein’s monster. Perfect casting, aside from the challenge of finding a tux that fits him. In “Young Frankenstein,” Mel Brooks imagined Frederick Frankenstein following in his grandfather Victor’s footsteps and creating a monster of his own. Brooks, as was his wont, turned the horror of the original and its multiple retellings, on its head and into a relentless comedy. “There’s not sad moment in the show,” Barton said. “Even the love songs are comedic.” Baughman’s son, Will, was cast as Frederick. They’ve shared the stage before, most recently in a very different seasonal musical. In spring Will Baughman played Jesus in “Jesus Christ Superstar” while Randy Baughman played the high-strutting high priest Caiaphas . “Young Frankenstein,” Barton said, gives the younger Baughman a chance to play a lighter, comic role. “It’s fun to watch them work together,” the director said of the father-son duo. With Janine Baughman, Randy’s wife and Will’s mother, as musical director the show as much a family affair for the Baughman’s as it is for the Frankenstein’s. Brooks did a seamless translation of his hit movie to the stage, adding a few musical numbers. Usually when doing a show that has a movie version, Barton advises against watching the film. Actors can pick up the tics of the screen performers. But in this case he told them to go ahead…


Face It exhibit at BGSU takes intimate look at portrait photography

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News   Photographic portraits have always had their allure. Think of those ghostly images staring back at you from 19th century daguerreotypes. Viewers will find the contemporary descendants of those models in Face It: Reimagining Contemporary Portraits now on exhibit at the Bryan Gallery in the Fine Arts Building on the Bowling Green State University campus. Recently this reporter was treated to a tour of the show accompanied by the three curators and two photographers who have work in the exhibit. The seed for Face It was planted with a passing remark by Jacqui Nathan, the gallery director, to Lynn Whitney, who teaches photography at BGSU. How about a portrait show? Nathan asked. That casual suggestion took a couple years to gestate, but with the help of art historian Andrew Hershberger it has now come to fruition. Photo portraits are “very common,” he said, “Very familiar.” We carry them around with us in our wallets, on our telephones. We have identification cards with portraits on them. And we treasure them. In the event of a disaster, after family and pets are safe, people will grab the family portraits. “Arguably this is most common type of photography ever,” he said. “Yet they remain mysterious.” Back in the days of daguerreotypes, “people were frightened of these portraits,” Hershberger said. “The kind of impact portraits can have is pretty dramatic.” That pull is evident in Face It, whether it is the tightly cropped images of photographer Nicholas Nixon and his wife, who in a couple images peers surreptitiously out at the viewer or Greg Miller’s photos of children waiting for the school bus in Connecticut. Those photos were taken near Sandy Hook not long after the horrific school shooting there. Hershberger quotes Miller as saying: “How can anyone not see children, all children, as their own, as nieces and nephews, or even as themselves?” In putting together the show, the curators drew mostly on contemporary works with a…


GRÜBS ready to unveil new recording

From GRÜBS The Grande Royale Ükulelists of the Black Swamp, a.k.a. the GRÜBS, will celebrate the release of their new CD if you think that way on Tuesday, October 4, at Grounds for Thought coffeehouse, 174 S. Main St. in Bowling Green, from 7:30 to 9:00 pm. The band will play some of their tunes and CDs will be available for purchase and autographs. The quartet of ükulele players and vocalists are Sheri Wells-Jensen, Jason Wells-Jensen, Anne Kidder, and Geoff Howes. “If you think that way”includes five original songs and seven cover versions ranging from folk (John Prine’s “Paradise”) to 1920s musical (Brecht and Weill’s “Mack the Knife,” sung in German) to classical (Pachelbel’s Canon in D, but done in C) to rock (Chicago’s “25 or 6 to 4”). Recording and releasing “if you think that way”  has involved the talents of many collaborators, most of them local: The CD was recorded at Stone Soup Recording Studios in Maumee by Eric Sills, who also assisted the group with production and arrangements. A guest artist, Dave Fogle of Perrysburg, who runs Dave’s Drum Depot in Toledo, sat in on drums for the original song “Sweet Rebecca.” The cover photograph and album design are by Ashley Donaldson of Findlay. Kate Kamphuis of Bowling Green contributed additional photography. Phil Klum of Phillip Klum Mastering in New York City mastered the recording. For the past three and a half years, the GRÜBS have been entertaining in Northwest Ohio, performing at the Black Swamp Arts Festival, the Downtown BG Art Walk, the BG Farmer’s Market, the Stones Throw Tavern, the Hump Day Revue, Coffee Amici in Findlay, the Sunset Bistro, Leisure Time Winery in Napoleon, National Train Day in Toledo, the Relay for Life, Rhythm on the River in Grand Rapids, the Ohio Chautauqua in Rossford, the Wood County District Public Library, the Wood County Historical Museum, Fremont’s Got Talent, on WTOL Channel 11 and Fox Toledo’s “Daybreak,” on WBGU televsion and WBGU-FM radio, and at…


Carl Allen spreads the love of jazz in Bowling Green

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Jazz drummer and producer Carl Allen told some of those war stories young jazz payers love to hear during his visit to Bowling Green State University. Anecdotes about being in the studio with their musical heroes. About being back stage with a legend like Art Blakey – and getting a life lesson. And the students came ready to play for him, so he could share some of the knowledge he’s accumulated over the years. On Thursday night those in the two big bands, even got the chance to perform with his inimitable beat getting them in the groove. But the stories, the notes, even the groove, was not the main lesson Allen had to share “It’s about love,” he told the students. That’s what he and all the other visiting artists who come to campus are about, the musician said. They love the music, and they want to share that love with students. Whatever criticism he had of their playing, he told those in a master class for jazz combos, was delivered in that spirit. The same spirit in which Blakey brought him up short when Allen was 23 and complained about a drum set provided on a gig. “Do you play the drums or do the drums play you?” Blakey, who’d used the same set, asked him. The way the young musicians can reciprocate is by asking questions. That’s what Allen did when he first arrived on the scene in New York while still a student at William Patterson College in New Jersey. An older drummer told him they let him into the fraternity of jazz drummers because he clearly loved the music. He showed it by being a pest. He constantly asked questions of drumming greats like Philly Joe Jones and Max Roach. He urged students to have that same kind of curiosity. Allen has been on campus since Thursday. In addition to his work in campus, he stopped by the high…


BGSU Lively Arts through Oct. 5

Through Sept. 28 — The 33rd annual juried exhibition of Ohio designer craftsmen continues in the Willard Wankelman Gallery in BGSU’s Fine Arts Center. The exhibit showcases works in clay, glass, fiber, wood, metal and mixed media by many nationally recognized Ohio artists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free Through Oct. 6 — “Face It: Reimagining Contemporary Portraits” continues in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery in the BGSU Fine Arts Center. “Face It” explores an expanded definition of photographic portraiture. Curated by BGSU art faculty Lynn Whitney and Andrew Hershberger and BGSU Galleries Director Jacqueline Nathan, the exhibit features photos by 27 renowned artists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays. Free Sept. 21 – The BGSU Faculty Artist Series features pianist Cole Burger in recital at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 22 – Creative writing students in BGSU’s Master of Fine Arts program read from their work beginning at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Sept. 22 – BGSU The International Film Series features the 2010 Guatemalan film “AbUSed: The Postville Raid,” directed by Luis Argueta. The film conveys personal stories from a small Iowa town that witnessed the May 2008 mass arrest of 400 immigrants at a meatpacking plant. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater in Hanna Hall. Free Sept. 22 – The BGSU Guest Artist Series puts a spotlight on jazz with Carl Allen on percussion. In addition to his work as a drummer, sideman, bandleader, entrepreneur and educator, Allen has more than 200 recordings to his name. His performance begins at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 22 – Elsewhere productions begins the season with “Spineless: A Staged Reading” written by Elise Lockwood…


Poetry & art all have part in composer Elainie Lillios’ music

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Elainie Lillios’ music emerges from a web of relationships. The composer works closely with the musicians as she’s writing. She meets with the poet whose work inspires her. She reaches beyond music to poetry and art to construct her pieces that merge electronics and acoustic sounds. All those elements are in play as the Bowling Green State University professor of composition works on her newest piece. “Hazy Moonlight” is being funded by a prestigious Barlow Endowment Commission for Music. Lillios had already been discussing composing a piece for the duo of percussionist Stuart Gerber and saxophonist Jan Berry Baker before the Barlow Commission. In fact, it was the performers who suggested she apply. Lillios was one of 12 recipients out of 150 applicants. Lillios had visited them in Atlanta where they were playing on a streetcar during a festival. That’s part of what impressed the composer about the performers. “Just because music is difficult doesn’t mean it can’t be shared with the community,” she said. “They are very committed to this idea of getting music outside buildings, outside the academy, into places new music necessarily doesn’t happen. … They are really fearless performers. They want to engage with the community.” Lillios engages the performers from the very beginning of the composition process. “I like to be in a relationship with the people with whom I work. I’m not the kind of composer who goes into my room and spends six months there to write a piece and says ‘here it is’ without having any collaboration during the process.” Lillios wants them to feel “like they’ve been part of the piece from the very beginning.” Lillios wants to know who the performers’ favorite composers are, particular techniques they like or don’t like, how the piece will fit into their repertoire. The discussions include logistics as well. What instruments can the percussionist expect to have available while on tour? Lillios already has decided the piece will…


Roger Schupp’s legacy celebrated in memorial concert, Sept. 25

Percussionists at Bowling Green State University will beat their drums in memory of Roger Schupp Sunday, Sept.25 at 3 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall in the Moore Musical Arts Center on campus. Schupp, who taught percussion and jazz at BGSU for almost 25 years, died Dec. 15 at 55. He continued teaching up until a few days before his passing from cancer. The concert will feature performances by his students and colleagues, as well as internationally renowned jazz drummer Carl Allen. Allen will perform Thad Jones’ “Groove Merchant” with the Jazz Lab Band I. Speaking about Schupp and his legacy will be his widow, Tracy Schupp, long-time colleague Jeff Halsey and former student and owner of Black Swamp percussion Eric Sooy. Former student and colleague Olman Piedra will also participate as a special guest. The program will reflect the range of Schupp’s interests and influence. That includes a performance by the faculty jazz ensemble with Halsey, bass, David Bixler, alto saxophone, Isabelle Huang, marimba, Ariel Kasler, guitar, Daniel Piccolo, drums and cymbals, and Charles Saenz, trumpet. Schupp was the drummer for the group throughout his time at BGSU and organized its weekly sessions in downtown Bowling Green venues. Also performing will be a marimba quartet of his students from his last semester, the BGSU Percussion Ensemble, and the Afro-Caribbean Ensemble. A reception will follow the memorial concert. The Missouri native was a versatile performer in the areas of classical, jazz, and world music.  Schupp performed in a variety of ensembles including the Toledo and Austin symphonies, the Kansas City Civic Orchestra, and Austin Jazz Orchestra. He was a member of the Toledo Symphony Percussion Trio, Toledo Symphony Concert Band, and Toledo Jazz Orchestra. Schupp performed on recordings with the Hawk-Richard Jazz Orchestra, the Toledo Jazz Orchestra, the BGSU Jazz Faculty Ensemble and guitarist Chris Buzzelli as well as on recordings of works by composers Samuel Adler, Michael Daugherty, and Shane Hoose. He also performed and recorded with such diverse artists…


Theatergoers will lap up Players’ off-beat dog story “Sylvia”

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News In “Sylvia,” one character warns another that if you give a dog a woman’s name you soon start thinking of the dog as a woman. Well, if you cast a fine comic actress as a dog, believe me you will start thinking of her as a dog, a lovable, neurotic, rambunctious, affectionate, and always entertaining dog. With Traci Johnson playing the title dog in A.R. Gurney’s comedy, the Black Swamp Players have done just that. “Sylvia” opens Friday at 8 p.m. in the First United Methodist Church, 1526 E. Wooster, Bowling Green. The comedy continues its run Saturday, Sept. 16, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, Sept. 17, at 2 p.m. and next weekend Sept. 23 and 24 at 8 p.m. and Sept. 25 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $12 and $10 for seniors and students from Grounds for Thought or by visiting www.blackswampplayer.org. The adult comedy, directed by Wayne Weber, is one of Gurney’s explorations of white, upper middle class angst. Greg (Ryan Albrecht) and Kate (Stephanie Truman) are empty nesters in the 1990s who have moved into New York City from the suburbs, and they are experiencing just the city life they were seeking… dinner parties, chamber music concerts, Knicks games. After raising their two children, now away at college, Kate has a blossoming career in education. Her mission is to bring Shakespeare to inner city junior high students. She’s earnest and devoted to her new endeavor. Greg, on the other hand, is at a dead end with his job, which somehow involves money markets. Sort of a vague sitcom dad kind of employment. After another argument with his boss, he flees work for the park. That’s where he meets Sylvia. It’s love at first sight. The play opens with them coming into the apartment for the first time. Other than a collar, there’s little to tell the audience that Johnson is playing a dog. You don’t need to be told. Her high energy…


BGSU Lively Arts through Sept. 28

Sept. 14 – The Faculty Artist Series features Caroline Chin, assistant professor of violin. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 15 – BGSU’s creative writing MFA students present their work. Their reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Sept 16 – The first ARTalk of the season features Joshua Kosker, a visiting professor of art in jewelry and metals from Indiana University. Kosker’s work is rooted in contemporary craft and body adornment. His talk will begin at 5:30 p.m. in 204 Fine Arts Center. A reception will follow in the Willard Wankelman Gallery. Free Sept 16 – EAR l EYE: Listening and Looking: Contemporary Music and Art features BGSU doctoral candidates from the College of Musical Arts responding to works of art. The event begins at 7 p.m. at the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St., Toledo. Free Sept. 18 – The Sunday Matinee Series continues at 3 p.m. with two 1919 films, “The Breath of a Nation,” directed by Gregory La Cava, followed by “The Greatest Question,” directed by D.W. Griffith, with Lillian Gish and Robert Harron. In 1919 Griffith was in top form, this being a year of the masterworks “Broken Blossoms” and “True Heart Susie.” However, no less inspired is the gorgeously photographed “The Greatest Question” (by Billy Bitzer, cameraman on all the Griffith features that incredibly busy year). Somehow it has been mysteriously overlooked, yet is no less fascinating and no less a worthy role for the extraordinary, resilient, ageless Lillian Gish. Free Sept. 18 – Celebrate the history and the future of the Bryan Recital Hall, which has undergone major renovations in the last year, including completely new seating, acoustics and lighting. A rededication concert will be held at 3 p.m. in the hall, located at the Moore Musical Arts Center. For details, see: http://bgindependentmedia.org/bryan-rededication-concert-to-raise-funds-for-scholarships/ Sept. 19 – ARTalk features Jess T. Dugan, whose work explores gender, sexuality, identity…


Bryan rededication concert to raise funds for scholarships

The College of Musical Arts will present a rededication concert of the newly renovated Bryan Recital Hall Sunday, Sept. 18 at 3 p.m. in the venue.The concert will feature performances by 38 university faculty and graduate student musicians. Interim Dean of the College of Musical Arts William Mathis will host the concert which will raise money for music scholarships. Tickets are $50. Contact: https://commerce.cashnet.com/cashnetk/selfserve/BrowseCatalog.aspx. Further questions call 419-372-8654. The concert will be followed by a reception and tour of the hall. Brad Cresswell, of WGTE Radio will serve as master of ceremonies. The program will feature music for voice, piano, strings, brass and woodwinds, jazz, and opera and Broadway selections. In his notes for the performance, Mathis writes: “The impact and rich history of music performance, music instruction and community outreach in Bryan Hall is difficult to measure. Notable guests have performed and taught here including names such as David Brubeck, Yo Yo Ma, Ray Brown, Marilyn Horne, John Cage, and BGSU alumna and Pulitzer Prize winner Jennifer Higdon. The hall plays host to featured guest artists, faculty recitals, daily classes and rehearsals, and scores of student performances each year. “ The recital hall was originally supported by a gift from Ashel and Dorothy Bryan. The renovation was made possible by a gift from their son David Bryan and his wife, Myrna.


Black Swamp Arts Festival Update: Closing time

By BG INDEPENDENT NEWS (This is  the last of our blog posts about the Black Swamp Arts Festival. See you next year.) Every year I get that wistful feeling when Main Street in downtown Bowling Green reverts to its workaday self after the two and a half days of the Black Swamp Arts Festival. It’s like seeing the first discarded Christmas tree on the curb. The festival came off well. All those weather worries proved for naught. Saturday had intermittent showers, and late in the afternoon there were sudden hard gusts of wind, that had artists and helpers scurrying to better secure their booths. But that passed. If they gave a best of show honors for weather, Sunday would certainly be a top contender. One thing artists have consistently noted is that when it rains at the Black Swamp Arts Festival, the crowds seek cover in shops and booths and then return as soon as the rain stops. They don’t just go away. The result was Saturday wasn’t a bad day for art sales, and Sunday was far better. Ceramicist Jan Bostwick said she and her partner were “clicking our heels” over the amount of pottery she moved, and fabric artist Becca Levenson gleefully compressed her remaining stock into less than two feet of rack space. Now they’ll be back to work, producing more merchandise for their next fairs. Others didn’t fare as well. Jeweler Amy Beeler said hers were all right. That’s been true the entire season. She’d been told by veteran exhibitors that sales always get slow during presidential election years, especially when there’s no incumbent in the race. Most artists said their sales were good. Amy Craft Ahrens, co-chair of the concessions committee, said that sales in the beer garden were up dramatically on Friday, and just a little off on Saturday night. Speaking just as the festival was closing down, she said she was optimistic about Sunday given the length of the lines. Certainly the crowds…


Misfeldt honored at the 2016 OCTA Conference

At the sixty-third annual conference of the Ohio Community Theatre Association (OCTA), held at the Holiday Inn in Independence, Ohio, over the Labor Day weekend, Willard Misfeldt of Black Swamp Players was one of three OCTA members inducted into the state organization’s Hall of Fame.  This is an honor which recognizes outstanding achievements, contributions, and support by members of the organization. Willard has been involved in amateur theatricals since his high school senior class play and has been a member of Black Swamp Players since 1975, serving the group in various capacities including as President and as representative to the state organization.  He has been a regular attendee at regional and state OCTA conferences and has brought home a number of awards. In February and March of this year his more than forty years of theatre design work was surveyed in an exhibition at the Four Corners Center gallery in downtown Bowling Green. Dr. Misfeldt was a professor of art history in BGSU’s School of Art for 31 years.  For him theatre was a strong hobby and good way to have fun away from the job.


Soprano Stacey Mastrian honors Italian heritage with art song recital

  By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Comic timing brought composer Christopher Dietz and singer Stacey Mastrian together. Dietz, who teaches composition at Bowling Green State University, heard the Seattle-based soprano perform on a contemporary music concert. She sang a comic piece, and Dietz also had a comic piece performed on the same bill. Two funny pieces on one contemporary music recital is extraordinary, Dietz said. “I should talk to this person,” the composer said. He was impressed by her musical technique, “impeccable intonation” as well as her “sure sense of the personality of the piece.” “She sold it with such confidence,” he said. That she was able to execute a difficult contemporary piece and perform it in an engaging manner, set her apart, Dietz said. “This is a special kind of singer.” They’ve been in touch ever since then, and now with funding and timing falling in line, Mastrian is now visiting BGSU. She’s working with students, both composers and singers. Mastrian will perform a recital, Post-Puccini: The Contemporary Voice, Saturday at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall on campus. She will perform vocal works composed between 1923 and the present by Luciano Berio, John Cage, Alfredo Casella, Thomas DeLio, Bruno Maderna, Stephen Lilly, and Luigi Nono. The recital has ample selections representing Mastrian’s own particular specialty, art songs from Italy. She always loved art songs, but she wondered why there were so few from Italian composers. “People may know Respighi.” Mastrian is of Italian extraction. The family name was Mastroianni “until a few letters got chopped off” during the immigration process in the early 20th century. “Italian has always resonated with me,” she said. She started studying the language when she was in high school. This meshed well with her growing interest in contemporary music. She did her undergraduate work at Catholic University in Washington D.C. where she had limited exposure to contemporary music. She did not care for what she heard in music history class. But during the orientation…


The musical evolution of Corey Baum

By LUDMILA POLYAKOVA For BG Independent News Corey Baum picked up his guitar in second grade and has yet to set it down. Baum has been creating music as long as he can remember, from first taking guitar lessons to playing the upright bass in the Kenwood Elementary Orchestra—that’s right, he’s a Bowling Green native—which eventually led to a music scholarship to Bowling Green State University. Along the way, Baum has had a rap persona (The Suave Farmer) and a hip-hop group (IDB Rangers), played drums for a punk outfit (Bullet Teeth), and was the front man for two indie rock bands (The Press Gang, Stop Don’t Stop). And that’s just to name a few. In 2007, Baum started a new project and called himself Taber Maine. “That’s when I started to get serious about myself as a songwriter.” Baum had been writing songs that were hard to categorize, and began to channel a southern, Appalachian sound. Taber Maine inspired Baum to move to Austin, Texas, where the vibrant, progressive country music scene has helped him grow into the artist he is today. “In Ohio I was an observer of it,” he said. “Moving down here, I became a direct participant. My joke is always that I moved to Austin calling myself a country artist, but I was actually a folk artist.” Taber Maine was a character; he played rough cowboy-sounding songs fueled by late nights and whisky. But like the many iterations of Baum, it led him to the next phase. “Coming down here, I just felt like my songwriting became more honest, so I didn’t need that persona anymore,” he explained. Baum took his sound from acoustic-folk to full on, honky-tonk country. He began playing under his given name, and when he felt ready to have a band behind him, he adopted the nickname “Croy” to form Croy and the Boys. Croy and The Boys will play Black Swamp Arts Festival on Sunday at the Main Stage, 11…


Philly glass artists display work at River House Arts

River House Arts and Contemporary Art Toledo will present HUSH.ex, an exhibition of works in glass and mixed media by Megan Biddle, Amber Cowan, Jessica Jane Julius, and Sharyn O’Mara. The show opens with a public artists’ reception on Thursday, Sept. 15 from 6 to 9 p.m. and will be on view through Oct. 22, running concurrently with Hot Glass/Cool Music, a month-long community celebration of glass and music in Toledo. HUSH.ex is the second iteration of a body of work that debuted last spring at the Philadelphia Art Alliance. Working over the course of a year, the artists, who are also colleagues on the glass faculty at Tyler School of Art, Temple University, created visually and conceptually diverse works that include site-specific installations as well as individual sculptures and drawings. At the outset, the artists recognized commonalities in their practice: reflection (literal and figurative) and distillation. They began with a collective desire to see past the overstimulus of the digital age and to focus on the analog, narrow the vocabulary from color to gray scale, and capture the power of memory and reflection in interpretation of experience. And yet, there is nothing simplistic either in the ambition or scope of any of the artists’ work. This ambition and scope has not gone unnoticed. In the September 2016 edition of Glass Quarterly, Alexander Rosenberg writes. “It is uncommon to find the flashy and performative medium of glass used to express silence or solitude, but the four artists here offer a convincing alternative to the noise and hyper-connectivity of digital culture.” Megan Biddle is an interdisciplinary artist whose work orbits between sculpture, installation, drawing and video. Rooted in glass, she produces experiment and process driven work with an emphasis on materials and their distinct characteristics. As an observer of nature she responds to the elusive and subtle, reflecting on variations of time, cycles of growth and erosion. She has exhibited nationally and internationally and her work was acquired into the American Embassy’s…