Popular Culture

Everyone gets into the act at Arts X

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News At Arts X a surprise awaits the visitor around every corner. An actress in a shimmering gown and dramatic blond wig, steps forward to sing “Let It Go.” One of the Living Statues in the lobby of the Wolfe Center, she’s been waiting her turn as other characters have stepped forward to offer a song or monologue. Look up and there’s a pair of eyes projected overhead. Big Sister is watching. As the audience settles for a performance in the Donnell Theatre, someone says she has just posed for a Vogue cover. Two comedians come careening down the hall on the second floor of the Wolfe Center, making a harried entrance into the Heskett dance studio. Do you know there’s an art exhibit, they exclaim. It’s part of the act; we’re all part of the act. There’s always something to see and hear and do at Arts X, and that means there’s always something to miss. There’s always someone new to meet, or an old friend to greet. With the end of the semester looming, and finals and holiday festivities just ahead, artists, performers, writers and their fans took time out to celebrate. Arts X drew hundreds to the Bowling Green State University School of Art and the Wolfe Center Saturday night. The annual event is part art fair, part music and theater festival, part holiday party. Arts X organizers have been tweaking its presentation since the start. This year the Bowling Green Philharmonia offered a prelude of holiday music in the Donnell before the hubbub officially ensued. The theme “Volanti: Seeking Unknown Heights” tied in with the featured guest artists Violet and Fortuna, storytelling acrobats. They performed two shows in the Donnell, sections from their work-in-progress, “Laces.” The piece combined a disembodied voice emerging from the dark to set the scene, a house in Toledo’s Old West End. The scenes introduced the audience to the home’s inhabitants. There was a very tall man, the original owner. There were stuffed toys left behind in a trunk. There was a lesbian couple who made the property bloom with plants and company. These stories were played out with circus arts – aerial work, acrobatics, clowning, tightrope walking. In the most dramatic instances the duo of Erin Garber-Pearson and Kathleen Livingston hung high above the Donnell stage, muscles taut, twisting in light and shadow. Auxwerks, a dance company from Ann Arbor, swept through – literally in one scene – offering impressionistic transitions between the scenes. Pop Culture Professor Montana Miller added a…


Arts X reaching for new heights

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Erin Garber-Pearson has performed several times at Arts X at Bowling Green State University. The former teacher in the School of Art feels right at home at the festival that brings all the arts on campus together. Her own work blends sculpture, video, storytelling and aerial acrobatics. That’s a perfect fit for Arts X with its mélange of art sales, exhibits, musical and theatrical performances, all colored by a certain level of tom foolery. When Garber-Pearson and Kathleen Livingston perform at Arts X as Violet and Fortuna on Saturday, Dec.3, the acrobatic storytellers will take the work to new heights. The work-in-progress “Laces” involves two solo and two duet pieces.  The duets require the performers to fly higher. Working as a solo aerialist is challenging enough but working together requires a heightened sense of communication and trust, Garber-Pearson said.  The duo has been working on the duets for three years. Arts X is “a good time to show” what they’ve been working on. The works fits right in to the theme of Arts X 2016:  “Volanti: Seeking Unknown Heights.” The event runs from 5 to 9 p.m. and is preceded at 4 p.m. by a holiday concert by the Bowling Green Philharmonia in Donnell Theatre in the Wolfe Center. Arts X is a free public event. Violet and Fortuna will perform two 20-minute shows, one at 7 p.m. and another at 8 p.m. in the Donnell Theatre. They will be joined by dancers from Auxwerks in Ann Arbor. Also BGSU faculty member Montana Miller will perform. According to the university, the former circus aerialist “will present a personal narrative of the truth behind the romantic image of flight based on her 25-year career as a professional aerial acrobat, from trapeze artist to high diver and now as a competitive, world record holding skydiver. She also will perform a piece to convey her journey through movement using aerial rings that she used to fly on 20 years ago.” Violet and Fortuna’s “Laces” tells the 100-year-old story of house in Toledo. Given Garber-Pearson’s work can’t fit it into one box, Arts X is ideal venue. “For me, it’s an opportunity to show my work to a diverse audience interested in the arts. I like it that it’s the whole campus… all the arts coming together for one event.” Garber-Pearson’s involvement in circus goes back to her graduate school days. She was introduced to them by her partner. She would create large kinetic sculptures that could be worn and set on fire. Then…


Schurk wraps up BGSU career as librarian of “the cool stuff”

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Talking to Bill Schurk is a trip down memory lane, and that lane leads through the byways of Cleveland, especially its libraries and thrift shops, as well as through byways of American popular music. Schurk is set to retire at the end of the year after almost 50 years of service as a librarian and archivist at Bowling Green State University’s storied sound recordings archive and popular culture library. He arrived just as BGSU turned its attention toward popular culture – “the cool stuff,” as he said they called it then. His job interview, he said, revolved more around jazz recordings than any library pursuits. Of course, he was already a known quantity having worked in the library as an undergraduate. And while Schurk career path wasn’t straight, it seems in retrospect to have been pre-ordained, bringing together his love of librarianship and his passion for collecting the arcana of popular culture. If you need information on an obscure popular song, he can find it for you, and then tell you all about the B-side. That all stems back to his childhood. He remembers collecting stuff as far back as age 5. There were magazines, bottle caps, stamps, even cigarette packs. His family had an old wind up record player, and he controlled that. He knew all the gift shops and thrift stores, where he could get the best buys. “I know how to acquire things,” he said. His parents, he said, were supportive, allowing him ample space in the house to store his treasures. Schurk’s first library job was at the Cleveland Public Library when he was in junior high school. Since then he always found himself working in some sort of library. Those ranged from a variety of positions in the Cleveland Public Library, including in the library for the blind. But it also involved working in the tool crib of a General Motors plant during his ill-fated stint as an engineering student. That, too, he said was a kind of library. And later back working in a Cadillac plant in Cleveland, he managed the room that stored the blueprints, yet another kind of library. It was while working at the Cadillac plant that he decided to go back to college. The Vietnam War Era draft was starting to breathe down his neck, and he saw even engineers getting call up. So he decided student deferment would be a good idea. Through a friend he met a young woman who attended BGSU. They hit it off. Schurk…


BGSU Arts Events through Nov. 23

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Through Nov. 21—“The Deathworks of May Elizabeth Kramner,” a mixed media installation by The Poyais Group, continues through Nov. 21 in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery in the Fine Arts Center. The exhibit purports to be a re-creation by the Poyais Group of outsider artist Kramner’s (1867-1977) private lifework, a tent version of the town where she lived, with each tent representing someone who had died. Discovered by a team of anthropologists after her death but then lost in a fire, the installation was remade by the Poyais Group (Jesse Ball, Thordis Bjornsdottir, Olivia Robinson and Jesse Stiles) based on notes by one of the original anthropologists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Through Nov. 22—“Criminal Justice?” an exhibit by activist artists Carol Jacobson and Andrea Bowers, investigates the attitudes and biases embedded in the U.S. criminal justice system. Jacobson is an award-winning social documentary artist whose works in video and photography address issues of women’s criminalization and censorship. Bowers’ video “#sweetjane” and drawings explore the 2012 Steubenville, Ohio, rape case and the citizens whose activism resulted in two rape convictions. The drawings reproduce the text messages sent among the teenage witnesses to the assault on an underage young woman. “Criminal Justice?” is on view in the Willard Wankelman Gallery at the Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Nov. 9—The Faculty Artist Series continues with guitarist Ariel Kasler. Kasler has performed at venues and events as diverse as the Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto, the Detroit Jazz Festival, the Grand Theater in London, Ontario, the Clore Center for Music and Dance in Israel, New Music from Bowling Green, the NASA regional conference in Urbana-Champaign, the Victorian College of Arts in Australia and Rutman’s Violins in Boston. The recital will begin at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 10—The Visiting Writer Series features award-winning author Claire Vaye Watkins. She is the author of “Gold Fame Citrus” and “Battleborn,” which won the Story Prize, the Dylan Thomas Prize, New York Public Library’s Young Lions Fiction Award, the Rosenthal Family Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and a Silver Pen Award from the Nevada Writers Hall of Fame. Her reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Nov. 10—BGSU’s Wind Symphony and Middle School Honor Band will perform at 7…


BGSU arts events through Nov. 16

Through Nov. 21 – “The Deathworks of May Elizabeth Kramer,” a mixed media installation by The Poyais Group, continues through Nov. 21 in the Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery in the Fine Arts Center. The exhibit is a purported recreation by the Poyais Group of outsider artist Kranmer’s (1867-1977) private lifework, a tent version of the town where she lived, with each tent representing someone who had died. Discovered by a team of anthropologists after her death but then lost in a fire, the installation was remade by the Poyais Group (Jesse Ball, Thordis Bjornsdottir, Olivia Robinson and Jesse Stiles) based on notes by one of the original anthropologists. Gallery Hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Through Nov. 22 – “Criminal Justice?” an exhibit by activist artists Carol Jacobson and Andrea Bowers, investigates the attitudes and biases embedded in the U.S. criminal justice system. Jacobson is an award-winning social documentary artist whose works in video and photography address issues of women’s criminalization and censorship. See story: http://bgindependentmedia.org/artist-documents-the-cycle-of-abuse-suffered-by-female-inmates/. Bowers’ video “#sweetjane” and drawings explore the 2012 Steubenville, Ohio rape case and the citizens whose activism resulted in two rape convictions. The drawings reproduce the text messages sent among the teenage witnesses to the assault on an underage young woman. “Criminal Justice?” is on view in the Willard Wankelman Gallery at the Fine Arts Center. Gallery Hours are 11 a.m. – 4p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, and 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Free Nov. 2 – The Faculty Artist Series features the BGSU woodwind faculty in an 8 p.m.performance in Bryan Recital Hall at the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Nov. 3 – The International Film Series continues with the 2015 film “Le Dernier Loup (Wolf Totem),” directed by Jean-Jacques Annaud. Life is tenuous for humans and animals in the wonderfully filmed Mongolian steppe. The story presents a stark view of the region 50 years ago, during China’s Cultural Revolution, focusing on Beijing student who goes to live among nomadic herdsmen in 1967. The modern world imperils the ecosystem form the south, while wolves, who hold spiritual meaning for the indigenous people, threaten from the North. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. Free Nov. 3-5 – The 16th annual Winter Wheat festival of writing celebrates writers and readers alike. Created in 2001 and produced by the Mid-American Review on the BGSU campus, the event will host writing workshops, question-and-answer sessions with authors, a book fair of literary journals and presses and an open mic opportunity. Most events will be…


Tom Muir wins the championship belt for best buckle

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News Making a belt buckle is not as simple as it seems, and it has taken master jeweler and metalsmith Tom Muir decades to get around to the task. Muir, who has taught in the Bowling Green State University School of Art for 25 years, said as a graduate student in the early 1980s he did try his hand at it. “But it never worked out quite right.” Even as he pursued other work that landed him recognition as one of the nation’s top jewelers, including an ornament on the White House Christmas tree in 1993, the challenge of making a belt buckle was in the back of his mind. Recently a technical and aesthetic considerations aligned, and he started creating belt buckles. And those are some buckles. One just won the World Champion Belt Buckle Competition. What’s the prize? A $250 in cash and a belt buckle, of course. Buckles are often awarded from traditional masculine activities, such as hunting and fishing and more recently barbecuing, Muir noted. (Making belt buckles may not be so gender-specific – one of Muir’s former students, Marissa Saneholtz, a BGSU and Bowling Green High graduate, received an honorable mention in the competition.) An avid amateur naturalist, Muir has been using forms from nature in his most recent work. He made one designed like a pig’s snout, a nod to competitive barbecuing.  In the case of the winning entry, he used the snout of a star-nosed mole for the buckle. In a statement for an exhibit Naughty Narrative (another former student from Bowling Green, Andrew Kuebeck, curated the show) Muir explained the attraction of the mole’s nose. “This busy, inscrutable animal living in fertile darkness makes a marvelous emblem of the human unconscious or dream life.  And its nose combines in a single form the tender vulnerability of a revealed secret with a plethora of foldings in which a sensual mystery appears to dream.” The artist sees even more. The soft, fleshiness of the snout evokes human genitalia, male and female. That’s played up by the placement of the buckle just about the groin. For men, this makes the buckle, like other adornments, a symbol of the wearer’s social status. The showy quality of the trophy buckle relates, Muir said, to his interest in body language. That’s all the more obvious during political campaigns. Experts, he said, have compared the way certain male politicians carry themselves to the way dominant chimpanzees strut about. That’s evident in the way Donald Trump presents himself, he said….


Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em Retro a labor of love

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News You wouldn’t expect an enterprise named Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em would have its roots in romance. But the idea for Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em Retro goes back when the owners Jon and Kayla Minniear were first dating. The couple shared a love of gaming and anything retro. “When we first started dating, we started collecting old Nintendo, and then we started collecting other stuff. … A lot of this is our duplicate stuff,” she says gesturing back to the shop. “We always talked about this, opening a storefront, back when we were dating.” They were also inspired by friends in their gaming community who operate similar stores. That dream will be realized Monday when Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em Retro opens at 192 S. Main St. in downtown Bowling Green. A ribbon cutting is scheduled for Nov. 3 at 11 a.m. The storefront formerly occupied by Mill Jewelry.  “My grandparents bought their wedding bands here,” Kayla Minniear said. “They’re super excited we got this space.” The store has been in the works for a while. Kayla Minniear, the daughter of Caroline and Ted Lippert of rural Bowling Green, cut back her hours at WYSZ six months ago to concentrate on sales at conventions and flea markets while they looked for a space. When the store front in downtown became available, they jumped at it. It’s hard, she said, to find a place with enough room and in such a prime location.  The Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em name seemed perfect for a retro game and toy shop. As they collected, and traded, going to sales and online, they accumulated duplicates of many of their favorites, and they dreamed about opening a store stocked with the kind of toys and games they and their parents grew up playing. Minniear, a 2011 Eastwood graduate, said used equipment is nothing new to her. She never had a new game system when she was a kid. “So I played a lot of my Dad’s.” So she likes the feel of those vintage games. “I feel like they’re more family friendly. So many of the new popular games are rated M,” she said. “With the old-school games, kids could play the same games as their parents.” The couple’s families are playing a part in getting the shop open by helping to clean, paint and stock shelves. Minniear said her mother Caroline Lippert, who studied art, has grand designs for the shop’s large front display window. Even Jon Minniear’s mother, who forbade him from playing video games…


Bob Dylan worthy recipient of Nobel Prize for Literature, BGSU scholars say

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News The times they are a changin’ in Stockholm. This year the Nobel Prize committee surprised the world by awarding the Literature Prize to songwriter Bob Dylan for “having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition.” Jack Santino, a professor of popular culture at Bowling Green State University, said the announcement had “an element of surprise.” “It’s expanding their rubric of what literature is,” he said. Lawrence Coates, who teaches in BGSU’s Creative Writing Program, noted Toni Morrison was the last American to win the Nobel for Literature, back in 1993. “That’s a long stretch without an American being recognized,” he said. And while as a fiction writer he has his own ideas about who would be fitting recipients of the prize – authors Don DeLillo and Cormac McCarthy – he nonetheless sees Dylan as a good choice. “That he works in the popular tradition of song is great,” Coates said. “Having somebody who writes and performs goes way back to the roots of literature. I appreciate the Nobel committee looking beyond literature having a very limited audience to literature that has a very broad audience.” “Often song lyrics don’t work when you just read them,” Santino said. Though lyrics as “stylized language” are closest to poetry as a literary genre, songs are a hybrid, akin to the graphic novel. “The curious element of it is a songwriter being canonized opens the floodgates for all sorts of things,” he said. Santino expects the choice will spark debates about what is and isn’t literature. “He has an ability to write a couplet, or to sum up a thought in a very catchy line or two, and they sort of enter into oral tradition which an interesting development is given his professional relationship to folk music,” Santino said. Santino said he jokes that the most common sources of catch phrases are the Bible, Shakespeare and Bob Dylan. People often don’t even know they are using Dylan’s words, he said. Coates noted the enduring power of the work after reciting a stanza of Dylan’s “Times Are a Changin’” in the course of the interview. The songwriter’s legacy is firmly rooted in his early career in the 1960s, Santino said. “He was an enormous presence at a particular point in history.” He emerged “at the same time, or maybe a tiny bit in advance, of when the American cultural scene was changing.” Dylan’s ability to express that, and even anticipate it “put him into that prophetic status.” Coates said: “One of…


Orange is the New Black stars to visit BG on behalf of Kelly Wicks

Submitted by the Kelly Wicks Campaign BOWLING GREEN, OH – Kelly Wicks, Democratic State House Candidate for District Three, will be joined Saturday, October 15, by stars of the Netflix series Orange is the New Black Taylor Schilling and Kate Mulgrew. Schilling and Mulgrew will speak at Wicks’ coffee shop, Grounds for Thought, at 1:00 p.m. about the importance of electing Kelly Wicks, and Democrats up and down the ballot, in November. Schilling and Mulgrew will encourage those in attendance to get involved in the campaign, and to canvass after the event on behalf of Kelly Wicks. Wicks said, “I’m thrilled to be joined by Taylor and Kate to talk about how important this year is for Democrats here in Wood County. I’m excited about the energy they will bring to our community.” The event is open to the public and free of charge.  


Oktoberfest Polka party on tap at BGSU, Oct. 19

From THE BGSU DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN RUSSIAN AND EAST ASIAN LANGUAGES The BGSU German Club and the Department of German Russian and East Asian Languages are hosting an Oktoberfest Polka event on Wednesday, Oct. 19 in the Lenhart Grand Ballroom of  Bowen Thompson Student Union on the Bowling Green State University campus. This event will be an opportunity to learn about – and dance to –German-American polkas and popular music played by The Jay Fox Bavarian Band. Jay has more than 40 years of experience to his credit along with a classical accordionist background and was four consecutive years AAA National Accordion Champion. His great-grand parents were born in Leipzig, Germany and being of German heritage, he specializes in German vocals and music. He is versatile and plays a variety of styles including: Viennese waltz, polka, big band, standards, country, blue-grass, pop, rock, oldies and semi-classical. For more info on the band and its members, visit http://jayfoxband.com/band/band.html. An exciting addition this year is a raffle featuring gift cards and other prizes from area businesses including Coyote Beads, D.P. Dough, The Flower Basket, For Keeps, Ginny’s Fashions, Grounds for Thought, Kabob-It, Mister Spots, Pagliai’s Pizza, Pisanello’s, Wings Over BG, and El Zarape. Falcon Food Restaurant is sponsoring the event.Tickets for the raffle will be available at the event. Doors open at 6 p.m. and a traditional German buffet featuring Bratwurst and German potato salad will be served from 6-8 p.m. The $10 admission fee (for non-students) also covers the buffet; students have free admission but there is a $5 charge for the buffet for students. A cash bar serving soft drinks and beer will also be available. For further information, contact Prof. Kristie Foell at foell@bgsu.edu or German Club President Molly Closson at mollyrc@bgsu.edu


3B’s “Young Frankenstein” laughs off Halloween spooks

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News   Get a jump on Halloween with shrieks of laughter rather than shrieks of fear. The folks at 3B Productions will present the musical stage version of Mel Brooks’ “Young Frankenstein” this weekend with shows Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and a Sunday matinee at 2:30 at the Maumee Indoor Theater, 601 Conant St., Maumee. Joe Barton, the show’s director and a founder of the troupe, said the inspiration to stage this Mel Brooks classic came from last fall’s Halloween-themed show, “The Addams Family.” Seeing Randy “Beef” Baughman as Lurch, he and others thought he’d make a great Frankenstein’s monster. Perfect casting, aside from the challenge of finding a tux that fits him. In “Young Frankenstein,” Mel Brooks imagined Frederick Frankenstein following in his grandfather Victor’s footsteps and creating a monster of his own. Brooks, as was his wont, turned the horror of the original and its multiple retellings, on its head and into a relentless comedy. “There’s not sad moment in the show,” Barton said. “Even the love songs are comedic.” Baughman’s son, Will, was cast as Frederick. They’ve shared the stage before, most recently in a very different seasonal musical. In spring Will Baughman played Jesus in “Jesus Christ Superstar” while Randy Baughman played the high-strutting high priest Caiaphas . “Young Frankenstein,” Barton said, gives the younger Baughman a chance to play a lighter, comic role. “It’s fun to watch them work together,” the director said of the father-son duo. With Janine Baughman, Randy’s wife and Will’s mother, as musical director the show as much a family affair for the Baughman’s as it is for the Frankenstein’s. Brooks did a seamless translation of his hit movie to the stage, adding a few musical numbers. Usually when doing a show that has a movie version, Barton advises against watching the film. Actors can pick up the tics of the screen performers. But in this case he told them to go ahead because he wanted to capture the anarchic energy of the original. Brooks wrote all the songs, music and lyrics, except for Irving Berlin’s “Putting’ on the Ritz,” which is used in the show’s tap dance scene. That move from screen to stage requires some stage magic to pull off effects like the operating table that lifts into the air while Frederick and Inga, played by Kristin Kekic, make love on it. The cast is thoroughly enjoying the rehearsal process, Barton said. No drudgery about long rehearsals. “Everyone’s really into it. They’re having so much fun.”…


Hollywood star America Ferrera tells students: The stakes are high in this election

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News TV and movie star America Ferrera knows what a lot of immigrant kids are going through these days. When she was 9 and living in California’s San Fernando Valley, the state’s voters were considering Prop 187 which would have barred all undocumented immigrants from receiving any public services including education. That was the first election she remembered. Now in the midst of another campaign with high stakes, Ferrera is touring the country to encourage people to register to vote, and then cast ballots for Hillary Clinton. She stopped by Bowling Green State University Sunday morning to give a pep talk to several dozen students preparing to go out and canvass the neighborhoods around campus. The community Ferrera lived in was diverse. She was a first generation America. Her parents came from Honduras. “My friends were first generation all kinds of things,” she said. Their parents came from Vietnam, China, Latin American countries, and Arab countries. At home they ate different kinds of foods and their parents “yelled at us in different languages,” Ferrara said. “But when we went to school we were all Americans because we pledged allegiance to the flag.” They all thought of themselves as “true-blooded Americans,” and “we all deserved justice and to be treated in the same way.” But in 1994 with Prop 187 on the ballot children were being questioned and taunted and threatened. Ferrera hadn’t experienced any of that but her mother took her aside to warn her and tell her if anyone ever questioned her to know: “You didn’t do anything wrong. You belong here.” For the first time in her life, Ferrera felt different from her peers. And she knows now with the overheated anti-immigrant rhetoric coming out of the Donald Trump campaign, families are reporting the same kind of harassment. Kids are told: “My dad says when Trump is president, he’s sending your parents away.” Young Arab-Americans wonder: “What does a ban on Muslims mean for them and their families?” Blacks wonder: “What does a nationwide stop and frisk mean for our lives?” “The stakes have never been higher,” she said. In introducing Ferrera, Kandann Coleman, the president of the Latin Student Union, which sponsored the visit, said the same thing.  “Politics really do matter especially to people of color.” Later in an interview, she said, her fellow students seem “indifferent.” The Democrats and Republicans are present, but other students tend to steer clear of them. Students are involved in their own service efforts, and tend to focus on those…


BGSU symposium looks at global response to 9/11

By DAVID DUPONT BG Independent News On the Friday in advance of the 15th anniversary of 9/11 attacks, students from Bowling Green State University shared what they had learned about how others viewed this defining act of terrorism. And the symposium Global Responses to 9/11 and the War on Terror: Literary, Media, and Film perspectives proved such a success that the organizers are considering whether this should be an annual event. The symposium grew out of Khani Begum’s graduate course of the same name offered in spring, 2015.  The 18 students, who represented a variety of academic disciplines including English, Literary and Textual Analysis, Creative Writing, American Culture Studies and Pop Culture, wrote papers of such distinction that late in the semester Begum mused that it was too bad they couldn’t present them as a group in a conference. Sarah Worman and Elena Aponte, members of ATLAS, an organization of students studying Literary and Textual Analysis, discussed the idea, and decided the organization would take on organizing the event. Begum and the graduate students decided to open symposium up to others who may want to present papers or organize panels. All it meant was working over the summer. Worman said the symposium was well attended with the keynote address by Jeffrey Brown, professor in the Pop Culture Department, on “Rewriting 9/11: Superheroes and the Remasculinization of America” drawing the largest audience. Begum had asked Brown to present the talk after hearing him give a class on the topic during last spring’s alumni college. More than a dozen other faculty members also volunteered to present papers or participate in panel discussions. The subjects ranged from a panel of Muslim women talking about their experiences wearing the veil while living in American to a discussion of stand-up comedians’ handling of the tragedy. There were presentations about news coverage, rap music’s response, the impact on children, and the many films and television shows addressing the attack and its aftermath. Worman’s paper contrasted two cinematic looks at terror mastermind Osama Bin Laden. One was the American movie “Zero Dark Thirty,” and the other was the Bollywood film “Tere Bin Laden.” The American action-thriller, directed by Kathryn Bigelow, had revenge at its core, she said. The Indian film, however, took a comic approach. It was about a Pakistani reporter who wants to move to America. He thinks if he can peddle a film about an exclusive interview with Bin Laden he will garner enough media attention to get a visa. Except, there was no interview. It’s all a hoax. The…


BGSU Lively Arts Calendar, Sept. 6- 21

From BGSU OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Sept. 6 – Tuesdays at the Gish kicks off with “Almost Famous” (2000), directed by Cameron Crowe. Set in the 1970s, this semi-autobiographical story based on the director’s experiences as a rock journalist for Rolling Stone continues to be a beloved coming-of-age and rock-n-roll film. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Sept. 7 – The Faculty Artist Series continues with Penny Thompson Kruse performing on violin presenting a recital on the theme of Farewell to Summer. The recital begins at 8 p.m. in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center. Free Sept. 8 – The Visiting Writer Series welcomes American fiction writer Alissa Nutting, author of “Tampa” and the short story collection “Unclean Jobs for Women and Girls.” The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Prout Chapel. Free Sept. 8 – BGSU’s International Film Series commences with “Fordson: Faith, Fasting and Football,” directed by Rashid Ghazi. The 2016 documentary follows a predominantly Arab-American high school football team from Dearborn, Mich., during the last 10 days of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan and unearths the story of a community desperately holding onto its Islamic faith while struggling to gain acceptance in post 9-11 America. The screening begins at 7:30 p.m. Free Sept. 10 – The Falcon Marching Band will perform during the BGSU vs North Dakota football game. Join in the festivities at 3 p.m. in the Doyt Perry Stadium. Tickets to the football game are available at bgsufalcons.com/buytickets or 1-877-247-8842. Sept. 10 – Guest artist Stacy Mastrian, soprano, will perform in Bryan Recital Hall of the Moore Musical Arts Center at 8 p.m. Free Sept. 11 – The Sunday Matinee Series begins with the 1912 films “An Unseen Enemy” and “Musketeers of Pig Alley,” directed by D.W. Griffith, followed by “Harvest” (1953), directed by James Sheldon. In this “Robert Montgomery Presents,” two legendary figures appear: Dorothy Gish is James Dean’s mother in a highly charged farm-country drama, which has been preserved in Kinescope form. The screening begins at 3 p.m. in the Gish Film Theater located in Hanna Hall. Free Sept. 11 – The Faculty Artist Series continues with assistant professor of violin Caroline Chin performing at the Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St., Toledo. The recital begins at 3 p.m. in the Great Gallery. Free Sept. 13 – Tuesdays at the Gish continues with “Eve’s Bayou,” a 1997 film directed by Kasi Lemmons. A gothic story that transforms the family home into…


Author to discuss Ohio’s presidential election bellwether status at Toledo Museum of Art, Sept.22

From TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART Kyle Kondik, author of the new book “The Bellwether: Why Ohio Picks the President,” will appear on Sept. 22 at the Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle. Just days ahead of the first presidential candidate debate, Kondik will shed light on the Buckeye State’s remarkable record as a predictor of presidential election winners. The free event at 7 p.m. is being presented jointly by the Museum and the Toledo Lucas County Public Library. Kondik is managing editor for the nonpartisan political forecasting newsletter Sabato’s Crystal Ball, published by the University of Virginia Center for Politics. Using historical documentation and research, he will explain Ohio’s remarkable record for predicting presidential election results and why the state is essential to the 2016 election. A book signing and reception in Libbey Court will follow the presentation. Kondik is the first of five speakers making appearances in Toledo this fall in conjunction with the Museum’s nonpartisan exhibition I Approve This Message: Decoding Political Ads. Others include University of Michigan political scientist Ted Brader; American Press Institute senior manager Jane Elizabeth; University of Michigan musicologist Mark Clague; and media, entertainment and technology executive/advisor Don Levy. (See BG Independent News story on the exhibit at: http://bgindependentmedia.org/toledo-museum-exhibit-dissects-the-emotional-manipulation-of-political-ads/) Ted Brader, author of the book “Campaigning for Hearts and Minds,” will discuss how emotional appeals in political ads work at 2 p.m. Sept. 24 in the Little Theater. Brader is a professor of political science at the University of Michigan and at the Center for Political Studies in the Institute for Social Research. He is a principal investigator of the American National Election Studies and has received multiple grants from the National Science Foundation for studies of political psychology, political communication, public opinion and voting behavior. A book signing will follow in Libbey Court. Jane Elizabeth will give a presentation titled “Fact-Challenged: Finding Truth and Accuracy in a Fact-Resistant World,” at 2 p.m. Oct. 1 in the Little Theater. A senior manager at the American Press Institute, she will discuss the challenges journalists face in reaching voters with the facts during a fact-challenged campaign advertising season. Music has the power to inspire devotion and mobilize individuals to action. University of Michigan musicologist Mark Clague discusses how music has been used to shape U.S. presidential contests, at 2 p.m. Oct. 8 in the Little Theater. As examples, he will offer songs ranging from 19th century parodies to today’s pop anthems. Media, entertainment and technology executive/advisor Don Levy examines the persuasive power of visual effects, illusion and perception, at 6 p.m. Oct. 27…