Popular Culture

Oktoberfest Polka party on tap at BGSU, Oct. 19

From THE BGSU DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN RUSSIAN AND EAST ASIAN LANGUAGES The BGSU German Club and the Department of German Russian and East Asian Languages are hosting an Oktoberfest Polka event on Wednesday, Oct. 19 in the Lenhart Grand Ballroom of  Bowen Thompson Student Union on the Bowling Green State University campus. This event will be an opportunity to learn about – and dance to –German-American polkas and popular music played by The Jay Fox Bavarian Band. Jay has more than 40 years of experience to his credit along with a classical accordionist background and was four consecutive years AAA National Accordion Champion. His great-grand parents were born in Leipzig, Germany and being of German heritage, he specializes in German vocals and music. He is versatile and plays a variety of styles including: Viennese waltz, polka, big band, standards, country, blue-grass, pop, rock, oldies and semi-classical. For more info on the band and its members, visit http://jayfoxband.com/band/band.html. An exciting addition this year is a raffle featuring gift cards and other prizes from area businesses including Coyote Beads, D.P. Dough, The Flower Basket, For Keeps, Ginny’s Fashions, Grounds for Thought, Kabob-It, Mister Spots, Pagliai’s Pizza, Pisanello’s, Wings Over BG, and El Zarape. Falcon Food Restaurant is sponsoring the event.Tickets for the raffle will be available at the event. Doors open at 6 p.m. and a traditional German buffet featuring Bratwurst and German potato salad will be served from 6-8 p.m. The $10 admission fee (for non-students) also covers the buffet; students have free admission but there is a $5 charge for the buffet for students. A cash bar serving soft drinks and beer will also be available. For further information, contact Prof. Kristie Foell at foell@bgsu.edu or German Club President Molly Closson at mollyrc@bgsu.edu


3B’s “Young Frankenstein” laughs off Halloween spooks

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News   Get a jump on Halloween with shrieks of laughter rather than shrieks of fear. The folks at 3B Productions will present the musical stage version of Mel Brooks’ “Young Frankenstein” this weekend with shows Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and a Sunday matinee at 2:30 at the Maumee Indoor Theater, 601 Conant St., Maumee. Joe Barton, the show’s director and a founder of the troupe, said the inspiration to stage this Mel Brooks classic came from last fall’s Halloween-themed show, “The Addams Family.” Seeing Randy “Beef” Baughman as Lurch, he and others thought he’d make a great Frankenstein’s monster. Perfect casting, aside from the challenge of finding a tux that fits him. In “Young Frankenstein,” Mel Brooks imagined Frederick Frankenstein following in his grandfather Victor’s footsteps and creating a monster of his own. Brooks, as was his wont, turned the horror of the original and its multiple retellings, on its head and into a relentless comedy. “There’s not sad moment in the show,” Barton said. “Even the love songs are comedic.” Baughman’s son, Will, was cast as Frederick. They’ve shared the stage before, most recently in a very different seasonal musical. In spring Will Baughman played Jesus in “Jesus Christ Superstar” while Randy Baughman played the high-strutting high priest Caiaphas . “Young Frankenstein,” Barton said, gives the younger Baughman a chance to play a lighter, comic role. “It’s fun to watch them work together,” the director said of the father-son duo. With Janine Baughman, Randy’s wife and Will’s mother, as musical director the show as much a family affair for the Baughman’s as it is for the Frankenstein’s. Brooks did a seamless translation of his hit movie to the stage, adding a few musical numbers. Usually when doing a show that has a movie version, Barton advises against watching the film. Actors can pick up the tics of the screen performers. But in this case he told them to go ahead because he wanted to capture the anarchic energy of the original. Brooks wrote all the songs, music and lyrics, except for Irving Berlin’s “Putting’ on the Ritz,” which is used in the show’s tap dance scene. That move from screen to stage requires some stage magic to pull off effects like the operating table that lifts into the air while Frederick and Inga, played by Kristin Kekic, make love on…


Hollywood star America Ferrera tells students: The stakes are high in this election

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News TV and movie star America Ferrera knows what a lot of immigrant kids are going through these days. When she was 9 and living in California’s San Fernando Valley, the state’s voters were considering Prop 187 which would have barred all undocumented immigrants from receiving any public services including education. That was the first election she remembered. Now in the midst of another campaign with high stakes, Ferrera is touring the country to encourage people to register to vote, and then cast ballots for Hillary Clinton. She stopped by Bowling Green State University Sunday morning to give a pep talk to several dozen students preparing to go out and canvass the neighborhoods around campus. The community Ferrera lived in was diverse. She was a first generation America. Her parents came from Honduras. “My friends were first generation all kinds of things,” she said. Their parents came from Vietnam, China, Latin American countries, and Arab countries. At home they ate different kinds of foods and their parents “yelled at us in different languages,” Ferrara said. “But when we went to school we were all Americans because we pledged allegiance to the flag.” They all thought of themselves as “true-blooded Americans,” and “we all deserved justice and to be treated in the same way.” But in 1994 with Prop 187 on the ballot children were being questioned and taunted and threatened. Ferrera hadn’t experienced any of that but her mother took her aside to warn her and tell her if anyone ever questioned her to know: “You didn’t do anything wrong. You belong here.” For the first time in her life, Ferrera felt different from her peers. And she knows now with the overheated anti-immigrant rhetoric coming out of the Donald Trump campaign, families are reporting the same kind of harassment. Kids are told: “My dad says when Trump is president, he’s sending your parents away.” Young Arab-Americans wonder: “What does a ban on Muslims mean for them and their families?” Blacks wonder: “What does a nationwide stop and frisk mean for our lives?” “The stakes have never been higher,” she said. In introducing Ferrera, Kandann Coleman, the president of the Latin Student Union, which sponsored the visit, said the same thing.  “Politics really do matter especially to people of color.” Later in an interview, she said, her fellow students seem “indifferent.” The Democrats and Republicans…


BGSU symposium looks at global response to 9/11

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News On the Friday in advance of the 15th anniversary of 9/11 attacks, students from Bowling Green State University shared what they had learned about how others viewed this defining act of terrorism. And the symposium Global Responses to 9/11 and the War on Terror: Literary, Media, and Film perspectives proved such a success that the organizers are considering whether this should be an annual event. The symposium grew out of Khani Begum’s graduate course of the same name offered in spring, 2015.  The 18 students, who represented a variety of academic disciplines including English, Literary and Textual Analysis, Creative Writing, American Culture Studies and Pop Culture, wrote papers of such distinction that late in the semester Begum mused that it was too bad they couldn’t present them as a group in a conference. Sarah Worman and Elena Aponte, members of ATLAS, an organization of students studying Literary and Textual Analysis, discussed the idea, and decided the organization would take on organizing the event. Begum and the graduate students decided to open symposium up to others who may want to present papers or organize panels. All it meant was working over the summer. Worman said the symposium was well attended with the keynote address by Jeffrey Brown, professor in the Pop Culture Department, on “Rewriting 9/11: Superheroes and the Remasculinization of America” drawing the largest audience. Begum had asked Brown to present the talk after hearing him give a class on the topic during last spring’s alumni college. More than a dozen other faculty members also volunteered to present papers or participate in panel discussions. The subjects ranged from a panel of Muslim women talking about their experiences wearing the veil while living in American to a discussion of stand-up comedians’ handling of the tragedy. There were presentations about news coverage, rap music’s response, the impact on children, and the many films and television shows addressing the attack and its aftermath. Worman’s paper contrasted two cinematic looks at terror mastermind Osama Bin Laden. One was the American movie “Zero Dark Thirty,” and the other was the Bollywood film “Tere Bin Laden.” The American action-thriller, directed by Kathryn Bigelow, had revenge at its core, she said. The Indian film, however, took a comic approach. It was about a Pakistani reporter who wants to move to America. He thinks if he can peddle a film about an…


BGSU Lively Arts Calendar, Sept. 6- 21

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Sept. 6 – Tuesdays at the Gish kicks off with “Almost Famous” (2000), directed by Cameron Crowe. Set in the 1970s, this semi-autobiographical story based on the director’s experiences as a rock journalist for Rolling Stone continues to be a beloved coming-of-age and rock-n-roll film. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Sept. 7 – The Faculty Artist Series continues with Penny Thompson Kruse performing on violin presenting a recital on the theme of Farewell to Summer. The recital begins at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 8 – The Visiting Writer Series welcomes American fiction writer Alissa Nutting, author of “Tampa” and the short story collection “Unclean Jobs for Women and Girls.” The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Sept. 8 – BGSU’s International Film Series commences with “Fordson: Faith, Fasting and Football,” directed by Rashid Ghazi. The 2016 documentary follows a predominantly Arab-American high school football team from Dearborn, Mich., during the last 10 days of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan and unearths the story of a community desperately holding onto its Islamic faith while struggling to gain acceptance in post 9-11 America. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. Free Sept. 10 – The Falcon Marching Band will perform during the BGSU vs North Dakota football game. Join in the festivities at 3 p.m. in the Doyt Perry Stadium. Tickets to the football game are available at bgsufalcons.com/buytickets or 1-877-247-8842. Sept. 10 – Guest artist Stacy Mastrian, soprano, will perform in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center at 8 p.m. Free Sept. 11 – The Sunday Matinee Series begins with the 1912 films “An Unseen Enemy” and “Musketeers of Pig Alley,” directed by D.W. Griffith, followed by “Harvest” (1953), directed by James Sheldon. In this “Robert Montgomery Presents,” two legendary figures appear: Dorothy Gish is James Dean’s mother in a highly charged farm-country drama, which has been preserved in Kinescope form. The screening begins at 3 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Sept. 11 – The Faculty Artist Series continues with assistant professor of violin Caroline Chin performing at the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St., Toledo. The recital begins at 3 p.m. in the Great Gallery. Free Sept. 13…


Author to discuss Ohio’s presidential election bellwether status at Toledo Museum of Art, Sept.22

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART Kyle Kondik, author of the new book “The Bellwether: Why Ohio Picks the President,” will appear on Sept. 22 at the Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle. Just days ahead of the first presidential candidate debate, Kondik will shed light on the Buckeye State’s remarkable record as a predictor of presidential election winners. The free event at 7 p.m. is being presented jointly by the Museum and the Toledo Lucas County Public Library. Kondik is managing editor for the nonpartisan political forecasting newsletter Sabato’s Crystal Ball, published by the University of Virginia Center for Politics. Using historical documentation and research, he will explain Ohio’s remarkable record for predicting presidential election results and why the state is essential to the 2016 election. A book signing and reception in Libbey Court will follow the presentation. Kondik is the first of five speakers making appearances in Toledo this fall in conjunction with the Museum’s nonpartisan exhibition I Approve This Message: Decoding Political Ads. Others include University of Michigan political scientist Ted Brader; American Press Institute senior manager Jane Elizabeth; University of Michigan musicologist Mark Clague; and media, entertainment and technology executive/advisor Don Levy. (See BG Independent News story on the exhibit at: http://bgindependentmedia.org/toledo-museum-exhibit-dissects-the-emotional-manipulation-of-political-ads/) Ted Brader, author of the book “Campaigning for Hearts and Minds,” will discuss how emotional appeals in political ads work at 2 p.m. Sept. 24 in the Little Theater. Brader is a professor of political science at the University of Michigan and at the Center for Political Studies in the Institute for Social Research. He is a principal investigator of the American National Election Studies and has received multiple grants from the National Science Foundation for studies of political psychology, political communication, public opinion and voting behavior. A book signing will follow in Libbey Court. Jane Elizabeth will give a presentation titled “Fact-Challenged: Finding Truth and Accuracy in a Fact-Resistant World,” at 2 p.m. Oct. 1 in the Little Theater. A senior manager at the American Press Institute, she will discuss the challenges journalists face in reaching voters with the facts during a fact-challenged campaign advertising season. Music has the power to inspire devotion and mobilize individuals to action. University of Michigan musicologist Mark Clague discusses how music has been used to shape U.S. presidential contests, at 2 p.m. Oct. 8 in the Little Theater. As examples, he will offer songs ranging from 19th century parodies to…


Old salt earns ribbons in maiden voyage as fair competitor

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Jim Graf took his time making his maiden voyage as an exhibitor at the Wood County Fair. Growing up in Grand Rapids, he never exhibited. He was active in Pinewood Derby and made a few car models. Graf, 80, had a varied career – factory work, selling insurance, then banking. After that he owned a mobile home park, drove a truck and worked as “a cook and go-fer” for a hazardous waste cleanup company. Then 12 years ago while he and his wife, Vicky, were wintering in Texas, she got him a project, a model of the U.S.S. Constitution, known as “Old Ironsides.” “I thought he’d enjoy it,” she said. “He’s the kind of person when he sets his sights on something, he’ll finish them,” she said, adding she “learned new combinations of words” during the construction process. Graf set to work. He worked at it for a year then set it aside. “I put it in dry dock.” But his wife knew he’d return. And, he did. A decade later, he was back at it. “Now that my fingers were numb and my eyes are bad, I get to the hardest part. A 16-year-old could tie one of those knots in one third of the time it took me,” Graf said. “You know in my old age this taught me a lot about perseverance and patience.” He invested hundreds of hours in the project, redoing the rigging several times. The two years in spent actually building the model is about as long as it took to build the original back in the late 18th century. Once finished, complete with sailors in the crow’s nest, the U.S.S. Constitution was docked in a place of honor, in a window in their home. But Vicky Graf had another idea, bring it to the fair and enter it in the model competition. “This wasn’t my idea,” said Graf. But Vicky Graf said she wanted to exhibit it because her husband had stuck with the project and completed all the close work required. “This is a heck of an accomplishment. I’m just really proud of him.” The result was a blue ribbon and a best of show. Now it will return to its berth in their Bowling Green home. And that Graf said is the end of his career as a Wood County Fair exhibiting career. “It’s the…


‘Orange Is the New Black’ author to visit BGSU

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Piper Kerman, best-selling author of “Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison” will be on BGSU’s campus Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016 to discuss her book and her life story. Kerman will be presenting as part of the Ordinary People, Extraordinary Stories lecture series sponsored by BGSU University Libraries and its Leadership Council. Dinner will begin at 6:30 p.m. with the presentation following at 7:30 p.m. A VIP event will begin at 5:30 p.m. All events are hosted in the Lenhart Grand Ballroom of the Bowen-Thompson Student Union. Tickets for the event are $30 for dinner and $100 for the VIP event and dinner. Tickets are available now at bgsu.edu/libraryevent. Kerman’s book chronicles her 13 months spent in the Federal Correctional Institution in Danbury, Connecticut. In her book she explores the experience of incarceration and the intersection of her life with the lives of the women she met while in prison: their friendships and families, mental illnesses and substance abuse issues, cliques and codes of behavior. Since her release, Kerman has worked tirelessly to promote criminal justice reform. She serves on the board of the Women’s Prison Association, which provides preventative services for at-risk women, works to create alternatives to incarceration, advocates against practices like shackling during childbirth and offers programs to aid reentry into society. In her professional career as a communications consultant with Spitfire Strategies, she has worked on a number of criminal justice issues, including public defense reform, juvenile justice reform and the legal challenge to the “stop and frisk” laws in New York. She is a member of the advisory board for InsideOUT Writers. Kerman’s memoir was adapted into a critically acclaimed Netflix original series of the same name by Jenji Kohan. The Emmy and Peabody Award-winning show has been called “the best TV show about prison ever made” by The Washington Post. Guests with disabilities are requested to indicate if they need special services, assistance or appropriate modifications to fully participate in this event by contacting Disability Services, dss@bgsu.edu, 419-372-8495 prior to the event.


The United States of Pokémon Go

An opinion piece by ELIZABETH ROBERTS-ZIBBEL Just a few days after the now infamous app Pokémon Go was released, after we had finally broken through the frustratingly busy servers, I took both girls on a Pokémon-catching journey to City Park. They got out and ran toward the playground, clutching their devices. I immediately spotted another player and watched from the car, curious about whether they would cross paths with him. He was a large young man with a buzz cut and a sleeveless t-shirt, his arms covered with tattoos. He paused, looked up from his phone and smiled at my daughters, and Alexandra brushed her hair out of her face and said something to him. Excitedly, she held up her phone and the man nodded, pointing into the distance, and Isobel began jumping up and down, they chatted some more, and then went their separate ways. I got out and sat down on a bench, and as Alexandra walked around Isobel handed me her tablet and went to play in the sandbox. Soon Alexandra decided, on her own, to approach a group of several other young adult Pokémon Goers, and they conferred for a while. She ran over to me. “There are so many people playing this game! It’s so much fun to talk to everyone!” This, my shy girl who has a hard time even talking to people she knows sometimes. She went over to the sandbox to join Isobel, and there was another pair obviously playing nearby; she began talking to them too. I heard the man exclaim, “You got a Lickitung? Where did you find that?” Sand Ridge Road, I heard her reply, and he said to the woman with him, “We have to check out Sand Ridge Road!”                 For those who don’t know, Pokémon Go is an augmented reality game that uses a device’s camera and location services to place Pokémon into players’ actual environments, which they can then catch by tossing a red and white PokéBall at them. Users see their human avatar and a map on the screen, and get alerts when Pokémon are nearby. When one gets close enough, the map disappears and is replaced by what would be seen through the cell phone camera, but with a Pokémon placed over it which can then be caught through interaction with the screen. PokéStops are locations (parks, monuments, churches,…


Toledo Museum exhibit dissects the emotional manipulation of political ads

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News As someone who began his political education at the family dinner table, walking through the Toledo Museum of Art’s exhibit “I Approve This Message: Decoding Political Ads” is like strolling through a chapter of my autobiography. Politics made an early entry into my consciousness, and even the few election cycles beyond my actual memory – pretty much the Eisenhower campaigns – had a certain resonance. The elegantly dressed housewives with their crisp East Coast collegiate accents could have been sisters of June Cleaver, the mom on “Leave It To Beaver.” That Lena Dunham, the creator of “Girls,” pops on the screen right after in an ad built on a double entendre about losing her virginity and voting for the first time only highlights how much has changed. In a way. Listening to the issues – guns, poverty, crime, unemployment – that run through the discourse, a viewer would be right to despair about whether we’ve made any progress at all. But for exhibit creator Harriet Levin Balkind, the issues aren’t what matters when it comes to convincing voters how to cast their ballots. It’s all about emotion. Television advertisements are carefully crafted works of art intended to evoke those emotions. The same tools used by artists, are used by political hucksters. That’s why, TMA Director Brian Kennedy said, the exhibit belongs in the museum. “We’re a museum that’s has always been predicated on art education. We’ve been about educating people to see through works of art, and political ads are works of art of a kind. It’s really important we understand them.” With the Republican Party set to hold its convention in Ohio, and another presidential election underway the timing of the exhibit couldn’t be better. “I Approve This Message” is the brainchild of Balkind, the founder of Honest Ads. An expert in brand marketing, she started her research into what drives people to vote in 2014 after her agency was sold. What she found was people often vote for candidates who lie to them. This was behavior they would not accept from their spouses, kids, friends or co-workers. This was behavior that is illegal in advertising for consumer goods but is perfectly legal in political ads because of the First Amendment. As she read about cognitive psychology, neuroscience and political science, she came to the conclusion that people don’t vote based on the…


Holocaust memorial not place to play Pokemon Go

SYLVANIA – The Jewish Federation of Greater Toledo is asking that those playing Polemon Go refrain from playing at the center’s Holocaust memorial. “Doing so disrespects the memory of Holocaust victims, survivors, and family members. Our memorial is a sacred place for solemn reflection, not for gaming,” it said in a statement. The federation has requested that Niantic, the creator of Pokémon Go, remove the memorial as a place of interest from the game. The federation did say it “welcomes all budding Pokémon trainers to play Pokémon Go on its campus and at the YMCA/JCC. ”    


OPINION: Stay true to Muhammad Ali’s radicalism

By DALTON ANTHONY JONES On this day in history. There is so much chatter going on around the passing of this monumental icon of black liberation, anti-imperialism, spiritual freedom and resistance to state violence that I find myself playing spectator to the outpouring of collective grief. I am always curious about, and to be quite honest deeply suspicious of, mass expressions of praise and sympathy for radical figures who, if they were fighting for the principles we claim to honor in them today, would be banished and ridiculed by civil society. MLK, Malcolm, Arthur Ashe, the Panthers, Muhammad Ali….one is left with the impression that they would be welcomed with open arms and flowers if they were to return to us. Has our society really become that more progressive? Has a critique of U.S. intervention abroad really become the emotional norm? Have black people really developed a more radical critique about their position vis-a-vis, the American war machine, the American police state, the American system of finance capitalism and the exploitation of our communities? Please don’t get me wrong, we still have our warriors of social justice, people who are devoting themselves to preserving and furthering the legacy of those who fought to expose the hypocrisies of nationalism and make this world a more safe and just place to be. But taken as a whole, I see more faux sentimentalism than genuine identification in these mourning rituals, these pageants of lamentation and nostalgia. I have a narrative of identification with Ali, of the family huddled around the radio listening to his bouts before the days of internet and cable, of my grandfather meeting Ali and bringing me back his autograph on the conference program….and, of course, so much more. He meant a lot to us. But I hope to honor his passing by being a voice that is willing to accept sanctions to defend and speak my truth. Today, I want to make a recommitment to say “no” to racist oppression, to say  “no” to patriarchal oppression, to say “no” to the apparatus of state violence, to say “no” to the bigotry of gender and queer phobia, to say “no” to the exploitation of our land, animals and air for the accumulation of a surplus profit that will end up in the hands of a minuscule percent of the global population. Muhammad Ali, I offer you this in honor of…


BGSU offers lifelong learning through Summer College

Bowling Green State University’s Alumni Summer College is not just for alumni – this special programming is open to anyone who wants to stretch their mind. “BGSU provides experiences that enhance lives,” said Becky Kocher, assistant vice president for Alumni Relations and Annual Giving. “Through Summer College we can provide lifelong learning opportunities to a wide range of people interested in stimulating classes and discussions.” This series of educational, and fun, classes will promote lively, thought-provoking discussions and include a variety of excursions. Class will be taught by BGSU’s nationally recognized faculty and attendees will be able to choose nine of 22 possible courses, including: The Art Car in Popular Culture The History of Rock and Roll (with a visit to BGSU’s Sound Recordings Archives) The Heavy Metal T-shirt in Popular Culture U.S. Elections in Comparative Perspective Brainstorming the Novel Social Media is Changing how Business is Conducted Today What is the Value of a College Education Female Hard-Boiled Detective Tradition Technology “Sandbox” Alumni Summer College runs from June 29 to July 1 and costs $190 per person. This includes classes, some meals, special guests and tours. A one-day only session is $100. Some excursions may have an additional cost. Attendees may stay on campus, in one of BGSU’s newest and most comfortable residence halls, Centennial Hall, for $79 per night. Off-campus lodging is at attendees’ expense; most local hotels offer a special “BGSU rate.” To our guests with disabilities, please indicate if you need special services, assistance or appropriate modifications to fully participate in this event by contacting Disability Services, dss@bgsu.edu, 419-3728495. Please notify us prior to the event.


BGSU grad speakers tell of different paths to success

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Speaking at Commencement ceremonies Saturday morning at Bowling Green State University, ESPN personality Jay Crawford remembered his first college class. It was a speech course that met in South Hall in 1983, and as an exercise the professor asked them to tell the class what they hoped to achieve. The freshman from Sandusky said: “I’m here to be a television sports anchor.” “I had no idea how crazy that sounded, and I’m glad I didn’t,” he told the graduates from the College of Arts and Science. “I heard the chuckles in the back of the room, but I didn’t listen to them.” He cautioned the graduates that for every friend and family member who supports them there will be “many more who will stand between you and what you dream of and what you want the most. Hear those voices but let them fuel you.” So the kid from Sandusky persisted. Armed with a degree in radio, television and film, he went into broadcast. Now the 1987 graduate is at the top of his field as co-host for the midday edition of ESPN’s flagship program “Sports Center.” Crawford has “wildly exceeded the dreams” he had that first day in class at BGSU, he said. Honorary doctoral degree recipient Maribeth Rahe, president and chief executive officer of Fort Washington Investment Advisors, took a less direct route to success. “Career paths are not linear,” she told the graduates. Her mother urged her to go to college to pursue the opportunities denied women of older generations. She graduated in 1970 with a BA in Spanish with a minor in business. She only came to BGSU after first attending Miami University. Rahe’s career sights were not as precisely set as Crawford’s. She wanted to learn Spanish, study abroad and be active on campus. At Miami, she found her choices to study abroad limited. Her sister’s BGSU roommate, though, told her she could study abroad for a full year in Madrid. She transferred and at BGSU got the grounding she needed to pursue a career in finance. “If you like what you do, it does show up in your work and life,” Rahe said. “and if you don’t, seek out another opportunity. … Do not settle for something expedient or what someone else thinks you should do. Trust your own instincts.” Crawford recalled his own graduation 29 years ago….


Old tunes find new listeners at concert for young & young at heart

With an audience made up largely of kids age 4 through 7, the line between moving to the music and fidgeting is pretty fine. It didn’t matter that the music was not only before their time – because everything is before their time – but before their parents’ time, and likely even before their grandparents’ time. The beat was good. A few youngsters broke out the dance steps, a few swayed in rhythm in their seats and a few fidgeted. Teachers know the difference. For its Young and Young at Heart concert Friday, the Bowling Green bands threw open the doors of the Performing Arts Center to senior citizens and pre-school, kindergarten and first graders from Kenwood, Conneaut and Crim. The older listeners mostly took up the back rows, while the front of the house was packed with kids, and their outnumbered teachers. After some preludes on marimba, the concert got underway with the high school’s jazz band, the Jazz Cats. Their short set was devoted to swing classics from the 1930s and 1940s. But what’s 70 years when one of the songs is named “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy,” which is deliciously funny to say. During the switch between the Jazz Cats and Symphonic Band, Band Director Bruce Corrigan demonstrated how that bugle boy blew those notes. More funny sounds, more laughs. Corrigan knew his audience. Then the Symphonic Band stepped forward with Morton Gould’s “American Salute,” a fantasy on “When Johnny Comes Marching Home,” then a bit of musical magic, a piece featuring a flute solo by Lilly Rakas, and a musical tribute to bugs that included a couple of comically cavorting butterflies. The time just flew until the show ended up in a galaxy a long time ago. First graders trooped up to the stage to take positions within the band, and don the visages of Stormtroopers, Ewoks and Wookiees. Then with their masked associates at their feet,  the musicians played music from “Star Wars,” a preview of a May 10 at 7 p.m. concert when the winds will join the string orchestra to play music from “Star Wars: The Force Awakens.” Now it was time for the youngsters to troop out to waiting buses, and for the elders to convene in the atrium for cookies… sorry, kids. Emma Cook was on hand with her husband and two young grandchildren. The youngsters’ sister, who was there with her…