Arts and Entertainment

Bruce Moss named OMEA Outstanding Educator

By Marie Dunn-Harris ’95 From BGSU MARKETING &COMMUNICATIONS Ask any BGSU music student, past or present, who Dr. Bruce Moss is and chances are you will hear nothing but praise and admiration. Moss, a professor and the director of band activities for 23 years in Bowling Green State University’s College of Musical Arts, was named Ohio Music Education Association’s (OMEA) 2017 Most Outstanding Educator of the Year. The award recognizes and honors an OMEA member each year for his or her outstanding service, dedication and overall contribution to music education. The finalists need at least six nomination letters to be considered for the honor, and Dr. Moss had 65. “I was surprised and humbled beyond words when seeing the long list of names of former students and peers from all over the country who wrote letters on my behalf,” Moss said. The list of people who nominated Moss is impressive. Some are former colleagues, but many are students who have gone on to pursue successful music careers. One of them is U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Ryan Nowlin, assistant director of “The President’s Own” U.S. Marine Band. Nowlin studied with Moss for his undergraduate and graduate degrees. In his letter, Nowlin said, “Dr. Moss’s selfless commitment to students, stalwart advocacy for music education, personal and professional integrity, genuine care and concern for student growth, development and success, and his high level of musicianship make him a role model, mentor and tireless devotee to all fortunate enough to study under his baton.” Another world-class musician and nominator is John Hagstrom, a trumpet student of Moss when he taught public school. He now performs in the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. “As I look back at the most important influences on my early development it is clear to me that Bruce Moss was crucially important for my tenacity and honest improvement despite many obstacles,” Hagstrom said. “His focus on quality and finding solutions models a strategic mind-set that I have emulated along with many of his other successful students. “That Bruce Moss is an outstanding music educator is well documented by the outstanding results he has achieved with several generations of students, and this is because he himself personifies the courage and commitment of a mature and educated person. I am only one of so many students who have been…


BG ready to chill out at Winterfest (updated)

From BG CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU The BGSU Ice Arena is celebrating 50 years with Bobcat and Falcon hockey games, pregame party, post reception, skating show and a visit from Scott Hamilton and Alissa Cziny. Ice sculptures will be on display in the Huntington Bank Parking lot downtown along with our new Chillabration Tent serving beer, wine, snacks and entertainment from 4-11 pm on Feb. 11. The 9th Annual Winterfest held in Bowling Green Ohio is on Feb. 10, 11 and 12 which is always the coolest weekend of the year. This Three-day fun-filled community event features Ice Sculpting Demonstrations, Horse-Drawn Carriage Rides, Ice Skating, Chili & Soup Cook-Off, Frostbite Fun Run, Cookie Creations, Youth Dodge Ball, Snow Globe Co-ed Bubble Soccer, Window Youth Art Exhibition, Four Corners Gallery BGHS Art Exhibit and WC Library events to include Home Depot Break It Make It, Hot Chocolate Story time and I Heart Ohio Scavenger Hunt. Schedule of Events (subject to change) Schedule of Events, Feb 10-12, 2017 FRIDAY BGHS Art Show, Four Corners Gallery, 10 a.m. -7 p.m. Youth Dodgeball, BG Community Center, 3:30 p.m. ($8 fee includes pizza) 2 vs 2 Co-ed Snow Globe Soccer Tournament, BG Community Center, 6 p.m. ($15 per team, 3 games guaranteed,  final at 8 p.m.) BGHS Bobcat Hockey vs. Findlay, Slater Family Ice Arena, 7 p.m. (ticket required) Skate with the Bobcats, Slater Family Ice Arena, 8:30-10 p.m. (skate rental available) SATURDAY Ice Carving Demo by Ice Creations, Slater Family Ice Arena, 10 a.m. I Heart Ohio Scavenger Hunt, WC Public Library Second Floor, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. BGHS Art Show, Four Corners Gallery, 10-2 pm 1 mile Frostbite Fun Run presented by BIGGBY, City Park, 11 a.m. (pre-registration w/ fees) Ice Carving Demonstration by  Ice Creations,  Huntington Bank Parking Lot, noon to 4 p.m. Chili & Soup Cook Off, Vet Building at City Park, noon to 2 p.m. ($5 tasting) Cookie Creations for Kids, City Park, 1:30-2:30 p.m. BGHS Art Show, Four Corners Gallery, 2-6 p.m. Break It Make It with Home Depot: Cold Slushy Fun!, WC Public Library,  for all ages from 2-3 p.m. 50th Celebration Pre-Game Party, Slater Family Ice Arena, 3:30-5 p.m. (game ticket holders) Carriage Rides, Four Corners Center, 4-6 p.m. (free) Chillabration Tent offering beer, wine, snacks and entertainment, 4-11 p.m. (tickets at…


BGSU Arts events through Feb. 7

Feb. 1—The Faculty Artist Series continues with percussionist Daniel Piccolo. Piccolo has appeared as a soloist with the Toledo Symphony Orchestra, the University of Michigan Percussion Ensemble, and as a guest artist at colleges and universities around the world. He is also an active composer, writing and arranging music for and featuring percussion instruments. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Feb. 2—The Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series features visiting poet Becca Klaver. Author of chapbooks and poetry collections, Klaver has had poems appear in APR, Fence and jubilat. The craft talk and reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Feb. 3—The Brown Bag Music Series will present a musical theatre extravaganza by pianists from the College of Musical Arts. The program will begin at 11:45 a.m. in the Simpson Building, 1291 Conneaut Ave., Bowling Green. Free Feb. 5—The annual Undergraduate Art and Design Exhibition opening reception will be held at 2 p.m. in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries located in the Fine Arts Center. Free Feb. 5—Bowling Green Philharmonia will perform the music of Richard Wagner at 3 p.m. in Kobacker Hall. Featured soloists are tenor Christopher Scholl and Andrew Pelletier, horn. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171 or visit www.bgsu.edu. Advance tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for students and children. All tickets the day of the performance are $10. Through Feb. 20—The annual Undergraduate Art and Design Exhibition will be on display in the Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman in the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are from 11 a.m.­-4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Feb. 7—The Guest Artist Series continues with accordionist Panagiotis Andreoglou. The program will feature his playing of solo works for accordion and electronics. Andreoglou came to BGSU from Greece as a Fulbright scholar. His performances have been broadcast live by the National Dutch Radio and the Greek National Radio and Television. The concert will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Feb. 7—Tuesdays at the Gish continue with the 2011 film “Pariah,” directed by Dee Rees. The film followsa bashful, aspiring high-school poet in Brooklyn as she tentatively…


Website Hometown Reads promotes locally sourced books

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News When Becky Robinson was young, she read voraciously and dreamed of being a writer. Now an adult with three daughters of her own, she cultivates their love of reading and works to help writers connect with an audience. Robinson recently launched a Bowling Green page in her Hometown Reads project. It’s the 43rd page devoted to locally sourced literature. “The vision of Hometown Reads is for local people to discover authors in their hometowns,” she said. The concept is simple.  First go to the home page (http://hometownreads.com/) and find and see a photographic listing of cities from Ann Arbor to Minnesota’s Twin Cities. Places as small as Grants Pass, Oregon to places as large as Los Angeles. Then click on the photo of the county courthouse and that brings you to: http://hometownreads.com/city/bowling-green. (Or of course you can go directly there.) On the page currently are links to half dozen books by local authors. Click on the link and that connects to more information about the book and author. Like what you see?  For most books there’s “Learn More” button takes you to the author’s home page and another button links to Amazon where you can buy the book. (Many of the books are also available locally.) Robinson said usually she wants more books to populate a page before launching it, but she felt there was enough market in Bowling Green to take a chance. She like to see more writers affiliated with Bowling Green State University avail themselves of the service. The service for writers is free. Robinson said at first it was free for the writer’ first book, with a charge for any subsequent volumes, but she is switching to make all listings free. At this point Hometown Reads is a passion project that’s funded by her core business Weaving Influence. That company provides marketing assistance, both online and traditional, for the authors of business books. The Lambertville, Michigan-based entrepreneur founded Weaving Influence in 2012, and she now employs about 30 associates. She launched the business after earning a bachelor’s degree in English from Miami University and a master’s degree in Intercultural Studies at Wheaton College in Illinois. No formal tutelage in business or marketing, she notes. Robinson spent nine years at home raising her daughters. She transitioned…


Kesha and The Creepies electrify crowd in Bowling Green

By  ANNIE GALLO Special to BG Independent News Kesha is back at it again with her band “The Creepies” as she kicked off her first concert of 2017 Friday night at Bowling Green University’s Stroh Center. Kesha and the Creepies took the stage as a part of the Bands4Change charity concert. By choice of the artist, all proceeds went to the National Eating Disorder Association, Humane Society International and RAINN (Rape, Abuse, Incest National Network).   Though she has been struggling with a legal battle for the past two years, that did not stop her from performing a kickass show and providing support to those struggling with accepting the new president.  In between performing rock renditions of older songs, Kesha talked about how she will fight for human rights even if our new president doesn’t. “I’m with you, I’m standing beside you, I’m standing behind you, and we will not ever give up,” Kesha said.   After speaking those words her band started to play “Your Love Is My Drug.” She belted out all the lyrics enthusiastically as her boyfriend Brad Ashenfelter danced around her with a gay pride flag. From singing old songs like “Tik Tok” to newer songs like “Timber” Kesha gave it her all on stage and showed fans a different side of her. The most heartbreaking, but captivating moment of the concert was when Kesha sang a cover of the song “You Don’t Own Me” by Leslie Gore. With every word that came out of her mouth you could feel her vulnerability and the pain she has been going through. She told the crowd Friday she has 72 newly recorded songs she cannot wait to release and she said she is fighting every day to give her fans new music. “I know I was put on Earth to do this with you guys and I will not let that get f*****g taken away from me,” she said. After attending a Kesha and The Creepies concert it is clear to see that Kesha has not only the talent, but the attitude and positivity to inspire many people. Whether music fans like pop or rock, Kesha’s talent is undeniable after witnessing her sing these songs in such a bold new way. Kesha and The Creepies’ renditions have enough of everything to ensure everyone…


Greek accordion virtuoso Panagiotis Andreoglou in residence at BGSU

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Early in her 2014 stay in Thessaloniki, Greece, as a Fulbright Scholar at the Municipal Conservatory at Thermi, Dr. Elainie Lillios, a music composition faculty member specializing in electroacoustic music, attended a concert featuring accordion music. One Greek performer was playing Luciano Berio’s “Sequenza XIII” for accordion, and Lillios found herself “transfixed by the young accordion player. He was amazing.” That was the start of her acquaintance with Panagiotis Andreoglou. Not only is he an accomplished and riveting musician who has given the world premieres of many solo and chamber music works in concerts throughout Europe, but he also shares Lillios’s interest in contemporary and electroacoustic music. The friendship begun in Greece has now resulted in Andreoglou coming to Bowling Green State University as a Fulbright Scholar for the spring semester. “The goal of the Fulbright Program is to meet people and exchange ideas,” he said. “I think with this we are achieving that.” He is working with faculty and students in the College of Musical Arts’ highly regarded program in contemporary music. It is turning out to be a comfortable and productive fit, both personally and professionally. “I feel this is the proper place for my interest,” he said. In addition to the interaction with faculty and students, he finds that the facilities are excellent. “The electroacoustic studios are very fine. I’m very happy to be here,” he said. Area audiences will get to experience his exciting performance on Feb. 7, when he gives a free Guest Artist Series concert at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at Moore Musical Arts Center. The program will feature his playing of solo works for accordion and electronics. That will be the first of three presentations planned during his stay. His second public appearance will be a talk on Feb. 10 at a seminar for composition students, where he will share information about the accordion and present its possibilities. Andreoglou plays the classical, or concert, accordion, a larger version than the style used to play folk music. With buttons on each side and the ability to produce polyphonic textures, it is well-suited for contemporary music. He is eager to share knowledge about his instrument and encourage composers to write for it. Historically speaking, “it’s a new instrument,” he said, “and…


As FCC auction nears end, future of WBGU-TV hangs in balance

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The fate of WBGU-TV may be known by early spring. After more than a year, the Federal Communications Commission’s incentive auction of spectrum is drawing to a close. The auction, which began last March, is nearing the end of its four-stage of bidding. This is expected to be the final stage. After that in about a month there will be another auction to determine what stations land where. Only after that is completed will we know where stations, including WBGU-TV, will land. In summer, 2015, officials at Bowling Green State University, which holds the WBGU’s license, announced they were considering participating in the process that is designed to reallocate broadcast spectrum for use by wireless companies. After a couple months of public forums, where the comments were overwhelmingly in favor of maintaining the station, the administration said it favored participating in the auction while still keeping the station on the air. That commitment to maintain WBGU was backed by the university’s trustees. That could mean the public TV station moving to the less desirable VHF part of the spectrum, or partnering with another station to share its spectrum. Charles Meisch, Jr., a senior advisor to the Incentive Auction Task Force, said doing that has required the FCC to come up with a unique auction format. The process started with each station being given an initial bid price. That was $188.4 million for WBGU. That would be a price if the station gave up its license, which the university has said it would not do. The price would be lower depending on where in the VHF spectrum the station ended up. And those are opening bids go down as the auction progresses. Industry media have reported that there was less demand for the broadcast spectrum than anticipated. Once the auction was underway, station representatives were not allowed to comment at all on the procedure, a stance recently reaffirmed by Dave Kielmeyer, chief marketing and communications officer, who as part of his position oversees WBGU. Meisch said he could not comment activity for a specific station, but could talk about the process in general. Each stage of the auction has involved two rounds. In one, the reverse auction, the FCC tried to find the lowest price at which stations would relinquish…


BGSU Dance Program showcases local choreography in concert, Jan. 27 & 28

From COLLEEN MURPHY Staff and students of the BGSU Dance Program proudly present the Winter Dance Concert this Friday, Jan. 27,  and Saturday, Jan. 28, . The concert features choreography by Dance Program faculty Kristi Faulkner, Colleen Murphy, Tammy Starr, and Tracy Wilson, as well as undergraduate Dance major Courtney Alston. Dance majors and minors have been rehearsing for the performance since the fall semester. The concert highlights versatility in the BGSU Dance Program, with ballet, contemporary, jazz, and tap dances on display. In addition, a special work features Dance Program faculty Tammy Starr and Tracy Wilson, and BGSU Dance Program alumnae Samantha Stearns and Alexa Rittichier. The Winter Dance Concert is produced with generous support from the BGSU Department of Theatre & Film.  The concert will be held at 8pm in the Wolfe Center for The Arts Donnell Theatre. Tickets are $10 at the door. Contact Colleen Murphy cmurphy@bgsu.edu for additional information.    


BGSU arts events through Feb. 8

From BGSU MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Jan. 25 – The Faculty Artist Series presents pianist Robert Satterlee. He has appeared on the Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concerts in Chicago, San Francisco’s Old First Concert Series and the Schubert Club in St. Paul, Minn., among others. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 26 – The Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series features graduate students Sam Adams and Dan Gualtieri. They will present their work at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Jan. 26 – BGSU’s Jazz Lab Band I will perform with guest artist and saxophonist, Loren Stillman. Stillman has received praise in such publications as The New York Times, Downbeat magazine, Jazziz, Jazz Times, and on National Public Radio,marking him as an innovative voice of modern jazz. His original recordings have received critical acclaim from The New York Times and four star recognition in BBC Jazz Review, Jazz Man magazine and Downbeat. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased from the BGSU Arts Box Office at 419-372-8171 or visit www.bgsu.edu/arts. Advance tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for students and children. All tickets the day of the performance are $10. Jan. 27 – Students in the BGSU dance program will present a concert at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre of the Wolfe Center for the Arts. Tickets are $5 at the door. Jan. 27 – The College of Musical Arts Guest Artist Series features “Schubert, Songfulness and the Body,” a lecture/recital by pianist Arved Ashby, a professor of music at Ohio State University. Ashby focuses on 20th- and 21st-century art music within broader contexts of cultural history, critical theory, post-Marxist aesthetics, and media and communications. He is the editor of “Listening to Modernism: Intention, Meaning, and the Compositional Avant-garde” (Rochester, 2004) and author of “Absolute Music, Mechanical Reproduction.” In 1996, Ashby received the prestigious Alfred Einstein Award from the American Musicological Society. The lecture recital will begin at 2:30 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 27 – The Toledo Museum of Art and BGSU’s College of Musical Arts presents EAR | EYE Listening and Looking: Contemporary Music and Art. The performance and…


BG high students get in the act as directors in this weekend’s showcase

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Claire Wells-Jensen is trying to block a quartet of actors on the stage of the Bowling Green Performing Arts Center. The arrangement of actors just doesn’t seem to be coming together quite like she and co-director Lily Krueger envisioned. “This is the most stressful thing I’ve ever done,” she says. Maybe as frustrating as a mom trying to hustle a teenage daughter off to school. Maybe as frustrating as herding cats… on the internet. Wells-Jensen and Krueger are directing “The Internet is Distract – Oh Look A Kitten!” That’s one of four one-act plays on the bill Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday at 7 p.m. at the Bowling Green Performing Arts Center. The school’s Improv Troupe will also perform. Tickets are $8 and $6 for students and senior citizens. Seniors with a Bobcat Pass get in free. Jo Beth Gonzalez, the advisor for the Drama Club, said the program of one-act plays gives students a chance assume the director’s role. “Kids think directing is easy until they do it. They learn so much,” she said. Certainly that was the case for Krueger and Wells-Jensen. “It was not what I expected,” Krueger said.  “We’ve been in one acts directed by students, and you think you know what they’re going through, but it completely different.” The responsibility for the play from selection to staging falls on their shoulders. Wells-Jensen and Krueger realized their young cast needed a little more help concentrating so they did four focus exercises before each rehearsal. The other plays on the bill are: “Windmills and Millstones” by Louise Wade, directed by Meagan Worthy, a thought-provoking play about characters whose playwright has abandoned them. “Action News: Now With 10% More Action” by Jonathan Rand, directed by Rachel Amburgey, a comedy that spoofs local TV news. “Life as a Techie or Something Like It” by Christopher Fleitas, directed by Natalie Avery and Jessica Wilson, a comedy in which a student must decide which faction to belong to – the theatre techies or the actors – of a hilariously bad high school musical. Gonzalez said students must make a proposal explaining why they want to direct and what script they’ve chosen. She said she can give them some guidance as far as scripts, and they see some at the annual state…


BG dinner to toast poet Robert Burns

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Elliot MacFarlane of Bowling Green, found an unusual partner in his celebration of the birth of Scottish national poet Robert Burns, Bulgarian chef Boyko Mitov. For the second year, they are teaming up to present Robert Burns Night dinners , Thursday, Jan. 26, and Friday, Jan. 27, at 6 p.m. both nights at Naslada Bistro, 182 S, Main St., in Bowling Green. Dinners in honor of Burns, around the time of his Jan. 25 birthday, have been celebrated since the poet’s death in 1796, MacFarlane, a member of the St. Andrews Society said. He has been involved in organizing such events for decades in Toledo, Detroit, Frankenmuth and elsewhere. The closest to home was years back when there was one presented at Nazareth Hall. Now, he has to drive miles, to enjoy and help others enjoy this mid-winter festivity. Last year, after working with Mitov on a Scotch tasting dinner, they decided to present a Burns Night celebration. Held one night in January, 2016, the restaurant was packed and had dozens on the waiting list. This year, the Burns dinner will be presented twice. MacFarlane said he’s had people approach him to make sure there’s room. As of Thursday noon, Mitov said there were places for a few more. Each dinner accommodates about 40 people. Only the back part of the restaurant is used. The large tables up front are needed for staging. The event offers a full evening of entertainment, as well as a four-course meal of Scottish specialties. The festivities begin with the arrival of the traditional meat pudding, the haggis, accompanied by a piper. Mitov uses grass-fed beef and fresh lamb to make the traditional dish. MacFarlane said he provided Mitov with Scottish recipes, and he’s tweaked them in his own style. “It’s great working with a good chef,” MacFarlane said. Though the cuisine was new to him, Mitov said, he had no problems adjusting the recipes and the preparation. The format, with paired drink and food, is similar to traditional dinners served in Bulgaria. In both cases, specially selected liquors are serve with complimentary entrees. The haggis will be accompanied by 12-year-old Cragganmore, Speyside Single Malt. The other courses are Cock-a-leekie Soup with 14-year-old Glenfiddich U.S. Exclusive Bourbon Barrel Reserve; Scotch Collops of Beef with…


BGSU Arts Calendar through Feb. 1

Jan. 18 – The Faculty Artist Series features Conor Nelson on flute. Nelson has appeared as a soloist with the Minnesota Orchestra, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and the Flint Symphony, among others. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 19 – The 59th annual Honor Band and Directors Clinic will feature the BGSU Wind Symphony in performance at 8 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 19 – Poet Bruce Weigl will read from his work as part of the Creative Writing Program’s Visiting Writer Series. Weigl is author of “The Circle of Hanah” and more than a dozen books of poetry, including “The Abundance of Nothing”(2012) and “Song of Napalm”(1988), both of which were nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Jan. 20 – The Brown Bag Music Series will feature a musical theatre extravaganza by students and faculty from the College of Musical Arts. The program will begin at 11:45 a.m. in the Simpson Building, 1291 Conneaut Ave., Bowling Green. Free Jan. 21 – The 59th annual Honor Band and Directors Clinic will feature all Ohio Honor Bands. The concert will begin at 3:30 p.m. in Kobacker Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 25 – The Faculty Artist Series presents pianist Robert Satterlee. He has appeared on the Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concerts in Chicago, San Francisco’s Old First Concert Series and the Schubert club in St. Paul, Minn., among others. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Jan. 26 – The Creative Writing Program’s Reading Series features graduate students Sam Adams and Dan Gualtieri. They will present their work at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Jan. 26 – BGSU’s Jazz Lab Band I will perform with guest artist and saxophonist Loren Stillman. Stillman has received praise in such publications as The New York Times, Downbeat magazine, Jazziz and Jazz Times and on National Public Radio,marking him as an innovative voice of modern jazz. His original recordings have received critical acclaim from The New York Times and four star recognition in BBC Jazz Review, Jazz Man magazine and Downbeat. The performance will…


Benefit to raise funds for Standing Rock Water Protectors

By ELENA ENRIQUEZ Join us on Saturday, Jan 21, from noon until closing for BG Standing With Standing Rock at Howard’s Club H to raise money to bring vital supplies to the Water Protectors who are risking their lives in sub zero temperature so that we all may share a healthy planet. The fight for clean water and life is far from over! Acoustic Stage Matt Ingles noon-12:30 April Freed 12:30-1 Jimmy Lambert 1-1:30 Sarah Connelly 1:30-2 Adamantium Experiment 2-2:30 Justin Payne 3-4 Main Stage Cadillac Jukebox 4-4:45 Getting Out Alive 5-5:45 2nd Mile Society 6-6:45 Moths In The Attic 7-7:45 Wood N Strings 8-8:45 Weak Little Ears 9-9:45 Awesome Job 10-10:45 Split Second 11-11:30 Daniken 12-12:45 Musical interludes between acts on the acoustic stage performed by; Matt Cordy, Barry Johnson ,Boo Lee Crosser, Bruce Lilly, and Zack Wilson. There will also be a silent auction, bake sale and food. $5 entry All proceeds from the event go directly into support for either firewood, or to supplies for the Medic Healer council. Let’s come together, the day after the inauguration, in solidarity as a positive, progressive community. Share passions and ideas, speak from your heart of how to transform this reality and how to grow as a community. We are creating a better, more inclusive and caring world for each other. Stand in support of a healthier planet and those who are peacefully protecting this dream. Mni Wiconi! Water is life! (Related story: http://bgindependentmedia.org/local-woman-joins-effort-to-stop-pipeline-at-standing-rock/)


Kehinde Wiley’s urban take on Old Masters coming to Toledo Museum

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART The Toledo Museum of Art presents Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic, an exhibition of 60 paintings and sculptures questioning ideas of race, gender and the politics of representation. On view Feb. 10-May 14, 2017, A New Republic spans Wiley’s 14-year career including his earliest explorations of the male figure, his unique take on Old Master portraiture and his later forays into sculpture and iconography. The exhibition is organized by the Brooklyn Museum. “The magnitude of this exhibition will impress even those familiar with Wiley’s work,” said Brian P. Kennedy, TMA director, president and CEO. “He has taken the grandeur of portrait painting and translated it with his portrayals of contemporary African American men and women. Wiley bridges the gap between traditional portraiture and our daily lives, and in doing so, he raises questions about identity and how we perceive ourselves and others.” Wiley’s signature portraits of everyday men and women riff on specific paintings by Old Masters, replacing the European aristocrats depicted in those paintings with contemporary black subjects, drawing attention to the absence of African Americans from historical and cultural narratives. “The Toledo Museum of Art is home to a wide array of singular masterpieces gathered together from across time and geographic regions,” said Halona Norton-Westbrook, TMA director of collections. “The museum’s strong collection of Old Master paintings offers a particularly compelling framework for the presentation of Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic. Playing with traditional conventions of European portraiture, Wiley examines symbols of power, wealth, status and identity in today’s world. Juxtaposing A New Republic with the Old Master portraits hung in TMA’s adjacent galleries provides context for Wiley’s work. Visitors will be encouraged to examine the paintings that inform his portraits through a new lens.” The subjects in Wiley’s paintings often wear sneakers, hoodies and baseball caps, and are set against contrasting ornate decorative backgrounds that evoke earlier eras and a range of cultures. Through the process of “street casting,” Wiley invites individuals, often strangers he encounters on the street, to sit for portraits. In this collaborative process, the model chooses a reproduction of a painting from a book and reenacts the pose of the painting’s figure. By inviting the subjects to select a work of art, Wiley gives them a measure of control over the way they’re…


Opening acts for Kesha announced

The bands Light Horizon, from Toledo, and Graduation Day have been selected by Kesha and concert promoter Bands4Change as the opening acts for the Kesha and the Creepies Jan. 27 show at the Stroh Center on the Bowling Green State University campus. The show starts at 7 p.m. and tickets are $45, $55 and $65. All of the profits from the show will go to the following charities: Humane Society International; National Eating Disorder Association; and Rape Abuse and Incest National Network. Tickets in sale at Finders Records in downtown Bowling Green, or online http://www.ticketmaster.com/event/08005187F3217896#efeat4211. See related story at: http://bgindependentmedia.org/perrysburg-teen-expresses-passion-for-doing-good-by-bringing-pop-star-kesha-to-stroh-center/